Columbo (1971) - News Poster

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‘Columbo’ Architects Sue Universal Over Unpaid Profits From Detective Drama

Remember when episodes of Columbo would start with a cleverly planned and, er, executed killing in which the perp took great pains in trying to throw the cops off his trail? Well, the creators of that iconic NBC crime drama starring Peter Falk are suing Universal over what they claim is not deliberate elusiveness but merely choosing not to pay them what was owed. In a 15-page complaint filed today in Los Angeles Superior Court through their loanout companies (read it <a href="https://pmcdeadline2.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/columbo-complaint-wm.pdf" target="_blank"…
See full article at Deadline TV »

'Columbo' Creators Sue Universal Over Profits from 1970s Show

Columbo may no longer be on network television, but there's another case to solve, thanks to a lawsuit filed Tuesday against Universal City Studios.

Suing through loan-out companies, Columbo producers William Link and the heirs of Richard Levinson (who died in 1987) allege being shortchanged on profits from the detective series that starred Peter Falk and aired on NBC in the 1970s.

"The television studios are notoriously greedy," states a complaint lodged in Los Angeles Superior Court. "This case involves outright and obviously intentional dishonesty perpetrated against two iconic talents. Here, Universal decided it just wasn't going to account to Plaintiffs...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Canon Of Film: ‘Murder on the Orient Express’ (1974)

In this week’s edition of Canon Of Film, we take a look Sidney Lumet‘s hypnotic ‘Murder on the Orient Express‘ just in time for the release of Kenneth Branagh‘s remake of the same name. For the story behind the genesis of the Canon, you can click here.

Murder On The Orient Express (1974)

Director: Sidney Lumet

Screenplay: Paul Dehn based on the novel by Agatha Christie (uncredited)

Strangely, the detective story is actually a fairly newer genre when compared to others, in terms of literary history, it is, and the inventor of the genre is not who you’d think it’d be either, it was Edgar Allen Poe, with his trilogy of C. Auguste Dupin stories, ‘The Murder of the Rue Morgue‘, ‘The Mystery of Marie Roget,’ and my favorite, ‘The Purloined Letter‘ back in the 1840s. I’m not sure why this genre didn’t pick up until then,
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

10 Things We Learned From HBO's 'Spielberg' Documentary

10 Things We Learned From HBO's 'Spielberg' Documentary
Susan Lacy's documentary Spielberg debuts October 7th on HBO, trots out an all-star team of interviewees – from film critics to famous friends, the Toms (Cruise and Hanks) to God herself, a.k.a. Oprah Winfrey. The voices film buffs will undoubtedly want to hear from the most, however, belong to his fellow "movie brats": Francis Ford Coppola, Brian De Palma, George Lucas and Martin Scorsese, who all talk at length about their heady New Hollywood days alongside Spielberg in the early Seventies. All of them partied together, bounced
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Pyx (1973)

  • DailyDead
Redemption can be a hard ticket to punch, in real life let alone on film. An arc has to be convincing in a short space of time and make us believe our protagonist’s journey. Thanks to a brilliant performance by Karen Black and a meticulously unfurled plot, The Pyx (1973) offers sorrow and resolution in a gripping package.

Released in September by Cinepix Film Properties in our home and native land, Canada, and by Cinerama Releasing Corporation in the States the following month, The Pyx used Canadian shelter funds not to tell an exploitive tale, but rather a somber character study dressed up as a neo-noir with an occult twist. Not an easy sell to be sure, but does it really matter? At the end of the day, The Pyx is another noble attempt to infuse the genre with unusual strands regardless of the box office receipts. (I mean, my
See full article at DailyDead »

Venice Film Review: ‘The Private Life of a Modern Woman’

Venice Film Review: ‘The Private Life of a Modern Woman’
It’s a moment we’ve witnessed in the movies a thousand times. Two people are fighting, one of them holding a gun, and when the other one tries to wrest it from him, they tussle a bit and the gun just…goes off. Boom! Like that. It’s an “accident” that has the cosmic convenience of killing somebody who deserved to die. (It’s homicide committed by happenstance.) “The Private Life of a Modern Woman,” James Toback’s loose-limbed existential meta-thriller, is built around just such an incident. Vera, a famous New York actress played with tremulous distraught layers by Sienna Miller, has let a reckless-punk petty-criminal ex-boyfriend (Nick Matthews) into her apartment. He attacks her, and the two draw close, his gun right there in between them. And then — boom! — he’s dead.

According to the logic of movies (or even life), Vera has nothing to feel guilty about; she was acting in pure, urgent
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Martin Landau, Mission: Impossible and Ed Wood Star, Dead at 89

Martin Landau, Mission: Impossible and Ed Wood Star, Dead at 89
Oscar winner Martin Landau died Saturday of “unexpected complications” following a brief stay at UCLA Medical Center, per The Hollywood Reporter. He was 89.

Landau got his big break when he was cast in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 film North by Northwest. In 1966, he began his star-making role as master of disguise Rollin Hand in the small screen Mission: Impossible, for which he earned the Golden Globe award as well as several Emmy nominations. In the series, Landau starred alongside then-wife Barbara Bain. It would mark the first of two small-screen collaborations for the couple, who later co-starred in the 1970s science-fiction program Space: 1999.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Bob Odenkirk Recalls His First Emmy Win

Bob Odenkirk Recalls His First Emmy Win
These days Bob Odenkirk is best known for his Emmy nominated work as the star of the acclaimed “Breaking Bad” prequel “Better Call Saul.” But Odenkirk’s first brush with Emmy came thanks to his career in comedy writing. In his second season on staff at “Saturday Night Live,” Odenkirk was part of a crew including Conan O’Brien, Mike Myers and Al Franken who went home with Emmy gold.

What do you remember about your first Emmy experience?

We were all so young. I rented a tuxedo because I didn’t own one. I didn’t see why I would ever need to own a tuxedo in my life. Now I have four. I don’t think I need four, but whatever I have them. It was comical to all of us. It was a weird mix of an honor, and a joke. We just felt like such interlopers in the actual business. We
See full article at Variety - TV News »

When good TV goes bad: the moment Columbo’s case went cold

It wasn’t the 10-year break in the 80s that did for the crumpled detective, but rather a truly berserk episode from season five

The Columbo character-type is so familiar – paving the way for gun-shy, cerebral TV tecs such as Morse or Fitz from Cracker – that it’s easy to forget how revolutionary it was when the series became a global smash in the early 1970s. Here was a murder mystery where the key eyewitness was the audience, made complicit by watching the killer execute their foul deed at the top of each episode. The headline star, embodied by Peter Falk, would only amble in after an ad break or two. To look at his clapped-out Peugeot, you might suspect this shambling lieutenant would be late for his own funeral.

Yet underneath the slovenly suit was fierce cunning. Columbo would identify the culprit seemingly through intuition alone, then patiently chip
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Don Gordon, Actor in ‘Bullitt’ and ‘Papillon,’ Dies at 90

Don Gordon, Actor in ‘Bullitt’ and ‘Papillon,’ Dies at 90
Character actor Don Gordon, who appeared alongside his friend Steve McQueen in “Bullitt,” “Papillon,” and “The Towering Inferno,” died April 24 in Los Angeles, according to his wife.

Gordon, who often played tough cops and gangsters, was Emmy-nominated for “The Defenders” in 1962. His first major television role came in “The Blue Angels,” which ran in 1960-61.

In “Bullitt,” he played Delgetti, the partner of McQueen’s detective character. In “Papillon,” he was the inmate Julot; he was a fire captain in “The Towering Inferno.”

His early TV roles included roles in McQueen’s 1959 “Wanted: Dead or Alive,” “Peyton Place,” “Border Patrol,” “U.S. Marshal,” and “Twilight Zone” episodes “The Four of Us Are Dying” and “The Self-Improvement of Salvadore Ross.” His other 1960s TV appearances included “The Lloyd Bridges Show,” “Channing,” “Empire,” “The Fugitive,” and “The Outer Limits.”

In the 1970s, he appeared in “Columbo” and starred in the TV series “Lucan” in 1977-78. His film appearances included Dennis Hopper
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Don Gordon, Actor in ‘Bullitt’ and ‘Papillon,’ Dies at 90

Don Gordon, Actor in ‘Bullitt’ and ‘Papillon,’ Dies at 90
Character actor Don Gordon, who appeared alongside his friend Steve McQueen in “Bullitt,” “Papillon,” and “The Towering Inferno,” died April 24 in Los Angeles, according to his wife.

Gordon, who often played tough cops and gangsters, was Emmy-nominated for “The Defenders” in 1962. His first major television role came in “The Blue Angels,” which ran in 1960-61.

In “Bullitt,” he played Delgetti, the partner of McQueen’s detective character. In “Papillon,” he was the inmate Julot; he was a fire captain in “The Towering Inferno.”

His early TV roles included roles in McQueen’s 1959 “Wanted: Dead or Alive,” “Peyton Place,” “Border Patrol,” “U.S. Marshal,” and “Twilight Zone” episodes “The Four of Us Are Dying” and “The Self-Improvement of Salvadore Ross.” His other 1960s TV appearances included “The Lloyd Bridges Show,” “Channing,” “Empire,” “The Fugitive,” and “The Outer Limits.”

In the 1970s, he appeared in “Columbo” and starred in the TV series “Lucan
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Feature: HollywoodChicago.com Remembers Jonathan Demme

Chicago – The impact that director Jonathan Demme had on the last couple generations of cinema will live beyond his passing last week, at the age of 73. The Oscar-winning filmmaker also made an impact with the film writers of HollywoodChicago.com – Jon Espino, Patrick McDonald and Spike Walters.

Director Jonathan Demme on the Set of ‘The Silence of the Lambs

Photo credit: 20 Century Fox Home Entertainment

The director was described as “the last of the great humanists” in the HollywoodChicago.com obituary, and followed through on that description with an incredible run of films in the 1980s and ‘90s, which included “Melvin and Howard” (1980), “Something Wild” (1986), “Swimming to Cambodia” (1987), “Married to the Mob” (1988), “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991) and “Philadelphia” (1993). He also created one of the greatest rock documentaries ever, “Stop Making Sense” (1984, featuring the Talking Heads) and worked extensively with Bruce Springsteen and Neil Young on other rock docs. He
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Film News: Oscar-Winning Director Jonathan Demme Dies at 73

New York City – He was the helmsman of “The Silence of the Lambs,” which won him Best Director and took home Best Picture at the 1992 Academy Awards, and made numerous other late 20th Century movie classics. Director Jonathan Demme died in New York City on April 26, 2017, at the age of 73.

Film writer Dave Kehr called Demme “the last of the great humanists,” and the director followed through on that description with an incredible run of films in the 1980s and ‘90s, which included “Melvin and Howard” (1980), “Something Wild” (1986), “Swimming to Cambodia” (1987), “Married to the Mob” (1988), “Lambs” (1991) and “Philadelphia” (1993). He also created one of the greatest rock documentaries ever, “Stop Making Sense” (1984, featuring the Talking Heads) and worked extensively with Bruce Springsteen and Neil Young on other rock docs. He even directed an episode of the TV classic “Columbo” in 1978, among his other TV achievements.

Director Jonathan Demme on the Set
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

'Fargo': FX's Coen-verse Crime Thriller Doubles Down on Cracked Genius

'Fargo': FX's Coen-verse Crime Thriller Doubles Down on Cracked Genius
Early on in the excellent new Fargo season, a down-and-out Minnesota chump makes a clumsy yet furious demand: "Are you gonna do what's right here, or are you gonna do what's right?" Bold prediction: Nobody here is going anywhere near what's right. The hotly awaited third chapter of Noah Hawley's groundbreaking FX anthology crime thriller is another snow noir in the Midwestern wastelands, full of cripplingly polite crooks just one you-betcha away from getting clubbed over the head. Everybody smells easy money – which means everybody is a target.

From
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Lola Albright, the Smokey-Voiced Star of Peter Gunn and Kirk Douglas’ Champion, Dies at 92

Lola Albright, the Smokey-Voiced Star of Peter Gunn and Kirk Douglas’ Champion, Dies at 92
Sultry singer and actress Lola Albright, who starred in TV’s Peter Gunn and in Kirk Douglas’s classic film Champion, has died at 92.

Albright died Thursday in Toluca Lake, California, her friend, Eric Anderson, confirmed to Ohio’s Akron Beacon Journal.

“She went very peacefully,” friend Eric Anderson said. “She died at 7:20 a.m. of natural causes. We loved her so much.”

Albright’s breakout role came as Douglas’s spurned lover in the boxing classic Champion, which earned Douglas an Oscar nomination.

She’s perhaps best remembered for playing the smokey-voiced nightclub singer Edie Hart opposite Craig Stevens
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘Peter Gunn’ Star Lola Albright Dies at 92

‘Peter Gunn’ Star Lola Albright Dies at 92
Lola Albright, the glamorous blonde actress best known for starring on the television series “Peter Gunn,” died Thursday at her home in Los Angeles. She was 92.

A native of Akron, Ohio, news of her death was first reported by the Akron Beacon-Journal. “She went very peacefully,” her friend Eric Anderson told the newspaper. “She died at 7:20 a.m. of natural causes. We loved her so much.”

Albright was a receptionist at Wakr radio in Akron, then left to go to Cleveland’s Wtam, where she wed announcer Warren Dean — the first of three marriages.

Her first film appearance came in 1947 in “The Unfinished Dance,” starring Margaret O’Brien. She then starred with Judy Garland in “Easter Parade” in 1948. The next year she appeared opposite Kirk Douglas in 1949’s “Champion,” portraying a spurned lover. Douglas received an Oscar nomination for his work.

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In 1950, she acted
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Best Murder Mystery Series Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Murder Mystery Series Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What is your favorite murder mystery show?

Erik Adams (@ErikMAdams), A.V. Club

It has to be “Twin Peaks,” right? I’m one of those annoying people who insists the show is so much more than “Who killed Laura Palmer?”, but that is our entry point to David Lynch and Mark Frost’s weird little world, and the question that briefly made “Twin Peaks” a pop-culture phenomenon. And the chapters of the series that deal with finding Laura’s murderer are some of the most compelling, from the dream-sequence enhanced “Zen, Or The Skill To Catch A Killer” or the eventual solution to the mystery, a
See full article at Indiewire »

The Best Murder Mystery Series Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Murder Mystery Series Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What is your favorite murder mystery show?

Erik Adams (@ErikMAdams), A.V. Club

It has to be “Twin Peaks,” right? I’m one of those annoying people who insists the show is so much more than “Who killed Laura Palmer?”, but that is our entry point to David Lynch and Mark Frost’s weird little world, and the question that briefly made “Twin Peaks” a pop-culture phenomenon. And the chapters of the series that deal with finding Laura’s murderer are some of the most compelling, from the dream-sequence enhanced “Zen, Or The Skill To Catch A Killer” or the eventual solution to the mystery, a
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Stanley Kallis, TV Producer of ‘Hawaii Five-o,’ ‘Mission: Impossible,’ Dies at 88

Stanley Kallis, TV Producer of ‘Hawaii Five-o,’ ‘Mission: Impossible,’ Dies at 88
Television producer and writer Stanley Kallis, who worked on shows including “Hawaii Five-o” and “Mission: Impossible,” died at his home in Laguna Beach, Calif. on Jan. 28.

He helped develop the concept for “Hawaii 5-0” for CBS with writer Leonard Freeman, then moved to producing “Mission: Impossible” with Peter Graves and Martin Landau before returning to “Hawaii 5-0” as executive producer.

His next show as producer was “Police Story,” created by Joseph Wambaugh, which won the Emmy for drama series in 1976. In the late 70s, Kallis produced “Washington Behind Closed Doors,” a mini-series for ABC that won seven Emmy nominations.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Bernard Fox, ‘Bewitched’s Dr. Bombay, Dies At 89

  • Uinterview
Bernard Fox, known to TV fans as Dr. Bombay on Bewitched and Col. Crittendon on Hogan’s Heros, has died or heart failure at 89. Bernard Fox Dies At 89 Fox appeared on a number of film and television shows, inducing The Mummy, Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo, The Dick Van Dyke Show, McHale’s Navy and Columbo. He also played Col. Archibald Gracie in […]

Source: uInterview

The post Bernard Fox, ‘Bewitched’s Dr. Bombay, Dies At 89 appeared first on uInterview.
See full article at Uinterview »
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