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Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Partner Reflects on His Addiction Battle: ‘Every Day Was Filled With Worry’

Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Partner Reflects on His Addiction Battle: ‘Every Day Was Filled With Worry’
February 2, 2018 will mark four years since Philip Seymour Hoffman passed away, and his partner Mimi O’Donnell has opened up to Vogue in a new first-person account of the late actor’s devastating battle with heroin addiction during the final months of his life. O’Donnell knew Hoffman since 1999 and the two would go on to have three children together: Cooper, 14, Tallulah, 11 and Willa, 9.

“As soon as Phil started using heroin again, I sensed it, terrified,” O’Donnell writes. “I told him, ‘You’re going to die. That’s what happens with heroin.’ Every day was filled with worry. Every night, when he went out, I wondered: Will I see him again?”

According to O’Donnell, Hoffman’s addiction battle started with prescription pills before the actor turned to heroin. The two decided after Hoffman returned from a stint
See full article at Indiewire »

Culture Dump #20: 5 Actors who Really want to win an Oscar!

The 90th Academy Awards is just a few months away – and you can tell. The industry has stepped up its game by firing out its best and brightest titles in the hopes of bagging gold – but who’ll come out on top? While Oscar predictions can often be hit and miss, some stars wear their intentions very much on their sleeve when it comes to Academy approval. People like…

Joaquin Phoenix

When actors pick roles the old saying goes: one for them, one for you. Unless you’re Joaquin Phoenix. The Gladiator star seems to have dedicated his entire career to fully immersing himself in characters most likely to land him on the Best Actor shortlist. While he may have only been nominated thrice (Gladiator in 2001, Walk The Line in 2006 and The Master in 2013), you’d be forgiven for thinking it’s happened more, having starred in look-at-me awards fodder Her,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Lovesick: The Complicated Relationship of "Phantom Thread"

This essay discusses the end of Phantom Thread in depth and should be read after seeing the film to avoid spoilers.Reynolds Woodcock, an esteemed and sybaritic dressmaker, believes himself to be cursed, incapable of being loved the way he wants. He’s unwilling to alter his life to accommodate a partner, as his is an existence besotted by the rigor of routine, rules, and persnickety tics. The quietude he desires has a hermetic feeling; he says an air of quiet death suffuses his house, but doesn’t realize it's because his serenity is forced, unnatural. As portrayed by Daniel Day-Lewis, Reynolds is a fastidious man, one whose attire is never less than immaculate, whose choice and use of words is trenchant and unsparing. Reynolds’s assiduous attention to details, and his utter devotion to his craft, have brought him illustrious customers and a certain amount of influence. But such self-allegiance,
See full article at MUBI »

There Will Be Greenwood: The Radiohead Rocker on Scoring ‘Phantom Thread’

There Will Be Greenwood: The Radiohead Rocker on Scoring ‘Phantom Thread’
After their much-acclaimed collaboration on “There Will Be Blood,” as well as lesser-known projects “The Master” and “Inherent Vice,” director Paul Thomas Anderson and Radiohead’s multi-instrumentalist savant Jonny Greenwood have teamed up for the fourth consecutive time on “Phantom Thread.”

The film’s piano-and-strings dominated score, which received a Golden Globes nomination for best original score, plays a key role in defining the lead characters of Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis), the 1950s London couture designer, and Alma (Vicky Krieps), his model and lover. Anderson first called Greenwood about it a year ago.

“We talked a lot about ‘50s music, what was popularly heard then as well as what was being written and recorded,” Greenwood tells Variety. “Nelson Riddle and Glenn Gould’s Bach recordings were the main references. I was interested in the kind of jazz records that toyed with incorporating big string sections, Ben Webster made some good ones, and focus on
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Phantom Thread’: Here’s What Critics Are Saying About Daniel Day-Lewis’ Final Performance

Daniel Day-Lewis already has five Oscar nominations for Best Actor under his belt, and he seems destined to land a sixth for his work in Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread.” The actor stars as Reynolds Woodcock, a renowned London fashion designer in the 1950s, and the role has become highly publicized since it marks Day-Lewis’ final performance before retiring from the screen. Fortunately, it appears Day-Lewis is going out on a glorious high note.

Read More:‘Phantom Thread’ First Reactions Prove Paul Thomas Anderson Has Made One of the Best Films of 2017

In his A review of the drama, IndieWire’s Eric Kohn raves, “Anderson has crafted a memorable finale for his ‘There Will Be Blood’ collaborator in British dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock,” noting just how successfully Day-Lewis “rises to the challenge” of digging into his character’s “emotional immaturity.” Kohn is hardly alone in his praise for Day-Lewis.
See full article at Indiewire »

Movie Review – Phantom Thread (2017)

Phantom Thread, 2017.

Written and Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson.

Starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Vicky Krieps, Lesley Manville, Camilla Rutherford, and Brian Gleeson.

Synopsis:

Set in 1950’s London, Reynolds Woodcock is a renowned dressmaker whose fastidious life is disrupted by a young, strong-willed woman, Alma, who becomes his muse and lover.

Three-time Oscar winner Daniel Day-Lewis has delivered unforgettable method acting performances ranging from heartless oil drillers, paralyzed painter Christy Brown who only had control over his left foot, the greatest Us President of all-time Abraham Lincoln, and more, so it initially came across as a little anticlimactic when he announced that his role as renowned fictional dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock in Phantom Thread would mark the end of his acting career. It doesn’t exactly feel like an explosive role to go out on, but never doubt writer and director Paul Thomas Anderson (There Will Be Blood, The Master), especially when collaborating with the notorious milkshake drinker.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread” unravels a farewell to Daniel Day-Lewis

Another day, another embargo lifts for a high profile December release hoping to make an Oscar play. Today, it’s Phantom Thread, the second collaboration between filmmaker Paul Thomas Anderson and actor Daniel Day-Lewis. With Day-Lewis claiming that he’s retiring and that this is his final on screen appearance, the movie has an added bit of prestige to it. Anderson films always have that luster, but this classy outing doubles down on it. PTA and Ddl made something special together last time around with There Will Be Blood. Since then, Anderson has challenged audiences with The Master and Inherent Vice, while Day-Lewis won another Academy Award with Lincoln. Able to speak freely, I must admit to being a bit puzzled by this new work. Still, it will generate plenty of discussion. Plot wise, let me start here with what IMDb lists as the description: “Set in the glamour of 1950’s post-war London,
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

‘Phantom Thread’ Review: Paul Thomas Anderson Fashions a Continually Surprising Relationship Drama

On a basic level, Paul Thomas Anderson makes films about magnetic presences — figures who emanate such greatness that it’s nearly as impossible for bystanders to be around them as it is to not be around them. Phantom Thread, Anderson’s ninth film, is of a piece with much of his career in that way, telling of a prodigal 1950s dressmaker, Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis), who inspires equally rapturous reactions to his handiwork and his mercurial disposition.

Just as The Master unmasked a serious-man character study as a psychological survey of bullshit artists and Inherent Vice played dress-up as a noir story to spin a tale of immovable sadness, so too does Phantom Thread present itself as a rigorous biopic-like narrative while its interests are far less fussy or predicable. This is less an examination of a singular person than a look at the torturous and sublime experience of his
See full article at The Film Stage »

Film Review: ‘Phantom Thread’

Film Review: ‘Phantom Thread’
Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis), the svelte and smoldering middle-aged British fashion designer at the heart of Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread,” is a man who seems to have everything he wants. He lives in a splendid five-story London townhouse with walls the color of cream, and he works there too, starting early, sitting with his tea and pastries as he does the day’s sketches, already possessed by his reverent labor. He’s a dressmaker who works with the fervor of an artist — dreaming, obsessing, perfecting. At night he sips martinis at parties and restaurants, rubbing shoulders with the countesses and wealthy London ladies who are his clients, and he’s also a devoted serial womanizer who falls for — and discards — one comely model muse after another. (As the film opens, his current flame is flickering out.) “Phantom Thread” is set in 1955, but Reynolds, in his posh and pampered upper-crust way, has the air
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Phantom Thread’ Film Review: Paul Thomas Anderson and Daniel Day-Lewis Strike an Entrancing Pose

‘Phantom Thread’ Film Review: Paul Thomas Anderson and Daniel Day-Lewis Strike an Entrancing Pose
After mining the American soul (“Boogie Nights,” “There Will Be Blood,” “The Master”) as brilliantly as any working director has in the last 50 years, Paul Thomas Anderson moves to 1950’s England for “Phantom Thread,” his mesmerizing follow-up to the loosey-goosey “Inherent Vice.” An elegantly stitched romance of vector-crossing emotional neediness, it’s set in an evocative ecosphere of haute couture fashion. But by the time it reaches its appetizingly perverse end, the film primarily reaffirms Anderson’s own skill at hand-crafting exquisitely conflicting interior and external worlds. Advance word zeroed in on the movie’s status as three-time Academy Award-winner Daniel Day-Lewis’s swan.
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Phantom Thread’ Review: Paul Thomas Anderson’s Riveting ’50s Romance Is a Screwball Comedy In Disguise

‘Phantom Thread’ Review: Paul Thomas Anderson’s Riveting ’50s Romance Is a Screwball Comedy In Disguise
Paul Thomas Anderson’s filmmaking swings between ambitions — sweeping riffs on history (“Boogie Nights,” “There Will Be Blood,” “The Master”) and peculiar, enlightening character studies (“Hard Eight,” “Punch Drunk Love”). His ambling Thomas Pynchon adaptation “Inherent Vice” tried to merge those modalities, but “Phantom Thread” really pulls it off, with his most concise, endearing works in years, one that plumbs dark and mysterious Andersonian depths to unearth a surprising degree of warmth lurking within.

It also surprises with his strongest female lead in two decades of movies. Though some of the hype around “Phantom Thread” stems from Daniel Day-Lewis’ announcement of his retirement after this role, the world’s most revered Method Actor meets his match alongside stunning discovery Vicky Krieps. There’s no doubt that Anderson has crafted a memorable finale for his “There Will Be Blood” collaborator in British dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock, a stern perfectionist in his mid-
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Phantom Thread’ First Reactions Prove Paul Thomas Anderson Has Made One of the Best Films of 2017

Movie lovers anxiously awaiting the review embargo for Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread” to be lifted can breathe a sigh of relief, for the first reactions make it clear the director will be returning to the big screen in top form. The film reunites Anderson with “There Will Be Blood” star Daniel Day-Lewis in the story of a renowned 1950s dressmaker who falls for a strong-willed younger muse.

Read More:Daniel Day-Lewis Breaks Silence on Retiring From Acting: ‘I Have Great Sadness’

Film critics aren’t allowed to publish reviews until December 7, but they have been able to talk about “Phantom Thread” in other contexts. Numerous film critics have already named “Phantom Thread” one of the best films of 2017, including IndieWire’s own Eric Kohn and David Ehlrich. The film been appeared on Top 10 lists from Rolling Stone, The New York Times, Vulture, Vogue, and more. Here’s
See full article at Indiewire »

Recommended New Books on Filmmaking: ‘Blade Runner 2049,’ Francis Ford Coppola, David Bowie & More

It’s been a stellar year of cinema and pop culture-themed books, and the texts (and Blu-rays) in this round-up all make fine gifts. One additional book that should be on your year-end list is Mark Frost’s Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier. It’s a satisfying companion to season three of Peaks, not to mention Frost’s own Secret History of Twin Peaks. So be sure to check out Nick Newman’s recent interview with the Peaks co-creator.

Live Cinema and Its Techniques by Francis Ford Coppola (Liveright)

The legendary Francis Ford Coppola has spoken of “live cinema” with regularity over the years, specifically with respect to 1981’s One From the Heart. That film, a box office flop now held in some regard, is an essential part of Live Cinema and Its Techniques, a fascinating new book authored by Coppola himself. The lessons from that experience, Coppola says,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Live orchestration of Phantom Thread by Amber Wilkinson - 2017-12-04 11:13:42

Daniel Day-Lewis and Vicky Krieps in Phantom Thread Photo: Laurie Sparham/Focus Features The Royal Festival Hall is to host a preview of Paul Thomas Anderson’s new film Phantom Thread with first live orchestral performance of Jonny Greenwood’s score

The screening will take place on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 ahead of the film’s UK release in cinemas on Friday, February 2.

The screening will be accompanied by the first live orchestral performance of Jonny Greenwood’s soundtrack to the film, performed by London Contemporary Orchestra and conducted by Robert Ames.

Phantom Thread, which stars three-time Academy Award winner Daniel Day-Lewis in his final film appearance, will be introduced by Anderson and Greenwood. The award-winning American film director and Radiohead lead guitarist and composer will discuss their creative partnership and offer insight into scoring the film. The film follows on from a legacy of previous collaborations between Greenwood and Anderson including films There Will Be Blood,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

‘Phantom Thread’ Breakout Vicky Krieps Had No Idea She Auditioned for a Paul Thomas Anderson Film

‘Phantom Thread’ Breakout Vicky Krieps Had No Idea She Auditioned for a Paul Thomas Anderson Film
If you don’t know the name Vicky Krieps, then start getting ready to never forget it. The 34-year-old Luxembourgian actress gives one of the year’s breakthrough performances in Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread,” in which she stars opposite Daniel Day-Lewis and Lesley Manville. Krieps joined her director and co-stars after the film’s first New York City screening on November 26, where she revealed quite the shocking audition story.

Krieps was given a script by her manager which featured a short monologue written by Anderson, although the actress admits she didn’t read the email from her manager properly and so she missed the fact that she would be sending in an audition tape to the director of “Boogie Nights,” “The Master,” and “There Will Be Blood.” She spent four days procrastinating the audition before finally making a tape of herself and sending it in.

Anderson ended up
See full article at Indiewire »

Daniel Day-Lewis Struggled With Draping On the Set of Paul Thomas Anderson’s ‘Phantom Thread’

Daniel Day-Lewis Struggled With Draping On the Set of Paul Thomas Anderson’s ‘Phantom Thread’
Daniel Day-Lewis is known to go to extreme lengths when preparing for his roles, staying in character on set and getting inside their mindsets. That seems to be the case for his alleged final performance, in Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread,” in which the soon-to-retire actor plays fictionalized couturier Reynolds Woodcock. According to longtime costume designer Mark Bridges, the mid-fifties period piece found Lewis learning how to drape in preparation for his performance — just not exactly the way he should have.

Read More:‘Phantom Thread’: Enter to Attend Special Screening with Paul Thomas Anderson and Daniel Day-Lewis

The movie, a dark romantic drama that co-stars Lesley Manville as Reynolds’ sister and Vicky Krieps as the dressmaker’s lover, has yet to screen widely. However, Bridges revealed some details about the production process in an interview with IndieWire at the Key West Film Festival, where he received the Golden
See full article at Indiewire »

Sneak Preview Trailer for Paul Thomas Anderson's 'Phantom Thread'

"Reynolds has made my dream come true..." Hold on! The year isn't over yet! There's still a few contenders waiting to premiere. Focus Features has debuted a new "sneak preview" trailer Paul Thomas Anderson's latest film, Phantom Thread, featuring details on sneak preview screenings happening in New York and L.A. Don't forget, PTA ran this kind of preview for The Master a few years ago as well. This is supposedly the final film for acclaimed actor Daniel Day-Lewis, who is retiring from acting (for now). Set in the 1950s in London, the sensual story is about renowned dressmaker named Reynolds Woodcock, as played by Day-Lewis, whose "carefully tailored life" is disrupted by love - as you can watch in this new trailer. The cast includes Lesley Manville, Vicky Krieps, Camilla Rutherford, and Jane Perry. The movie "paints an illuminating portrait both of an artist on a creative journey,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

The Persistence of Vision: Paul Thomas Anderson’s Auterism

By Jacob Oller

Selfishness in direction, but in the best possible way. irector Paul Thomas Anderson is one of the most predominant examples of a modern auteur working today. His films, including Inherent Vice, The Master, There Will Be Blood, and Boogie Nights, are all inextricably his. Figuring out how to put his imagination on screen is the […]

The article The Persistence of Vision: Paul Thomas Anderson’s Auterism appeared first on Film School Rejects.
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Amy Adams Talks ‘Justice League,’ American Cinematheque Award

Amy Adams Talks ‘Justice League,’ American Cinematheque Award
Amy Adams can rise to any challenge: sparkle as a princess, brawl like a Boston barmaid, dance with Muppets, kiss Superman, earn five Oscar nominations and hold her own against Meryl Streep — twice. Still, on Nov. 10, the deeply private, craft-driven actress will face a new test when Tom Hanks, Jake Gyllenhaal, Natalie Portman, Kristen Stewart, Chris Messina and Denis Villeneuve take the stage of the Beverly Hilton Hotel to praise her talents as the 31st recipient of the American Cinematheque Award.

Being lauded for her entire body of work is “a little overwhelming,” says Adams. “I tend to look at things piece by piece.”

As for the prospect of watching a montage of her entire filmography, Adams falls silent. “Yup,” she eventually says with the well-mannered equanimity of an actress who spent years doing dinner theater in Minnesota. Then she giggle-exhales.

“I wasn’t even comfortable at my wedding having my family say things that were nice
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Christopher Nolan Gets Candid on the State of Movies, Rise of TV and Spielberg’s Influence

Christopher Nolan Gets Candid on the State of Movies, Rise of TV and Spielberg’s Influence
There have been extensive doom-and-gloom scenarios about the demise of movies lately, but writer-director Christopher Nolan isn’t among those sounding the death knell. Last summer, as the box office and attendance careened toward their lowest levels in decades, Nolan put his artistry where his optimism was — delivering a jolt of pure cinema with “Dunkirk.”

The picture thrusts viewers into one of the turning points of World War II, recounting a moment when British forces faced total annihilation at the hands of the Nazis. Shot with Imax cameras and presented in 70mm, it also serves as a potent reminder that some things are best delivered on the widest screens possible. “Dunkirk” not only garnered massive critical acclaim, but audiences around the globe flocked to see the film, which grossed $524 million worldwide.

“At a time when there’s all kinds of storytelling around, movies that gravitate toward things that only movies can do carve out a place for themselves
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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