Knuckle (2011) - News Poster

(2011)

News

Review: Jason Bourne

  • Comicmix
There is a weight and heaviness to being Jason Bourne, nee David Webb, given that your life is constantly being manipulated and/or endangered. Trust doesn’t come easily and those around him tend to get hurt. Through three films, we’ve thrilled to Matt Damon’s interpretation of Robert Ludlum’s espionage hero in part thanks to the excellent filmmaking from directors Paul Greengrass and Doug Liman.

After skipping an installment that shifted the focus to a new agent played by Jeremy Renner, Greengrass and Damon returned this summer with Jason Bourne. Things have changed since 2007’s The Bourne Ultimatum as skullduggery has increasingly gone digital so the lengths required to keep secrets buried have to go further. The film, out now from Universal Home Entertainment, explores what all that means.

Bourne has been in hiding these last few years, travelling the world as a bare-knuckled boxer, using physical
See full article at Comicmix »

Storyville orders Daisy Asquith doc

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: Storyville, Irish Film Board commission is first production from Alan Maher at Roads Entertainment.

BBC4 doc strand Storyville and the Irish Film Board (Ifb) have ordered a documentary from Crazy About One Direction-director Daisy Asquith.

After the Dance will chart Asquith’s investigation into her own complicated family history on the west coast of Ireland.

The feature-length film will trace the fallout experienced by Asquith’s family after her mother was conceived to unmarried parents and adopted, unpicking a past dominated by secrets and shame and involving a new family in County Clare.

Asquith said: “My grandmother suffered an appalling injustice at the hands of the Catholic church, being forced to give up her baby after a secret pregnancy she dared tell no-one in her family about.

“The shame at these stories still exists, which makes this a tough film to make. But I make it with love and pride in my Irish family.”

After
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Longinotto starts Dreamcatchers

  • ScreenDaily
Rise Films is reteaming with Longinotto for Us prostitution documentary.

London-based production company Rise Films is reteaming with Kim Longinotto for her latest feature documentary, The Dreamcatchers.

Principal photography started this week in Chicago, marking Longinotto’s first film shot in the Us.

The film will follow two former prostitutes who now help women get out of prostitution and teach vulnerable girls how to avoid sexual exploitation.

The veteran filmmaker will have unparalleld access to sex workers in Chicago’s toughest neighborhoods. Rise has already worked in Chicago with Steve James’ The Interrupters, about gang violence.

Rise previously worked with Longinotto’s 2009 Sundance prize winner Rough Aunties.

On The Dreamcatchers, Rise’s Teddy Leifer produces with Lisa Stevens; John Stack serves as associate producer.

Finance comes from Impact Partners; executive producers are Dan Cogan, Geralyn Dreyfous and Regina Scully. (Rise recently worked with Dreyfous and Scully on The Invisble War.)

The Dreamcatchers
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Longinotto starts Dreamcatchers shoot

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: Rise Films is reteaming with Longinotto for Us prostitution documentary.

London-based production company Rise Films is reteaming with Kim Longinotto for her latest feature documentary, The Dreamcatchers.

Principal photography started this week in Chicago, marking Longinotto’s first film shot in the Us.

The film will follow two former prostitutes who now help women get out of prostitution and teach vulnerable girls how to avoid sexual exploitation.

The veteran filmmaker will have unparalleld access to sex workers in Chicago’s toughest neighborhoods. Rise has already worked in Chicago with Steve James’ The Interrupters, about gang violence.

Rise previously worked with Longinotto’s 2009 Sundance prize winner Rough Aunties.

On The Dreamcatchers, Rise’s Teddy Leifer produces with Lisa Stevens; John Stack serves as associate producer.

Finance comes from Impact Partners; executive producers are Dan Cogan, Geralyn Dreyfous and Regina Scully. (Rise recently worked with Dreyfous and Scully on The Invisble War.)

The Dreamcatchers
See full article at ScreenDaily »

King of the Travellers – review

A drama about bareknuckle fighting in the Traveller community has some crowd-pleasing moments, but there's not a lot to it

This feels like a fictionalisation of Ian Palmer's 2011 doc, Knuckle, about rival clans of itinerants holding bare-fisted donnybrooks in Irish laybys, but the tone is erratic. Writer-director Mark O'Connor aims for authenticity, tying the Travellers to those other migrant labourers persecuted by locals. Yet he stumbles over a vein of notionally crowd-pleasing comedy that recalls Guy Ritchie's Snatch, with its gold-chained chancers doing mushrooms in the woods. A flibbertigibbet: it arrives with a twinkle in its eye, but little else between its cauliflower ears.

Rating: 2/5

DramaComedyMike McCahill

guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

TV highlights 05/03/2012

  • The Guardian - TV News
Riots And Revolutions: My Arab Journey | Whitechapel | Dirk Gently | Storyville: Knuckle – Bare Fist Fighting | Out On A Limo | Keith Allen Meets Nick Griffin

Riots And Revolutions: My Arab Journey

9pm, BBC3

Postwar China premier Zhou Enlai's – possibly apocryphal – assessment of the effects of the French revolution ("It's too soon to say") seems exponentially more applicable to the upheavals that began roughly this time last year in the Middle East. Nevertheless, Nel Hedayat has a go. In the first of a two-part survey of the Arab spring, she visits Bahrain and Egypt. In the former, she meets the people maintaining their struggle for democracy, and in the latter, young women celebrating the overthrow of the tyranny that oppressed them and, er, advocating the imposition of Sharia law. Andrew Mueller

Whitechapel

9pm, ITV1

The final episode sees Chandler and Miles at loggerheads over an investigation of the serial murder of victims
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Winners Of The 9th Annual Irish Film & Television Awards Announced

  • FlicksNews.net
The ninth annual Irish Film & Television Awards took place tonight at a Gala Awards Ceremony held at the Convention Centre Dublin.

In the field of film 'The Guard' was the big winner of the night receiving the Ifta for Best Film, with writer/director John Michael McDonagh named Best Director, Best Screenwriter and the Irish Film Board Rising Star for his feature directorial debut. Fionnula Flannagan who was honoured with a lifetime achievement award also won best supporting actress for her part in 'The Guard'.

Michael Fassbender picked up best actor for 'Shame' while Saoirse Ronan picked up best actress for her role in 'Hanna.' Ryan Gosling picked up the best international actor for 'Drive,' Chris O'Dowd picked up best supporting actor for 'Bridesmaids', and Glenn Close picked up best international actress for 'Albert Nobbs.'

'Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy
See full article at FlicksNews.net »

The Guard, Michael Fassbender: Irish Film Award Winners

Brendan Gleeson, The Guard The Guard, Glenn Close, Ryan Gosling Win: Irish Film Awards 2012 Film Categories Best Film Albert Nobbs, Alan Moloney, Bonnie Curtis, Julie Lynn, Glenn Close Charlie Casanova, Terry McMahon Stella Days, Jackie Larkin, Leslie McKimm * The Guard, Ed Guiney, Andrew Lowe, Chris Cark, Flora Fernandez Marengo Best Director Rebecca Daly, The Other Side of Sleep * John Michael McDonagh, The Guard Terry McMahon, Charlie Casanova Thaddeus O'Sullivan, Stella Days Best Screenplay John Banville, Glenn Close, Albert Nobbs * John Michael McDonagh, The Guard Terry McMahon, Charlie Casanova Antoine O'Flaherta, Stella Days Best Actor * Michael Fassbender, Shame Brendan Gleeson, The Guard Ciarán Hinds, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy Martin Sheen, Stella Days Best Actress Aoife Duffin, Behold the Lamb Antonia Campbell Hughes, The Other Side of Sleep Marcella Plunkett, Stella Days * Saoirse Ronan, Hanna Best Supporting Actor Liam Cunningham, The Guard Brendan Gleeson, Albert Nobbs Ciarán Hinds, The Debt * Chris O'Dowd,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Irish Film and Television Academy Awards 2012: Nominations: Albert Nobbs

Albert Nobbs and the other nominations for the 2012 Irish Film and Television Academy Awards have been announced. The 9th Annual Irish Film and Television Awards (IFTAs) “sole aim is to celebrate Ireland’s notably talented film and television community. The ceremony is considered to be one of Ireland’s most prestigious awards event, and can be viewed as the Irish equivalent to the American Oscars.” The awards ceremony will be held on February 11, 2012 at the Convention Centre Dublin (Ccd).

The full listing of the 2012 Irish Film and Television Awards is below.

Film Categories

Best Film

Albert NobbsAlan Moloney, Bonnie Curtis, Julie Lynn and Glenn Close (Parallel Film & TV Productions)

Charlie CasanovaTerry McMahon (Source Productions)

Stella DaysJackie Larkin & Leslie McKimm (Newgrange Pictures)

The GuardEd Guiney, Andrew Lowe, Chris Larke, Flore Fernandez Marengo(Element Pictures)

Director Film

Rebecca Daly – The Other Side of Sleep (Fastnet Films)

John Michael McDonagh
See full article at Film-Book »

TV And The Novel: Not-So-Strange Bedfellows

TV And The Novel: Not-So-Strange Bedfellows
Michael Chabon's "The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay" could be coming to a screen near you.

According to Collider, director Stephen Daldry wants to turn the novel into a miniseries for HBO.

"I would love to do something for TV," he said. "I wanna do Kavalier & Clay on HBO as an eight-parter. It'll be so much better as a series, honestly."

There's just one catch -- Daldry doesn't have the rights to the book. Paramount does -- though Daldry himself was signed on at one point to direct a film version, the project has continued to languish.

"I spent a year working on it with Michael Chabon, so we're pretty close," Daldry told Collider. "And the rights, good question. Will Paramount give them to me? I don't know. It'll be a really good one. It'd go great with 'Boardwalk Empire.'"

HBO is already working with Chabon and
See full article at Huffington Post »

Knuckle

“Brothers and cousins fighting brothers and cousins”—this simple statement summarizes generations of hatred and a spellbinding feature documentary that is Knuckle. Filmmaker Ian Palmer was working as a wedding videographer when he was thrown right in the middle of Irish Traveller culture and, within it, the perpetuation of clannish hate expressed most often through violent bare-knuckled fighting among the men. Asked if he would film a fight between rival families, Palmer was sucked still further into the mysterious lives of these Travellers who believe so dearly in the honor of solving problems with their fists....
See full article at PasteMagazine »

Why Irish Fighting Doc 'Knuckle' Gained Interest From Hollywood and HBO

Why Irish Fighting Doc 'Knuckle' Gained Interest From Hollywood and HBO
"Knuckle," documentarian Ian Palmer's portrait of Irish families constantly engaging in bare-knuckle fights, generated immediate industry buzz when it premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January. HBO wanted to adapt its fierce, absurdly proud subjects for a series and Hollywood stars asked about playing them. However, none of this attention necessarily validated "Knuckle" as a movie; it demonstrated that Palmer had chosen ideal characters for pop-culture appropriation. Watching "Knuckle," it's impossible not to realize how their brutality could go mainstream. Palmer spent 10 years following a pair of warring Irish traveler families, the Quinn-McDonaughs and their distant cousins, the Joyces. Both sides are locked into a feud dating back to 1992, when a drunken brawl in London resulted in the death of a Joyce and the incarceration of a Quinn. However, that incidentonly served to resurrect lingering animosities from half a century...
See full article at Indiewire »

Director Ian Palmer and Star James Quinn McDonagh Knuckle Interview

Sometimes men fight just to fight. Tempers flare and punches are thrown, and a lot of time the biggest damage is done to egos more than anything else. Filmmaker Ian Palmer found a situation in Ireland where much more damage is done to the bodies and the faces of the fighters that live in a constant sort of conflict with neighboring families. Called Travellers, Gypsies, or any number of things, these nomadic people have long-standing feuds that are settled with individual fights between two representatives of a family in a somewhat civilized stand-up fist fight. Over the course of more than a decade Palmer followed the Quinn McDonaghs and their champion, James, and compiled a documentary simply titled Knuckle, which opens in limited release this weekend and on VOD. Earlier this year I had the chance to sit down with James Quinn McDonagh and Ian, and after the jump you
See full article at Collider.com »

Review: Understated & Powerful Documentary 'Knuckle' Is A Knockout

Given the recent explosion of mixed martial arts in the last several years, it seems like a no-brainer that someone would make a documentary about real-life pugilists who don’t just fight but have a real, deep-rooted beef with one another. But Ian Palmer’s documentary “Knuckle” isn’t a celebration of competition, or even the chronicle of a journey some ambitious hopeful makes en route to victory, or even defeat; rather, it takes a long and in many ways tragic look at two warring Irish clans who have engaged in a rivalry for so long that they keep it going without ever knowing why, and certainly without considering stopping it. A chronicle of two intertwined family histories whose ongoing conflict is as raw and unrefined as the fists of the men who fight, “Knuckle” is an understated but powerful look at a world people know little about, in a
See full article at The Playlist »

Exclusive: Ian Palmer and James Quinn McDonagh Talk Knuckle

A generations old Irish blood feud is settled by bare-knuckle boxing in this new documentary, in select theaters December 9th

James Quinn McDonagh and Paddy "The Lurcher" Joyce. Names that demand attention. Men related by blood but separated by a feud that dates back generations. As the heads of rival families, they train to represent their feuding Irish traveling clans, in their long-standing history of violent bare-knuckle boxing.

With Knuckle, filmmaker Ian Palmer presents a hard-edged portrait of Irish Traveller male culture and explores the bond of loyalty, the need for revenge, and the pressures to fight for the honor of your family name.

Irish Travellers are normally silent about certain parts of their lifestyle and this is a rare chance to step inside one of the world's most vibrant and elusive communities. Never before has such a portrayal of their fighting traditions been committed to film, as Ian Palmer
See full article at MovieWeb »

'Knuckle' Director Ian Palmer Talks Bringing The Documentary To TV, Reveals Vin Diesel Was Interested In Movie Rights

Aside from maybe Errol Morris' "Tabloid," there is no story you'll see in a docmentary this year as astonishingly odd and visceral as that in Ian Palmer's "Knuckle." But unlike Morris' film, which centers on a single incident in the already quirky life of one woman, Palmer's film tracks the simmering real life feuds between multiple families that has deloved in an endless series of bare knuckle fights between warring members. In "Knuckle," Palmer weaves an incredible tale, captured from more than a decade's worth of footage he shot as an invited witness to the matches, centered around the Quinn-McDonaugh family of Irish travellers and their battles with the Joyce and Nevins clans. The film is raw, brutal stuff with men of all ages -- from lads barely out of their teenage years to grandfathers -- meeting every few months to settle a variety of scores in bloody
See full article at The Playlist »

The real Fighting Irish in documentary ‘Knuckle’ - Video (IrishCentral)

Forget all those criminal Cockney cliches populating Guy Ritchie movies. If you want to see what a real life tough as nails subculture looks like take yourself along to the movies and see Knuckle, which opens in New York, Los Angeles and Austin, Texas on Friday. A you-are-there portrait of a hardy Irish traveling community in Britain and Ireland, it’s a true to life picture of feuding Irish traveling clans and their long-standing history of violent bare-knuckle boxing. First we meet James Quinn McDonagh and Paddy “The Lurcher” Joyce, two men who are related by blood but separated by a family feud that dates back generations and whose origins are mostly long forgotten. As the heads of rival families, they represent what they call their “breeds” through the brutal -- and illegal -- street fights they spend most of their adult lives training for. ------------------------ Read More: Ireland may
See full article at IrishCentral »

Film: Movie Review: Knuckle

Knuckle is a documentary about feuding families of Irish Travelers who settle their grudges with bare-knuckle boxing matches, so it’s bound to be inherently fascinating, regardless of how well it’s assembled. First-time filmmaker Ian Palmer has been following his subjects, the Quinn McDonagh clan, for more than a decade, and the film exhibits both the benefit of that long investment, and the problem that likely kept Palmer at it for so long—there’s no escalation, no conclusion, just a series of brutal bouts in the name of grudges that will never be settled. It’s an involving ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Dialogue: 'Knuckle' Creators Discuss the Difficulties of Filming Real-Life Families Beating the Crap Out of Each Other

In a landscape of movies where actors pretend to beat one another to a bloody pulp, it’s rare – whether or not you see it as a privilege – to watch people on screen actually trade blows. But in Ian Palmer’s Knuckle, audiences watch unflinching depictions of bare-knuckle fights, held in unglamorous locations and shot with unglossy brutality. At the same time, Palmer didn’t merely infiltrate a world of Irish bare-knuckle boxing and milk it of its visceral intensity, but chronicled its emotional underpinnings, as he follows the historic rivalry between two warring clans who can’t seem to resolve differences that began so long ago that the people almost literally have to invent new reasons to keep it going. Movies sat down with director Ian Palmer...

Read More
See full article at Movies.com »

'Knuckle' Creators Discuss the Difficulties of Filming Real-Life Families Beating the Crap Out of Each Other

  • Fandango
In a landscape of movies where actors pretend to beat one another to a bloody pulp, it’s rare – whether or not you see it as a privilege – to watch people on screen actually trade blows. But in Ian Palmer’s Knuckle, audiences watch unflinching depictions of bare-knuckle fights, held in unglamorous locations and shot with unglossy brutality. At the same time, Palmer didn’t merely infiltrate a world of Irish bare-knuckle boxing and milk it of its visceral intensity, but chronicled its emotional underpinnings, as he follows the historic rivalry between two warring clans who can’t seem to resolve differences that began so long ago that the people almost literally have to invent new reasons to keep it going. Movies.com sat down with director Ian Palmer and...

Read More

Read Comments
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites