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Robert Pattinson Talks “F**king Dark” Project With Antonio Campos

Coming off what are arguably two of the best performances of his career in James Gray‘s “The Lost City Of Z” and the Safdies‘ “Good Time,” Robert Pattinson isn’t changing course. The actor is continuing to chase challenging roles with auteur directors, and his next sounds like it’s going to be another barn burner.

Earlier this year it was revealed that Pattinson was teaming up on an unnamed project with Antonio Campos, the filmmaker behind “Christine,” “Simon Killer,” and “Afterschool.” Now, Esquire has revealed the title of the film is “The Devil All The Time,” and it sounds like the actor is diving into a pretty steamy role.

Continue reading Robert Pattinson Talks “F**king Dark” Project With Antonio Campos at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

TV Hijacks Film Fests for High-Profile Bows

As rival top-tier film festivals across the globe began to program episodic television, Cannes’ artistic director Thierry Fremaux remained a notable holdout — until recently.

Earlier this year, he relented and invited David Lynch’s “Twin Peaks” TV reboot and Jane Campion’s “Top of the Lake 2: China Girl” to the Croisette for special screenings, the former with full red-carpet treatment. In April, Fremaux explained to Variety that while he is “not a big fan of series,” he justified the inclusion of Campion and Lynch as auteurs who are experimenting with “new narrative means.”

“Cinema remains a singular art, and we want to emphasize this while keeping our eyes open on the world that surrounds it,” Fremaux says. “And this world is more and more about TV series and virtual reality.”

Fremaux’s desire to keep the “film” in “film festival” was admirable, but possibly futile. Sundance, Toronto, Tribeca, South by Southwest, Berlin
See full article at Variety - TV News »

New to Streaming: ‘Logan,’ ‘Good Morning,’ ‘The Lego Batman Movie,’ ‘The Survivalist,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Before I Fall (Ry Russo-Young)

Harold Ramis certainly didn’t invent it, but his Groundhog Day made the narrative loop device a mainstream mainstay, lovingly aped in everything from Source Code to Edge of Tomorrow to 50 First Dates. In Before I Fall, the loop treatment is utilized rather intelligently by director Ry Russo-Young, from Maria Maggenti screenplay adapted from Lauren Oliver‘s novel. – Dan M. (full review)

Where to Stream: Amazon,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Memo to Distributors: Buy These 2017 Tribeca Film Festival Movies

  • Indiewire
Memo to Distributors: Buy These 2017 Tribeca Film Festival Movies
The 2017 Tribeca Film Festival has come and gone, but several of its highlights face an uncertain future. While the festival opened with an iTunes-ready documentary about Clive Davis and closed with back-to-back screenings of the first two “Godfather” films, many of the films in its competition sections arrived at the festival without distribution deals and ended it in the same state. Here’s at a few significant titles from this year’s edition that deserve to get picked up.

Blame

Overachieving multi-hyphenate Quinn Shephard was just 20 when she wrote, directed, produced, edited and starred in her feature directorial debut, a modern spin on Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible,” set in the witch hunt capital of contemporary America: the suburban high school. While Shephard cast herself as the film’s Abigail Williams — an outcast with secrets to spare who gets entangled with a smoldering substitute teacher, played by Chris Messina — the
See full article at Indiewire »

Christine review – Rebecca Hall is extraordinary as Christine Chubbuck

Antonio Campos gives the true story of the American TV news reporter who killed herself on air its second, superior big-screen telling

Two films made last year explored the wrenching, real-life story of the Florida-based local news reporter Christine Chubbuck who in 1974 took her own life on live television. Robert Greene’s Kate Plays Christine was a tricksy moral maze of a movie that explored the ethical dilemma of being a parasite of tragedy. By comparison, Antonio Campos’s Christine is less experimental in its approach, but this elegant, achingly sad study of debilitating depression is by no means a conventional piece of film-making. Deftly sidestepping any of the obvious narrative choices, this film confirms Campos (Afterschool, Simon Killer) as one of the most intelligent and consistently surprising film-makers working in Us indie cinema.

Related: Rebecca Hall on starring in Christine: 'It’s about her life – not her death'

Continue reading.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Movie Review – Christine (2016)

Christine, 2016.

Directed by Antonio Campos.

Starring Rebecca Hall, Michael C. Hall, Tracy Letts, Maria Dizzia, Timothy Simons, J. Smith-Cameron and Kim Shaw.

Synopsis:

The story of Christine Chubbuck, a 1970s TV reporter struggling with depression and professional frustrations as she tries to advance her career.

On July 15th 1974, Christine Chubbuck – a newsreader disillusioned by the burgeoning “if it bleeds it leads” culture of news-announced live, “In keeping with the Wzrb policy of presenting the most immediate and complete reports of local blood and guts, TV 30 presents what is believed to be a television first. In living colour, exclusive coverage of an attempted suicide.” Removing a revolver from her bag covered by a felt puppet of a crocodile, she shot herself in the head, ultimately dying in the hospital later that day.

Christine locks herself away in her bedroom in fits of envy and loneliness, writing self-improvement plans whilst her hippie
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Rebecca Hall Airs a Story in Exclusive Clip From Antonio Campos’ ‘Christine’

One of the best performances of the last year can be found in the latest film from Afterschool and Simon Killer director Antonio Campos, the character study Christine. His first feature based on a true story, it follows the final weeks of the life of Christine Chubbuck (Rebecca Hall), a Florida-based news reporter who committed suicide live on air in the summer of 1974. With the film now available on VOD, we’re pleased to premiere an exclusive clip, which features Hall’s character on-air about a local zoning crisis.

I said in my review, “Hall, in one of her best performances, embodies Christine with searing intensity, staring blankly while her co-workers offer simple questions and in one remarkable scene, puzzling a woman offering many different solutions to help her situation. Her initially nervous energy eventually evolves into verbal explosions at her mother (J. Smith-Cameron) and Michael, placing the blame on
See full article at The Film Stage »

New to Streaming: ‘Cameraperson,’ ‘Aquarius,’ ‘Christine,’ ‘It Follows,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Aquarius (Kleber Mendonça Filho)

The staggeringly accomplished debut feature by Brazilian critic-turned-director Kleber Mendonça Filho, Neighboring Sounds, announced the arrival of a remarkable new talent in international cinema. Clearly recognizable as the work of the same director, Mendonça’s equally assertive follow-up, Aquarius, establishes his authorial voice as well as his place as one of the most eloquent filmic commentators on the contemporary state of Brazilian society. – Giovanni M.
See full article at The Film Stage »

New to Streaming: ‘Pete’s Dragon,’ Pedro Almodóvar, ‘Train to Busan,’ ‘The Bfg,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Always Shine (Sophia Takal)

With the excess of low-budget, retreat-in-the-woods dramas often finding characters hashing out their insecurities through a meta-narrative, a certain initial resistance can occur when presented with such a derivative scenario at virtually every film festival. While Sophia Takal‘s psychological drama Always Shine ultimately stumbles, the chemistry of its leads and a sense of foreboding dread in its formal execution ensures its heightened view of
See full article at The Film Stage »

Borderline Films Retrospective Trailer: See Stirring Clips From ‘James White,’ ‘Christine’ and More

Borderline Films Retrospective Trailer: See Stirring Clips From ‘James White,’ ‘Christine’ and More
Beginning now until November 27, cinephiles can enjoy all of Borderline Film’s movies at the Museum of the Moving Image’s seven-film retrospective in New York. To kick off the event, the production company shared a dynamic new trailer composed of all the features that will be screened, which you can check out below.

The celebration kicked off this past Thursday with the NY premiere of “The Eyes of My Mother” with director Nicholas Pesce in person. On Friday, November 18, a special screening of “Christine” was held with star Rebecca Hall in attendance. Since its premiere, the actress has been praised for her performance as the Florida news reporter who killed herself on air.

“With the critical acclaim around Rebecca Hall’s performance and Antonio Campos’s direction of the highly topical character study ‘Christine,’ and the New York premiere of the mesmerizing thriller ‘The Eyes of My Mother,’ this
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Trainspotting’ Author Irvine Welsh Teases Possible TV Series Spinoff

‘Trainspotting’ Author Irvine Welsh Teases Possible TV Series Spinoff
Come March of next year, fans of “Trainspotting” will be reunited with the characters and actors of the original film in “T2 Trainspotting.” The sequel will have the original cast of the 1996 movie and have Danny Boyle return as director.

While we wait for the second film, “Trainspotting” author Irvine Welsh spoke out about his plans for the novel’s future, and teased a possible TV spinoff.

Telling NME that we can expect further adaptations involving the characters, he stated, “Basically, I’ve plans for them all. All in various kind of schedules or adaptations. It’s all ruling on cable TV, cable TV has some interesting developments. We’re working on all these different kind of things.”

“I think now anybody who’s in the book, whether they like it or not, they’re working on the way of being in the film,” he added. “You keep that in mind.
See full article at Indiewire »

Borderline Films Retrospective at Museum of the Moving Image

  • Indiewire
Borderline Films Retrospective at Museum of the Moving Image
In its 13 years, Borderline Films has produced such films as “Simon Killer,” “Martha Marcy May Marlene” and “Christine.” MoMI is screening all of them.

Related storiesThe Orchard Picks Up Antonio Campos' 'Christine' and Aims for Next Year's Oscars RaceIndie Collective Borderline Films Launching New Executive Production LabelHaunting First Look at 'The Eyes of My Mother' Makes This Sundance Premiere a Must-See
See full article at Indiewire »

Antonio Campos’ Top 10 Films

With his three features — Aftershool, Simon Killer, and, most recently, Christine — director Antonio Campos has crafted a trilogy of tightly controlled character studies that put us in the scarred minds of our protagonists like few other emerging directors. To get a sense of the formative films in his life, as part of his submission to the latest Sight & Sound poll, the director revealed his 10 favorite films.

Including his “favorite film” A Clockwork Orange (as well as another Kubrick feature), there’s also classics from Francis Ford Coppola, Ingmar Bergman, and François Truffaut. Also popping up are films from Michael Haneke and Bruno Dumont, which should be no surprise if you’ve seen one of Campos’ films, and the oldest selection is King Vidor‘s The Crowd, a technically marvelous achievement from the silent era.

Check out this picks below, following a primer quote from his interview with Slant:

I grew up on narrative cinema.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Exclusive: Channel 30 Is The Place To Be In This Clip From The Acclaimed ‘Christine’

With many turning online to get the latest in world events, the charm of the local news team is losing its luster for a certain generation. But director Antonio Campos (“Afterschool,” “Simon Killer“) takes audiences back to the polyester and cheesy music of 1970s television with “Christine,” albeit with a chillier edge, with his acclaimed drama telling a true story that remains shocking decades later.

Continue reading Exclusive: Channel 30 Is The Place To Be In This Clip From The Acclaimed ‘Christine’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Christine’ review [Lff 2016]

Christine review: Rebecca Hall turns in a career-best performance as the ill-fated Christine Chubbuck in this engrossing and supremely constructed biopic.

Christine review by Paul Heath, Lff 2016.

Antonio Campos (Afterschool, Simon Killer) switches genres for this real-life tale of Christine Chubbuck, the American television journalist who took her own life on live television in the late 1970s.

The story of Christine Chubbuck comes to the screen in the second of two features, following this month’s documentary Kate Plays Christine. While that film, directed by Robert Greene, focussed upon the story of actress Kate Lyn Sheil as she attempts to play Chubbuck on screen, Campos’ movie is a full dramatisation of the events that led up to the reporter’s on-air suicide back in 1974.

The film opens many months before that infamous event in Florida in the mid-seventies and focusses on her career and personal life prior. Campos, directing from
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Enter a Nightmare in the First Trailer for ‘The Eyes of My Mother’

One of the most divisive films at Sundance this year was Nicolas Pesce‘s The Eyes of My Mother, the latest production from Borderline Films, the team behind the uncompromising character studies Martha Marcy May Marlene, Simon Killer, James White, and more. The film follows a woman whose mother was killed, so she takes revenge in unnerving ways. Ahead of screenings at Fantastic Fest and a theatrical release this December, Magnolia Pictures have now released the first trailer.

We said in our review, “On a personal level, I hated this picture with every fiber of my being. Rarely do I slip into the first-person for these reviews, but for this I make an exception. Hopefully, I will forget the memory of seeing this movie and feeling the way I felt while watching it. In a way, this is a testament to its power and, in another way, a recommendation for
See full article at The Film Stage »

Coming Distractions: Rebecca Hall is a conflicted reporter in the tense first trailer for Christine

Antonio CamposChristine was one of two films at this year’s Sundance Film Festival about the life (and death) of Florida reporter Christine Chubbock. (The other one was Robert Greene’s more meta exploration of Chubbuck’s story, Kate Plays Christine.) Now, The Orchard has released the first trailer for Campos’ film, which looks to be just as fascinatingly nerve-wracking and unpleasant as his previous films, Afterschool and Simon Killer.

Rebecca Hall (The Prestige) plays Chubbuck, a powerful personality who alternates between flirting with her co-worker (Michael C. Hall), and railing against her news station’s “if it bleeds, it leads” approach. Campos’ tone—and Hall’s wild-eyed, committed performance—make it clear that this isn’t a story with a happy ending, even if the trailer stops just short of revealing its grisly end. Christine arrives in theaters on October 14.
See full article at The AV Club »

‘Christine’ Trailer: Rebecca Hall Plays Christine Chubbuck in Antonio Campos’ New Film

‘Christine’ Trailer: Rebecca Hall Plays Christine Chubbuck in Antonio Campos’ New Film
Afterschool director Antonio Campos follows up his unnervingly hypnotic film Simon Killer with Christine. Campo’s third feature premiered at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, where it was praised as a brutal, intimate character study with a tremendous performance from Rebecca Hall (The Gift) as Christine Chubbuck, a reporter who committed suicide on the air in 1974. The independent drama, which […]

The post ‘Christine’ Trailer: Rebecca Hall Plays Christine Chubbuck in Antonio Campos’ New Film appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

‘Christine’ Trailer: Rebecca Hall Is a Woman on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown in Antonio Campos’ Disturbing Drama

  • Indiewire
‘Christine’ Trailer: Rebecca Hall Is a Woman on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown in Antonio Campos’ Disturbing Drama
Easily the strangest coincidence at Sundance this year was the emergence of two films about Christine Chubbuck, a reporter who shot herself on the air in 1974: Robert Greene’s “Kate Plays Christine” and Antonio Campos’ “Christine.” Greene’s quasi-documentary, which stars indie mainstay Kate Lyn Sheil in the title role, hit theaters first, while Campos’ more conventional drama is set to arrive next month. Watch its trailer below.

Read More: Christine Chubbuck: Video Exists of Reporter’s On-Air Suicide That Inspired Two Sundance Films

Rebecca Hall delivers an affecting performance as a woman at her wit’s end in the film, which is sometimes difficult to watch as it charts her downward mental trajectory. The trailer somewhat underplays this at first, beginning in lighthearted fashion before showing Chubbuck’s descent into depression.

Read More: The Orchard Picks Up Antonio Campos’ ‘Christine’ and Aims for Next Year’s Oscars Race

Michael C. Hall,
See full article at Indiewire »

If It Bleeds, It Leads In First Trailer For ‘Christine’ Starring Rebecca Hall & Michael C. Hall

The true story of Florida TV news reporter Christine Chubbuck has captured more than one filmmaker’s imagination. Earlier this year saw the release of the meta-movie “Kate Plays Christine” which is as much about the nature of telling Chubbuck’s story as the events leading up to her on-air suicide. But Antonio Campos (“Afterschool,” “Simon Killer“) is telling Chubbuck’s story from beginning to end with “Christine,” which is riding into the fall season following some big buzz at Sundance Film Festival and the Toronto International Film Festival.

Continue reading If It Bleeds, It Leads In First Trailer For ‘Christine’ Starring Rebecca Hall & Michael C. Hall at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »
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