Arbitrage (2012) - News Poster

(2012)

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Win Passes To The Advance Screening Of The Foreigner In St. Louis

The Foreigner is a gripping and relevant action thriller directed by a master of the smart action genre, Martin Campbell (Casino Royale and Goldeneye.) Justice, retribution and redemption are at the heart of this provocative story of two men whose hidden pasts explode in the present.

The film marks a blazing return to the screen by Jackie Chan (the Rush Hour trilogy, Skiptrace) and Pierce Brosnan (Tomorrow Never Dies, The November Man), two actors in roles that take full advantage of and build upon their legendary star status.

(Left to Right) Jackie Chan as Quan and Pierce Brosnan as Hennessy at Hennessy’s office in The Foreigner

The film tells the story of humble London restaurant owner Quan (Chan), whose long-buried past erupts in a revenge-fueled vendetta when the only person left for him to love — his teenage daughter — is taken from him in a senseless act of politically-motivated terrorism.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Wamg Giveaway – Win The Dinner Blu-ray – Stars Richard Gere

Based on the international best seller of the same name, The Dinner, a dark pyshological thiller about how far parents will go to protect their children, arrives on Blu-ray (plus Digital HD) and DVD on August 8th from Lionsgate. Boasting powerful performances from an all-star cast, including Golden Globe winner Richard Gere (2003, Best Actor – Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, Chicago), Oscar nominee Laura Linney (2007, Best Actress, The Savages), Oscar nominee Steve Coogan (2013, Best Picture,Philomena), Oscar nominee Chloë Sevigny (1999, Best Supporting Actress, Boys Don’t Cry), and Golden Globe nominee Rebecca Hall (2009, Best Actress – Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, Vicky Christina Barcelona), the film was nominated for Best Film at the 2017 Berlin International Film Festival. Written and directed by Oscar nominee Oren Moverman (2009, Best Writing, Original Screenplay, The Messenger), The Dinner Blu-ray and DVD include audio commentary with Moverman and Linney and a photo gallery and will be available for
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Dinner Starring Richard Gere and Rebecca Hall Arrives on Blu-ray and DVD August 8th

Based on the international best seller of the same name, The Dinner, a dark pyshological thiller about how far parents will go to protect their children, arrives on Blu-ray (plus Digital HD) and DVD on August 8from Lionsgate. Boasting powerful performances from an all-star cast, including Golden Globe winner Richard Gere (2003, Best Actor – Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, Chicago), Oscar nominee Laura Linney (2007, Best Actress, The Savages), Oscar nominee Steve Coogan (2013, Best Picture,Philomena), Oscar nominee Chloë Sevigny (1999, Best Supporting Actress, Boys Don’t Cry), and Golden Globe nominee Rebecca Hall (2009, Best Actress – Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, Vicky Christina Barcelona), the film was nominated for Best Film at the 2017 Berlin International Film Festival. Written and directed by Oscar nominee Oren Moverman (2009, Best Writing, Original Screenplay, The Messenger), The Dinner Blu-ray and DVD include audio commentary with Moverman and Linney and a photo gallery and will be available for the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

French Model Laetitia Casta Is Married! Get All the Details on the Secret Ceremony

French Model Laetitia Casta Is Married! Get All the Details on the Secret Ceremony
Another day, another celebrity wedding to report! It’s confirmed that French model-turned-actress Laetitia Casta tied the knot to French actor Louis Garrel in a very intimate, super-secret ceremony in Lumio, Corsica.

Le nozze segrete di #LaetitiaCasta e #LouisGarrel; il nuovo amore di @FinallyMario; le confessioni di @_AnnaTatangelo_ … #SolosuChi pic.twitter.com/VcI5g7hrKZ

— Chi Magazine (@chimagazine) June 14, 2017

They said ‘I do’ on Saturday at a ceremony at the mayor’s office and afterward partied at a beach-themed reception on the island of Spano. They matched the bohemian theme of the wedding with their simple, relaxed style choices. Casta
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Norman Review

Author: Stefan Pape

Quietly, Richard Gere is consistently making rather good movies, telling interesting stories and taking on nuanced, intriguing roles. From The Benefactor to Arbitrage (let’s just forget The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel for now) – he’s tackling intimate character studies, and his latest, Joseph Cedar’s Norman, is no different.

Gere plays the eponymous protagonist, a professional chancer and over-enthused fixer – only problem is, nobody will actually let him get close enough to fix anything. Until he meets Eshel (Lior Ashkenazi), an Israeli politician spending some time in New York, touched by Norman’s offer to buy him a pair of shoes. Three years pass, and Eshel is now an influential world leader, as the Prime Minister of his native country, and when he returns to the States to meet the President, Norman shows up at a function – and they remember each other well. To have
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Exclusive: Richard Gere talks his new film Norman, working in New York and not being drawn to big blockbusters

Author: Scott Davis

One of the very best actors of his generation, Richard Gere has appeared in over 50 films in a career that spans four decades. Famed for his roles in such classics as An Officer and A Gentleman, Pretty Woman and Chicago, the Golden Globe winner has taken on some smaller films in recent years that have gained him a new audience such as Time Out of Mind, Arbitrage and his new film, Norman, which is released in UK cinemas this week.

The film tells the story of Norman Oppenheimer (Gere), a small time “fixer” who becomes close to a young Israeli politician. Over the course of three years, their relationship changes and when the politician becomes a hugely influential world leader, Norman’s life (and his lies) begin to unravel…

Speaking exclusively to HeyUGuys’ Scott Davis, Gere talks about his love of the quirky films he has been involved with recently,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Beyond ‘Wonder Woman’: 8 Actresses Who Deserve to Be Cast in Blockbusters, From Ruth Negga to Teresa Palmer

Beyond ‘Wonder Woman’: 8 Actresses Who Deserve to Be Cast in Blockbusters, From Ruth Negga to Teresa Palmer
Newly minted blockbuster superstar Gal Gadot was hardly a household name when she was picked to play Wonder Woman in DC’s Extended Universe, including turns in “Batman v Superman” and “Justice League” and a starring role in the studio’s newest smash hit, “Wonder Woman.” Best known to action-loving audiences for her supporting roles in the “Fast and Furious” franchise, the former Israeli soldier is now a bonafide breakout, thanks to her work in the long-awaited and instantly beloved superhero film. Fortunately, she’s not the only actress who made the jump from rising star to tentpole leading lady.

Oscar winner Alicia Vikander is toplining the newly re-launched “Tomb Raider” franchise, while “Kingsman” and “Star Trek Beyond” standout Sofia Boutella will star in the upcoming “The Mummy” reboot and presumably continue on in the planned “Dark Universe” franchise. Daisy Ridley has handily taken over chief badass status on the
See full article at Indiewire »

Promise of Polish Production Rebates Boosts Local Entertainment Sector

Promise of Polish Production Rebates Boosts Local Entertainment Sector
Poland is on the brink of its biggest push to become an international film and TV production hotspot thanks to upcoming 25% cash rebates touted as the single missing element holding back an industry bursting at the seams with energy.

Consider these indicators: 2016 set a Polish box office record with more than 50 million admissions and five local movies among the top 10; in February, Agnieszka Holland’s murder mystery “Spoor” scooped the Berlin Silver Bear; in March, “The Art of Loving,” a biopic of Poland’s pioneering communist-era sex therapist Michalina Wislocka, soared to become this year’s top grosser to date, with more than 1.7 million admissions as of the end of March; and Pawel Pawlikowski, whose “Ida” scooped Poland’s first foreign-language Oscar in 2015, is back behind the camera in his native country on new film “Cold War.”

“The production incentive is crucial,” says Polish Film Institute general director Magdalena Sroka,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tribeca review: The Dinner serves up high drama with Richard Gere and Laurie Linney

It’s a high drama between salad and entree in filmmaker Oren Moverman’s The Dinner. Set in the kind of restaurant that you have to kill someone to get a reservation, two couples meet for great food and even better conversation. And none of them will ever be the same by the time the check arrives. Richard Gere and Laura Linney head the cast as two alpha characters in roles that are a standard part of each actor’s standard repertoire. Think Gere in Arbitrage and Linney in Mystic River. Gere is a popular Congressman on the eve of his run for...read more
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

UTA Signs Peabody-Winning Director Eugene Jarecki (Exclusive)

UTA Signs Peabody-Winning Director Eugene Jarecki (Exclusive)
Filmmaker Eugene Jarecki has signed with UTA, The Hollywood Reporter has exclusively learned. He previously was with CAA.

Both of his documentaries — Why We Fight, about the rise of the military-industrial complex, and The House I Live In, about the war on drugs — won Sundance Grand Jury Prizes and Peabody Awards. His other credits include the Emmy-winning HBO documentary Reagan and The Trials of Henry Kissinger, which won an award from Amnesty International and was nominated for an Independent Spirit Award.

Jarecki, the brother of fellow filmmakers Andrew Jarecki (The Jinx) and Nicholas Jarecki (Arbitrage), will...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Review: ‘Norman’ Showcases Richard Gere In Peak Form

Together, writer/director Joseph Cedar and lead actor Richard Gere craft a singularly memorable character in Norman Oppenheimer, a lonely New York “businessman” with loose connections and an insatiable drive for success. Cedar builds his film Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer as a modern adaptation of the “Court Jew” archetype, in which a Jewish figure befriends a man of power, only to be betrayed in the end.

It’s not really a spoiler if it’s all in the title. There’s to be only sadness at the end of this funny, bittersweet story. Norman sports white Apple headphones hanging from his ears as he makes phone call after phone call, bending the truths of his friendships and influences to whoever will listen. He’s got a nephew (Michael Sheen) who appeases him and a slew of Jewish men who wield power and
See full article at The Film Stage »

Richard Gere Has A New Career, Thanks To Two Israeli Filmmakers

Richard Gere Has A New Career, Thanks To Two Israeli Filmmakers
This is the story of how two Israeli filmmakers transformed a Buddhist movie star into Bob Dylan, a New York homeless man, a Manhattan Jewish fixer, and a politician with family issues. It started when Oren Moverman wrote “I’m Not There” with director Todd Haynes, who cast Richard Gere as one of six versions of Bob Dylan.

Several years later, Gere spotted Moverman across a crowded room. “It was an Academy event in New York,” Gere said. “It was a cocktail thing for new members.” Moverman introduced him to Oscar-nominated Joseph Cedar (”Footnote”). They wound up talking Middle East politics. “The three of us were getting along great,” said Gere, who told the men, “If you want to do something that has to do with the Middle East, even in a tangential way, talk to me.”

Read More: ‘Arbitrage’: Richard Gere Talks Indie Filmmaking and VOD

Before they parted ways,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Richard Gere Has A New Career, Thanks To Two Israeli Filmmakers

Richard Gere Has A New Career, Thanks To Two Israeli Filmmakers
This is the story of how two Israeli filmmakers transformed a Buddhist movie star into Bob Dylan, a New York homeless man, a Manhattan Jewish fixer, and a politician with family issues. It started when Oren Moverman wrote “I’m Not There” with director Todd Haynes, who cast Richard Gere as one of six versions of Bob Dylan.

Several years later, Gere spotted Moverman across a crowded room. “It was an Academy event in New York,” Gere said. “It was a cocktail thing for new members.” Moverman introduced him to Oscar-nominated Joseph Cedar (”Footnote”). They wound up talking Middle East politics. “The three of us were getting along great,” said Gere, who told the men, “If you want to do something that has to do with the Middle East, even in a tangential way, talk to me.”

Read More: ‘Arbitrage’: Richard Gere Talks Indie Filmmaking and VOD

Before they parted ways,
See full article at Indiewire »

Susan Sarandon joins Ray Donovan cast for season 5

Following her stellar performance as Bette Davis on FX’s Feud, Oscar winner Susan Sarandon will be making another trip into the world of TV. The iconic actress has signed on to join the cast of Showtime’s hit series Ray Donovan for its forthcoming fifth season.

According to Showtime (via The Wrap), Sarandon will play the recurring role of Samantha Winslow, a strong and focused motion picture studio head. It remains to be seen how Winslow’s path will cross with the titular character, but one would assume that Donovan, a professional fixer for rich and famous Los Angeles residents, will probably end up doing a job for her.

While primarily known for her work in such films as Thelma & Louise, Dead Man Walking, Stepmom, Arbitrage, Tammy and more, Sarandon is far from inexperienced when it comes to TV. Over the course of her career, Sarandon has popped up
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘The Dinner’ Review: Steve Coogan and Richard Gere Are Enraged Siblings in Oren Moverman’s Intense Family Drama — Berlinale 2017

‘The Dinner’ Review: Steve Coogan and Richard Gere Are Enraged Siblings in Oren Moverman’s Intense Family Drama — Berlinale 2017
Oren Moverman is responsible for two of the most impressive American screenplays of the past 10 years, “I’m Not There.” and “Love & Mercy,” both of which turn ambitious approaches to personal stories into surprisingly accessible dramas. As a director, Moverman has shown a rougher edge.

His first two features, “The Messenger” and “Rampart,” were gritty, intimate stories of angry men screwed by the system that employs them (the military and the police force, respectively), while 2014’s “Time Out of Mind” took a similar approach to a man rejected by the system altogether (Richard Gere, playing a decrepit homeless man in New York). Moverman assembles these rickety dramas in piecemeal, gradually developing psychological tension out from the moments that form their lives, like a series of sparklers ignited one by one until they form a blazing whole.

His latest effort, “The Dinner,” is a firecracker from the start. While hobbled by
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Birth of a Nation’ Producers Answer Questions About The Film’s Challenges, Including Nate Parker

‘The Birth of a Nation’ Producers Answer Questions About The Film’s Challenges, Including Nate Parker
I was curious to see how “The Birth of a Nation” — which I first saw at Sundance, where it drew two standing ovations and won the jury and audience prizes — would play for a real audience; in this case, at UCLA Extension’s fall screening series Sneak Previews.

As I watched the film again, I recognized the power of this handsomely mounted movie. Writer-director Nate Parker carefully crafted the (mostly) historically accurate story to show how, in 1831, the charismatic and educated slave Nat Turner (Parker) preached the gospel around his Virginia county, to the enrichment of his childhood playmate and master Samuel Turner (Armie Hammer), in order to placate the local restless slave population, many of them living under far worse conditions.

He witnessed horror after horror, including the brutal gang rape of his beloved wife (Aja Naomi King), which eventually sent him on a mission of righteous vengeance from the Lord.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘The Birth of a Nation’ Producers Answer Questions About The Film’s Challenges, Including Nate Parker

‘The Birth of a Nation’ Producers Answer Questions About The Film’s Challenges, Including Nate Parker
I was curious to see how “The Birth of a Nation” — which I first saw at Sundance, where it drew two standing ovations and won the jury and audience prizes — would play for a real audience; in this case, at UCLA Extension’s fall screening series Sneak Previews.

As I watched the film again, I recognized the power of this handsomely mounted movie. Writer-director Nate Parker carefully crafted the (mostly) historically accurate story to show how, in 1831, the charismatic and educated slave Nat Turner (Parker) preached the gospel around his Virginia county, to the enrichment of his childhood playmate and master Samuel Turner (Armie Hammer), in order to placate the local restless slave population, many of them living under far worse conditions.

He witnessed horror after horror, including the brutal gang rape of his beloved wife (Aja Naomi King), which eventually sent him on a mission of righteous vengeance from the Lord.
See full article at Indiewire »

Giveaway – Win The Keeping Room on DVD

To celebrate the release of The Keeping Room, which releases on digital download 10th October and on DVD 17th October, we have a copy of the DVD up for grabs courtesy of Lionsgate Home Entertainment!

In this radically reimagined American Western set towards the end of the Civil War, Southerner Augusta (Brit Marling, Arbitrage, The East) encounters two renegade, drunken soldiers (Sam Worthington, Avatar & Kyle Soller, BBC’s “Poldark”) who are on a mission of pillage and violence. After escaping an attempted assault, Augusta races back to the isolated farmhouse that she shares with her sister Louise (Hailee Steinfeld, True Grit, Pitch Perfect 2) and their female slave Mad (newcomer Muna Otaru.) When the pair of soldiers track Augusta down intent on exacting revenge, the trio of women are forced to take up arms to fend off their assailants, finding ways to resourcefully defend their home––and themselves––as the
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

'Birth of a Nation' Review: Slave-Rebellion Drama Will Leave You Stunned

'Birth of a Nation' Review: Slave-Rebellion Drama Will Leave You Stunned
Here's a tough question: Do you judge Nate Parker's The Birth of a Nation as a film, or put the man behind it on trial as a former student at Penn State in 1999 who was accused of raping an 18-year-old woman – a crime for which he was acquitted. I'll leave the playing God stuff to social media, where it thrives, and stick to what's onscreen which, by any standard, is a monumental achievement.

The Birth of a Nation is a passion project for Parker, who labored for seven years
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Inside Nate Parker's Troubled Childhood and Rise to Hollywood After College Rape Case

  • PEOPLE.com
Nate Parker became an overnight sensation in Hollywood after his film The Birth of a Nation, which he wrote, starred in, directed and produced, earned universal praise, scoring an unprecedented $17 million deal at the Sundance Film Festival and earning him glowing comparisons to Orson Welles. But the acclaim has been overshadowed by his involvement in a 1999 rape case after recent reports surfaced that the woman had committed suicide in 2012, shining a harsh spotlight on a man who endured a troubled childhood before charting his path to stardom. Birth of a Nation, a historical drama that tells the story of Nat Turner's famous 1831 slave revolt,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »
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