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Guilt as Madness: An Interview with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne

  • MUBI
Photo by Darren HughesThe Unknown Girl opens with a handheld close up of Dr. Jenny (Adèle Haenel) examining a patient. “Listen,” she says, handing her stethoscope to Julien (Olivier Bonnaud), a medical student who is interning at her clinic. Never ones to shy away from a glaring metaphor, Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne announce in that brief exchange their film’s driving thematic and formal concerns. When Jenny later learns that her decision to not allow a late-night visitor into the clinic might have contributed to the young woman’s death, she puts her skills and training to new purpose: listening for clues that might help solve the murder.The Unknown Girl differs from the Dardennes’ previous fiction films only in its more obviously generic plotting. This seems to have contributed to the uncharacteristically mixed reviews that greeted the film at its 2016 Cannes premiere, where it was faulted for failing to
See full article at MUBI »

Curzon launches monthly subscription VoD offering

  • ScreenDaily
Curzon launches monthly subscription VoD offering
Exclusive: Curzon12 will stream recent and classic movies; first lineup revealed.

Curzon is beefing up its online offering with the launch of Curzon12, a monthly VoD service built into its membership packages.

The service will host 12 recent and classic movies which will be available to stream when logging in with a Curzon membership.

Scroll down for first lineup

Each month’s curated lineup, taken exclusively from Curzon’s library, is selected by the company’s programming team and is designed to complement the films playing across Curzon’s cinemas and its day-and-date service on Curzon Home Cinema that month.

The collection will feature the work of directors such as Yorgos Lanthimos, Charlie Chaplin, Andrea Arnold, Satyajit Ray and Agnes Varda as well as lesser known filmmakers.

The offering will be accompanied by a monthly newsletter that will delve deeper into three headline titles for that month.

The subscription is a benefit for existing and future members at no additional
See full article at ScreenDaily »

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers
Any list of the greatest foreign directors currently working today has to include Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. The directors first rose to prominence in the mid 1990s with efforts like “The Promise” and “Rosetta,” and they’ve continued to excel in the 21st century with titles such as “The Kid With A Bike” and “Two Days One Night,” which earned Marion Cotillard a Best Actress Oscar nomination.

Read MoreThe Dardenne Brothers’ Next Film Will Be a Terrorism Drama

The directors will be back in U.S. theaters with the release of “The Unknown Girl” on September 8, which is a long time coming considering the film first premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016. While you continue to wait for their new movie, the brothers have provided their definitive list of 79 movies from the 20th century that you must see. La Cinetek published the list in full and is hosting many
See full article at Indiewire »

The Dardennes List Their Favorite Films Of The 20th Century

I’m tremendously fond of the Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardennes‘ work. They deserve to be high on the list of the best filmmakers working in the French film industry today, and although their last film, “The Unknown Girl,” would qualify as their first misfire, they have given us so many great films over the years (“The Kid With A Bike,” “L’Enfant,” “Rosetta“) that it’s a no brainer to have them situated next to Michael Haneke and Olivier Assayas as the current European masters.

Continue reading The Dardennes List Their Favorite Films Of The 20th Century at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

SXSW Interview — ‘La Barracuda’ Is A Bold, Unique Take on the Texas Family Drama

An enlightening conversation with the team behind one of the best films at this year’s SXSW.

Patricia Highsmith is Texas-born. A lot of people think she’s English, or from New York or something, but she’s Fort Worth born and bred.” Jason Cortlund, who along with Julia Halperin wrote and directed the SXSW narrative competition entry La Barracuda, is telling me about how the famed writer of The Talented Mr. Ripley and Strangers on a Train was an influence on the film’s screenplay. Indeed, Cortlund and Halperin’s engrossing Austin-set thriller evokes shades of those page-turning mysteries, albeit with a Texas-fried perspective that is entirely their own. La Barracuda is one of those films you can only hope to catch at a festival, an utterly new take on familiar conventions that leaves you with the unshakeable feeling that you have witnessed a breakout for all involved. You’ve seen the dysfunctional Texas family drama
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Berlin to open with Django Reinhardt biopic

  • ScreenDaily
Berlin to open with Django Reinhardt biopic
Etienne Comar’s directorial debut stars Reda Kateb as iconic musician.

The 67th Berlin International Film Festival will open on Feburary 9 with the world premiere of Etienne Comar’s (Of Gods And Men) directorial debut Django.

The film, which will play in competition at the Berlinale, revolves around Django Reinhardt, the iconic guitarist and composer, and his flight from German-occupied Paris in 1943 where as Sinti his family was harassed and hounded by the Nazis.

Reda Kateb (Far From Men) stars in the title role alongside Cécile de France (The Kid with a Bike), as well as Alex Brendemühl and Ulrich Brandhoff.

Director Comar is best known as the screenwriter and producer of titles including Of Gods And Men, Haute Cuisine and My King, and as a co-producer of The Women on the 6th Floor and Timbuktu.

The screenplay comes from Comar and Alexis Salatko. Django Reinhardt’s music was re-recorded for the film by the Dutch jazz band
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘Django’ will open this year’s Berlin Film Festival

The opening film of the 2017 Berlinale has been revealed.

Etienne Comar’s directorial debut Django will open the festival, and participate in the official competition of the Berlinale.

The French film revolves around Django Reinhardt, the famous guitarist and composer, and his flight from German-occupied Paris in 1943. Within moments, this superb guitarist was able to reach people’s hearts with his instrument. Yet as Sinti, his family was harassed and hounded by the Nazis.

Django Reinhardt was one of the most brilliant pioneers of European jazz and the father of Gypsy Swing. Django grippingly portrays one chapter in the musician’s eventful life and is a poignant tale of survival. Constant danger, flight and the atrocities committed against his family could not make him stop playing,” says Berlinale Director Dieter Kosslick.

Director Etienne Comar has already made a name for himself as a screenwriter and producer – Of Gods and Men,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Criterion Reflections – L’enfance nue (1968) – #534

David’s Quick Take for the tl;dr Media Consumer:

L’enfance nue (translated into English, “Naked Childhood”) consists of a series of sharply observed and well-chosen moments in the troubled life of Francois Fournier, a ten-year old ward of the French foster care system. Director Maurice Pialat made his feature debut, with the support and assistance of Francois Truffaut and Claude Berri, among others, presenting a story that some might find reminiscent of The 400 Blows but without the romantic charm and lovable mischief we associate with Antoine Doinel. (There are no picturesque romps through the streets of Paris or heroic-epic pilgrimages to the ocean in this one, though there is a mad dash tracking shot of a kid nursing a sprained wrist after he’s tossed to the ground following his assault of one of his peers.) Here, the cast is populated by ordinary people in the most quotidian situations,
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Dardenne Brothers’ Next Film Will Be a Terrorism Drama

The Dardenne Brothers’ Next Film Will Be a Terrorism Drama
The Dardenne Brothers always write and direct their films at a steady clip, often releasing their films in three- or four-year intervals. Their latest film “The Unknown Girl,” about a doctor who sets out to find the identity of an unknown young woman who died after she was refused surgery, premiered at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Now, Variety reports that Luc Dardenne says that the duo are set to make their next film, which will be about the rise of terrorism in Europe. “We are writing the script now, and hope to shoot it in Belgium by the fall of next year,” says the Dardenne brother.

Read More: Cannes Review: ‘The Unknown Girl’ is Dardenne Brothers Doing a Detective Movie

Luc Dardenne is currently at the 20th Lima Film Festival as they are paying tribute to his film work. As part of the tribute, Lima is screening a section of the Dardennes’ films,
See full article at Indiewire »

Dardenne Brothers to Make Terrorism-Themed Drama (Exclusive)

Dardenne Brothers to Make Terrorism-Themed Drama (Exclusive)
Lima – Belgian filmmaking brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne are developing a drama about the rise of terrorism in Europe. “We are writing the script now, and hope to shoot it in Belgium by the fall of next year,” said Luc Dardenne, to whom the 20th Lima Film Festival is paying tribute. The still untitled project dovetails with the filmmaking duo’s penchant for stories about the working class and marginalized fringes of society.

As part of their tribute, Lima is screening a selection of the brothers’ most iconic pics, including their Cannes Palme d’Or winners “Rosetta” and “L’Enfant” as well as “La Promesse” and Cannes 2011 Grand Prix winner “The Kid with a Bike.”

“I’m very honored to be here to receive this homage,” said Dardenne, who is visiting Lima for the first time.

Meanwhile, the brothers are co-producing $1.1 million dramedy “Drole de Pere” (roughly translated to “Funny
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Joshua Reviews Catherine Corsini’s Summertime [Theatrical Review]

There are few actresses quite like Cecile de France.

Best known for her work in films like The Kid with a Bike, de France has become one of the mainstays of French cinema, with mainstream Us audiences getting to know the great actress through a range of performances in films such as High Tension to the Clint Eastwood-helmed Hereafter. De France has captivated audiences with her stunning beauty and magnetic screen presence and physicality, and her latest picture shines a distinct light on both of those things.

Entitled Summertime, de France stars opposite Izia Higelin, in what is one of the year’s most touching tales of romance. Higelin is the picture’s lead, starring as a young farm girl named Delphine who leaves the strict confines of her parents’ farm to move to Paris with the hopes of growing personally and economically. When she comes across a group of feminists,
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Dardennes Have Re-Edited ‘The Unknown Girl’ For Theatrical Release

If you don’t like the result of something — or if others don’t — do it again. That seems to be the approach by directing brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne with their most recent feature The Unknown Girl, which rounded Cannes with mixed reviews, including our own. After a slew of successes — including Two Days, One Night, The Promise, The Kid With A Bike, and Rosetta — The Unknown Girl stands out rather glaringly as an anomaly for the pair.

Screen Daily reports that the Palme d’Or-winning duo sat down with their editor to make minor tweaks to The Unknown Girl, only to realize a more extensive revision felt right. Now, 32 cuts have been made to the film about a young doctor who is propelled to uncover the identity of a patient who died after refusing treatment. This new cut will run seven minutes shorter — the original cut ran 1 hour
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cannes archives: Screen's Jury Grid 2011 - winners and losers

Cannes archives: Screen's Jury Grid 2011 - winners and losers
As Cannes approaches, Screen recalls what came top (and bottom) of our Jury Grid in 2011 - a year that included The Artist, Drive and a wave of controversy from Lars Von Trier.

In annual tradition, Screen’s illustrious jury of international critics delivered their verdict on the films in Competition at Cannes 2011 - the year that the Palme d’Or went to Terrence Malick for his experimental drama The Tree of Life.

The film marked the elusive Us auteur’s first return to the festival since winning best director for Days of Heaven in 1978.

But Screen’s jury was not as impressed. While The Tree of Life scored a respectable 2.8 out of 4, top marks went to atmospheric Turkish crime drama Once Upon a Time in Anatolia by Nuri Bilge Ceylan, with a score of 3.3.

The film was Ceylan’s fourth in Competition at Cannes, and tied for the Grand Jury Prize with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne’s [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes archives: Screen's Jury Grid 2011

Cannes archives: Screen's Jury Grid 2011
As Cannes approaches, Screen recalls what came top (and bottom) of our Jury Grid in 2011 - a year that included The Artist, Drive and a wave of controversy from Lars Von Trier.

In annual tradition, Screen’s illustrious jury of international critics delivered their verdict on the films in Competition at Cannes 2011 - the year that the Palme d’Or went to Terrence Malick for his experimental drama The Tree of Life.

The film marked the elusive Us auteur’s first return to the festival since winning best director for Days of Heaven in 1978.

But Screen’s jury was not as impressed. While The Tree of Life scored a respectable 2.8 out of 4, top marks went to atmospheric Turkish crime drama Once Upon a Time in Anatolia by Nuri Bilge Ceylan, with a score of 3.3.

The film was Ceylan’s fourth in Competition at Cannes, and tied for the Grand Jury Prize with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne’s [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Recommended Discs & Deals of the Week: ‘Inside Llewyn Davis,’ ‘Straight Outta Compton,’ ‘Gilda,’ and More

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The Diary of a Teenage Girl (Marielle Heller)

Writer-director Marie Heller paints an accurate, honest, and vibrant portrait of her young protagonist, Minnie (Bel Powley), in The Diary of a Teenage Girl. With the use of some beautiful hand-drawn animation, an enlightening and funny narration, and Powley’s versatile performance, this is about as intimate as a subjective picture gets. We experience the world as this young girl does. What’s exciting for Minnie feels truly exciting, and
See full article at The Film Stage »

Recommended Discs & Deals of the Week: ‘Out 1,’ ‘The Martian,’ ‘The Look of Silence,’ and More

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The Look of Silence (Joshua Oppenheimer)

Calling Joshua Oppenheimer’s The Look of Silence the year’s finest documentary is not inaccurate; the film certainly deserves that crown. Yet it’s hard not to feel like such a classification does Silence a slight injustice. The film is, after all, an overwhelmingly emotional modern classic. Like Oppenheimer’s 2012 masterpiece The Act of Killing, this stunning follow-up features the actual perpetrators of the Indonesian killings of 1965–66. With shocking openness, these
See full article at The Film Stage »

Disc Deals: 50% Off Criterion Blu-rays at Amazon

The Barnes & Noble sale may have ended a couple of weeks ago, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t still buy some Criterion Collection releases for 50% off. Best Buy is currently having a 50% off sale on a number of Criterion releases, and Amazon has begun to match their prices.

Thanks to everyone for supporting our site by buying through our affiliate links.

A note on Amazon deals, for those curious: sometimes third party sellers will suddenly appear as the main purchasing option on a product page, even though Amazon will sell it directly from themselves for the sale price that we have listed. If the sale price doesn’t show up, click on the “new” options, and look for Amazon’s listing.

I’ll keep this list updated throughout the week, as new deals are found, and others expire. If you find something that’s wrong, a broken link or price difference,
See full article at CriterionCast »

European Film Awards To Fete Lucky Red Topper Andrea Occhipinti

Rome – The upcoming European Film Awards will fete Italian producer and distributor Andrea Occhipinti with the Prix Eurimages dedicated to celebrating the key role of co-productions in boosting the growth of the European film industry.

Occhipinti’s Rome-based shingle Lucky Red over the past 28 years has distributed some 250 titles and produced more than 40 feature films, a large portion of which supported by Eurimages. Eurimages is the Council of Europe’s fund supporting European co-productions. It also helps promote their theatrical distribution.

Standout Euro co-prods Lucky Red has handled include Paolo Sorrentino’s “Il Divo” and “This Must Be The Place,” Dardenne brothers-directed “The Kid With a Bike,” and Michel Ocelot’s toon “Azur et Asmar.”

Lucky Red has had a hand in many other successful co-prods by directors from all over the world, including Lars Von Trier, Patrice Leconte, Wong Kar-Wai, Park Chan-Wook, Peter Mullan, Francois Ozon, Gurinder Chadha, Hayao Miyazaki,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Dardenne Brothers’ 10 Favorite Films

It should surprise precisely nobody that Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne made a single list for Sight & Sound, and it doesn’t strike me as odd that they acted so nonchalant about the effort. Their comments section will say it all: “A random list of ten greatest films.” I do, however, question the extent to which this is “random,” insofar as connections to their oeuvre are concerned, and fellow fans will probably notice commonalities from the word “go.”

All right, yes, The Big Heat doesn’t exactly scream “social realism,” but the concerns shared by many of these pictures — economic and social inequality, for one, as well as the strains they put on romantic and parent-child relationships — rings through the Dardennes’ long career. If Shoah or Modern Times are a bit more dour and comedic (guess which adjective applies to which film) than The Kid with a Bike, they have the qualities of forebears,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Watch: Detailed Video Essay Studies The Technique And Composition Of The Dardennes' 'Two Days, One Night'

“It’s hard to think that a pair of filmmakers who have won two Palme d’Or prizes at the Cannes Film Festival could be underrated, but the extent of Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne’s talents still feel insufficiently realized. Their latest work, 'Two Days, One Night' — which is now available through the Criterion Collection— showcases an area of their acumen seldom discussed when praising their work: shot composition.” Marshall Shaffer’s 7-and-a-half-minute video essay begins with that big thesis. What follows is extremely well edited video that deftly delivers on its premise, showcasing Shaffer’s astute eye for dissecting the latest work by the Dardenne brothers, known for movies like “L’enfant,” “The Son,” and “The Kid with a Bike.” Just a heads up: this video essay lays out the broad strokes of the plot of “Two Days, One Night” and gets into specifics about scenes, even hinting at the film’s conclusion.
See full article at The Playlist »
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