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As Industry Awards Move Forward, ‘The Shape of Water’ Takes the Lead

As Industry Awards Move Forward, ‘The Shape of Water’ Takes the Lead
The new year has brought the usual wave of guilds and industry groups weighing in on the year’s best work. Editors, art directors, casting directors, writers, makeup artists, and now, producers, have all chimed in this week, with cinematographers, sound mixers, visual effects artists, and directors still to come.

And pay attention. This is momentum week, as Oscar voters receive ballots Friday and will vote for a single pressure-cooked week. It will be pencils down on Jan. 12.

The December circuit made it clear what film is the critical darling of the year: Jordan Peele’s “Get Out,” which has claimed 12 best picture prizes so far. But “critics don’t vote for Oscars” is always an important mantra this time of year. Conversely, the guilds have crossover membership with the film Academy, so it’s worth taking serious note of their choices.

At this point, Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” has reaped the most
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Happy End' Review: Michael Haneke Returns With Another Feel-Bad Drama

'Happy End' Review: Michael Haneke Returns With Another Feel-Bad Drama
Austrian writer-director Michael Haneke has made many a masterpiece – and his latest, Happy End, isn't one of them. Yet this cinematic poke in the eye about an upper class family imploding still exerts a perverse fascination. From early provocations like The Seventh Continent (1989) through later boundary-pushing works like The Piano Teacher, Cache, The White Ribbon, Funny Games (both the original and it's English-language remake) and Amour, the fillmaker specializes in the toxic indifference that can kill a family or society as a whole. He offers no easy answers. As the
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Phantom Thread, The Post, Proud Mary and all of the movies you need to see in January

  • Cineplex
Phantom Thread, The Post, Proud Mary and all of the movies you need to see in JanuaryPhantom Thread, The Post, Proud Mary and all of the movies you need to see in JanuaryAdriana Floridia1/3/2018 2:13:00 Pm

It's time to start a new year at the movies.

2017 was a wonderful year for film, but we're already looking forward to what 2018 has in store. This month we have a variety of art house, action, and sweet bears in blue jackets. Check out the movies you need to see in theatres this January below!

These are the movies you have to see this January:

Phantom Thread

Release Date: January 5th, 2018

For Fans of: Fashion, Romance, Paul Thomas Anderson

See it with: A friend

Daniel Day Lewis has formally announced that Phantom Thread will be his last film, as he's retiring from acting. In his last film performance, he plays a renowned dress
See full article at Cineplex »

In Memoriam: Movie Stars We Lost in 2017

In Memoriam: Movie Stars We Lost in 2017
The past year saw the loss of some renowned character actors, including John Hurt, Bill Paxton and Harry Dean Stanton. We were both shaken and stirred by the death of Roger Moore, who played James Bond more than any other actor. On the other side of the camera, directors Jonathan Demme as well as horror masters Tobe Hooper and George A. Romero died in 2017.

Here’s a month-to-month look at some of the biggest names in the film world who died in 2017.

In January, “The Elephant Man” star Hurt died on Jan. 27. The 77-year old actor also starred in “Alien” and “Midnight Express.” Emmanuelle Riva, the French star of “Hiroshima Mon Amour” and more recently, “Amour,” died on Jan. 27 at 89.

Bill Paxton, who appeared on TV in “Big Love” and in films including “Titanic” and “Aliens,” died Feb. 25. He was just 61.

The Silence of the Lambs” director Demme, who had been suffering from cancer, died April 26 at
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘The Post’ Joins Top 2017 Specialty Box Office Openers

  • Indiewire
“The Post” (20th Century Fox), Steven Spielberg’s recreation of the 1971 Pentagon Papers First Amendment saga, opened strongly in nine theaters over three cities (Washington D.C. logically added to the usual New York and Los Angeles platform dates). On a weekend prior to Christmas that normally is not prime for its core older audience, it scored a strong initial result across the board. Its numbers in the four key usual platform theaters placed it among the biggest limited openers of the year, with likely better results still to come.

Two other openers, Michael Haneke’s “Happy End” (Sony Pictures Classics) and the Christian Bale western “Hostiles” (Entertainment Studios) also braved the tricky playtime to disappointing results. They are competing against multiple already established awards titles that continue to prosper in varying degrees.

The Darkest Hour” (Focus) had its broadest break to date, edging out by a small margin the
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Happy End’ Movie Review: Michael Haneke’s Latest Tackles Social Media

  • The Wrap
‘Happy End’ Movie Review: Michael Haneke’s Latest Tackles Social Media
Michael Haneke‘s “Happy End,” which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in May, lacks the historical heft of “The White Ribbon” or the emotional through-line of “Amour,” both winners of the festival’s Palme d’Or prize. It’s a more austere and enigmatic work about — among many other things — existential malaise among France’s top 1 percent. The compelling film is like the Austrian director’s answer to the age-old question, “What do you get for the man who has everything?” And though his answer is simple, one must put in the work to get there. The film follows the Laurents (as all.
See full article at The Wrap »

The 2018 Foreign Language Oscar Shortlist: 9 Films, Many Snubs and Surprises

  • Indiewire
Whittling down this year’s record 92 foreign-language Oscar submissions to a shortlist of nine was a challenge for the Academy which, under the leadership of new president John Bailey, instituted voting changes for the disparate group of Academy volunteers commandeered by foreign-language committee chair Mark Johnson.

Eight of the films were well-known from festival play and have been racking up awards, most notably European Film Awards winner “The Square.” Two lesser-known films that were not widely predicted made the cut, “Félicité” from Senegal and “The Wound” from South Africa. Steady as they go for Sony Pictures Classics and Magnolia Pictures, which lead the field with three and two films, respectively.

The nine films are listed alphabetically below.

“A Fantastic Woman” (Chile, Sony Pictures Classics)

Berlin debuted Sebastián Lelio’s transgender drama, which won Best Screenplay and played well at Telluride and Toronto.

Félicité” (Senegal, Strand Releasing)

In Alain Gomis’s family drama,
See full article at Indiewire »

The 2018 Foreign Language Oscar Shortlist: 9 Films, Many Snubs and Surprises

The 2018 Foreign Language Oscar Shortlist: 9 Films, Many Snubs and Surprises
Whittling down this year’s record 92 foreign-language Oscar submissions to a shortlist of nine was a challenge for the Academy which, under the leadership of new president John Bailey, instituted voting changes for the disparate group of Academy volunteers commandeered by foreign-language committee chair Mark Johnson.

Eight of the films were well-known from festival play and have been racking up awards, most notably European Film Awards winner “The Square.” Two lesser-known films that were not widely predicted made the cut, “Félicité” from Senegal and “The Wound” from South Africa. Steady as they go for Sony Pictures Classics and Magnolia Pictures, which lead the field with three and two films, respectively.

The nine films are listed alphabetically below.

A Fantastic Woman” (Chile, Sony Pictures Classics)

Berlin debuted Sebastián Lelio’s transgender drama, which won Best Screenplay and played well at Telluride and Toronto.

“Félicité” (Senegal, Strand Releasing)

In Alain Gomis’s family drama,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Michael Haneke Says He’s Not ‘Dark’ but If ‘Happy End’ Disturbs, That’s Your Problem

Michael Haneke Says He’s Not ‘Dark’ but If ‘Happy End’ Disturbs, That’s Your Problem
Michael Haneke received worldwide acclaim and two Oscar nominations for his tragic romance “Amour,” the mesmerizing tale of an elderly couple facing the inevitable specter of death. Though downbeat in the Haneke fashion, “Amour” also registered as the Austrian filmmaker’s most emotionally accessible work. His followup, “Happy End,” found a more mixed response — and yet, for serious Haneke devotees, it should hit all the right buttons. Still, Haneke remains such a singular director that, 30 years into his career, he continues to challenge even his greatest devotees.

For those among us, “Happy End” delivers one of the most enjoyably twisted movies of Haneke’s career. The story of a dysfunctional bourgeois family where self-loathing and suicidal thoughts loom large, it’s a profoundly cynical work so incisive that it renewed a once-familiar element in Haneke’s career trajectory: divisiveness. Following the filmmaker’s back-to-back Palme d’Or wins for “Amour” and “The White Ribbon,
See full article at Indiewire »

Five Foreign-Language Directors Who Have Been to Oscars Before

Five Foreign-Language Directors Who Have Been to Oscars Before
Variety approached five foreign-language directors who have been to the awards circuit before about the changes in their lives and their show business careers since their previous visit to the kudos rodeo whether it was five or 15 years earlier. For some technological advances were in the forefront while for others it was financing. We also asked them if they were interested in taking a path others had before them to Hollywood. The answers may surprise, or enlighten as each director has a unique take on new technology, recognition and of course the motivation and inspiration behind their current films.

Ruben Ostlund

There was a time in the Oscar foreign-language category’s not-too-distant history when the nominating committee fell for films about the sentimental bond between a grandfatherly old man and the bright-eyed boy he takes under his wing — feel-good films such as “Kolya” and “Cinema Paradiso.”

Ruben Ostlund’s “The Square” is not that movie. In fact, it
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Happy End review – gallows humour for all the family

Michael Haneke’s new film finds dark wit in assisted suicide, overdoses and the refugee crisis

Michael Haneke’s new film gleams with cold gallows humour. There’s blunt, rasping comedy to be found in its thematic grimness (Happy End might also be titled Death Wish), though the Austrian director’s bleak worldview won’t be to everyone’s taste. The plot begins with 13 year-old Eve (Fantine Harduin), who is forced to stay with her father Thomas (Mathieu Kassovitz), in Calais, with his new wife and their young child after her mother overdoses. Also living in the Laurent family home is Thomas’s sister, severe real estate developer Anne (Isabelle Huppert), and their depressed father Georges (Jean-Louis Trintignant of Haneke’s Amour), who at a robust 84 is “too healthy” to qualify for the assisted suicide he seeks, and so must make alternative arrangements. Eve moves quietly, watching the adults around her.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

On my radar: Isabelle Huppert’s cultural highlights

The celebrated French actor on Leonard Cohen, Louise Bourgeois, Big Little Lies and Bette Midler on Broadway

Born in Paris, Isabelle Huppert made her big-screen debut in 1972. Since then she has starred in films including Michael Cimino’s Heaven’s Gate (1980), Claude Chabrol’s Madame Bovary (1991), Michael Haneke’s The Piano Teacher (2001) and Amour (2012), and Mia Hansen-Løve’s Things to Come (2016). Huppert has been nominated for 16 César awards, twice winning for best actress, and has won a Bafta and two Cannes best actress awards. Her role in Paul Verhoeven’s controversial Elle (2016) earned Huppert an Academy Award nomination and a Golden Globe. She stars in Haneke’s latest film, Happy End, a black comedy about a bourgeois family living in Calais, in cinemas from 1 December.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Lost in Paris review – Emmanuelle Riva beguiles in this funny little gem

French screen icon joins writer-directors Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon for one of her final appearances

Here is one of the final screen appearances of Emmanuelle Riva, icon of movies from Michael Haneke’s Amour to Gillo Pontecorvo’s Kapò and Alain Resnais’s Hiroshima Mon Amour, who died in January at the age of 89. It is a delectably gentle, elegant, self-effacing performance. Riva plays a lovably scatty old lady called Marthe in this Tati-esque comedy from French writer-directors Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon. The movie they have jointly devised, and in which they star, is a clever, funny and distinctly unworldly comedy with an insouciant line in visual humour.

Fiona (Fiona Gordon) is a young goof from Canada who comes to Paris to visit her similarly away-with-the-fairies aunt Marthe (Riva). A mishap on the banks of, and then in, the Seine leads to an encounter with a romantic tramp
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘The Incredibles 2’ Trailer: Baby Jack-Jack Has Powers of His Own in the Long-Awaited Sequel — Watch

  • Indiewire
‘The Incredibles 2’ Trailer: Baby Jack-Jack Has Powers of His Own in the Long-Awaited Sequel — Watch
13 years later, “The Incredibles” are back. Well, almost — Pixar has released the sequel-come-lately’s teaser trailer, which introduces a superheroic baby to the mix and provides a brief glimpse of his powers (fire, lightning, and lasers are all involved). Watch below.

Read More:Disney’s D23: New Details from ‘Wreck-It Ralph 2,’ ‘Incredibles 2,’ and ‘Toy Story 4’

Here’s the synopsis: “Everyone’s favorite family of superheroes is back in ‘Incredibles 2’ — but this time Helen (voice of Holly Hunter) is in the spotlight, leaving Bob (voice of Craig T. Nelson) at home with Violet (voice of Sarah Vowell) and Dash (voice of Huck Milner) to navigate the day-to-day heroics of ‘normal’ life. It’s a tough transition for everyone, made tougher by the fact that the family is still unaware of baby Jack-Jack’s emerging superpowers. When a new villain hatches a brilliant and dangerous plot, the family and Frozone
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Happy End’ Trailer: Isabelle Huppert and Michael Haneke’s ‘Amour’ Semi-Sequel Probably Isn’t Too Happy — Watch

  • Indiewire
‘Happy End’ Trailer: Isabelle Huppert and Michael Haneke’s ‘Amour’ Semi-Sequel Probably Isn’t Too Happy — Watch
Sony Pictures Classics has released the trailer for “Happy End,” Michael Haneke’s semi-sequel to “Amour.” Isabelle Huppert and Jean-Louis Trintignant reprise their roles in the film, whose title is almost certainly ironic — Haneke’s movies, like “Funny Games” and “The White Ribbon,” are among the most severe in the world. Watch the trailer below.

Read More:‘Happy End’ Review: In This Quasi-Sequel to ‘Amour,’ Michael Haneke is a Master of Bourgeois Despair

Here’s the synopsis, courtesy of AFI Fest: “The Laurent family has issues. Georges (Jean-Louis Trintignant), the aging patriarch of the wealthy Callais clan, is more interested in exiting this world than enjoying it. Anne (Isabelle Huppert) has a repellent adult son to deal with, and Thomas (Mathieu Kassovitz) is having a graphic online affair. The match to this tinderbox of dysfunction is adolescent Eve, who moves in after her mother’s apparent suicide attempt, and in
See full article at Indiewire »

Official Oscar® Submission for Best Foreign Language Film from Austria: ‘Happy Ending’ by Michael…

Official Oscar® Submission for Best Foreign Language Film from Austria: ‘Happy Ending’ by Michael…
Official Oscar® Submission for Best Foreign Language Film from Austria: ‘Happy Ending’ by Michael Haneke“All around us, the world, and we, in its midst, blind.”The Laurent Family in ‘Happy Ending’A snapshot from the life of a bourgeois European family.

What is Michael Haneke’s vision in this film? We have seen his take on the young Adonises in Funny Games, the most devastating picture of modern sociopathology I have ever seen. And his view of the pathological origin of fascism in The White Ribbon, of the political scandal of the police mass murder and civilians turning a blind eye to the plight of Algerians in France in Cache, on sexual pathology run amock in The Piano Teacher.

Happy Ending features the best actors of a generation and of Haneke’s films, Isabelle Huppert (The Piano Teacher), Jean-Louis Trintignant who played the same character in Amour, is now shown from another angle,
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

The 20 Saddest Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Amour’ to ‘Million Dollar Baby’

  • Indiewire
The 20 Saddest Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Amour’ to ‘Million Dollar Baby’
As much as we all love a stunning tracking shot or an impeccably stylized thriller, even the most discerning cinephiles have to admit: Sometimes, you just want a good cry. Often it’s the most gut-wrenching movies that remain in our collective cultural memory the longest; “Sophie’s Choice,” “Terms of Endearment,” and “Schindler’s List,” to name just a few. Even in an age when auteur-driven driven sci-fi and superhero franchises reign supreme, Hollywood will always love a good old-fashioned tearjerker. Which is why we thought it necessary to single out some of the saddest movies of the century — so far.

Read More:The 20 Scariest Movie Scenes of the 21st Century

Though it might sound trite, one doesn’t have to give up gorgeous cinematography or a tightly-wound script in order to be moved. Not only do the films on this list find beauty in the most heartbreaking of human experiences,
See full article at Indiewire »

Europe’s Oscar Films Span Spectrum From Serious to Comedies

Europe’s Oscar Films Span Spectrum From Serious to Comedies
“World cinema” may be the official remit of the foreign-language film category, but it’s fair to say Oscar has travelled some parts of the globe more thoroughly than others. However much the voting system is tweaked to expand the branch’s horizons, the award retains a reputation for Eurocentricity: in its 61 years of competitive existence, it has gone to a European production 51 times.

It’s not an inexplicable bias, of course, when you weigh up the number of developed national film industries among continents — after all, European countries account for well over a third of this year’s 92 foreign-language submissions, dwarfing the combined number of entries from Africa, for example. Either way, it’s a dominance that is likely to continue this year, with Europe holding a number of the most hotly fancied contenders in what remains a wide-open race.

Unsurprisingly, France holds the record for scoring the most nominations in the category’s history, with 37. It
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscars 2018: The Academy Lists Record 92 Foreign Language Contenders

Oscars 2018: The Academy Lists Record 92 Foreign Language Contenders
The final deadline for submitting each country’s film for consideration for the foreign-language Oscar was October 2. Last year 85 were finally deemed eligible by the Academy; this year the number is a record 92. Haiti, Honduras, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mozambique, Senegal and Syria are first-time entrants. These films are vying for the initial shortlist of 9, and final five nominations to be announced on January 23. See the final list below.

Read More:Oscar Announces Changes for Foreign-Film Voting: Now Simpler! (Sort Of.)

The frontrunners include Sweden selected Ruben Östlund’s hilarious Palme d’Or-winner “The Square” (October 27, Magnolia Pictures), an art-world satire shot in majority Swedish with some English from stars Claes Bang, Elisabeth Moss, and Dominic West, thus giving Östlund another shot after “Force Majeure” was a surprise 2015 Oscar omission.

Germany’s choice, Fatih Akin’s “In the Fade” (December 27, Magnolia Pictures), won Best Actress for Diane Kruger at Cannes.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Oscars 2018: The Academy Lists Record 92 Foreign Language Contenders

Oscars 2018: The Academy Lists Record 92 Foreign Language Contenders
The final deadline for submitting each country’s film for consideration for the foreign-language Oscar was October 2. Last year 85 were finally deemed eligible by the Academy; this year the number is a record 92. Haiti, Honduras, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mozambique, Senegal and Syria are first-time entrants. These films are vying for the initial shortlist of 9, and final five nominations to be announced on January 23. See the final list below.

Read More:Oscar Announces Changes for Foreign-Film Voting: Now Simpler! (Sort Of.)

The frontrunners include Sweden selected Ruben Östlund’s hilarious Palme d’Or-winner “The Square” (October 27, Magnolia Pictures), an art-world satire shot in majority Swedish with some English from stars Claes Bang, Elisabeth Moss, and Dominic West, thus giving Östlund another shot after “Force Majeure” was a surprise 2015 Oscar omission.

Germany’s choice, Fatih Akin’s “In the Fade” (December 27, Magnolia Pictures), won Best Actress for Diane Kruger at Cannes.
See full article at Indiewire »
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