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Ithaca Fantastik 2017 Review: Let The Corpses Tan Forgoes Narrative in Favor of Bizarre, Exquisite Style

  • DailyDead
Homage has dominated (some may argue, plagued) the horror market in recent years, from the retro ’80s to the luxurious ’60s, we’ve seen several eras recreated on screen to varying degrees of success. Rather than simply imitate, some filmmakers have inverted, distorted, and modernized these beloved styles into something entirely new. Giallo masters Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani provide the perfect example. This year, the duo returns for their third full-length feature, this time focusing their talents on a sun-baked heist thriller. While its story is rather incomprehensible (even for admirers of their previous work), the force of their filmmaking remains astoundingly immersive.

Three criminals steal a massive amount of gold and hide out at an old castle with the sinister Madame Luce. A woman, having kidnapped her son during a nasty divorce, escapes to the castle as well. Cops poke around their sanctuary, kicking off a deadly shootout between them,
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Review Round-Up: Revenge, My Friend Dahmer, and Let The Corpses Tan

  • DailyDead
The last few weeks have felt like an endless marathon for this writer, trying to keep up with a myriad of cinematic delights, including this latest batch of films I saw while at the 2017 Fantastic Fest last month. Read on for my thoughts on this trio of amazing indie movies, including first-time feature filmmaker Coralie Fargeat’s Revenge, My Friend Dahmer from Marc Meyer, and Let the Corpses Tan by Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani.

Revenge: It’s no secret that the decision to attend Fantastic Fest this year came with some controversy attached to it, especially in regards to the issues of sexual assault and the way women can be, and have been, treated by society. And for Fargeat, she embraced this controversy with her bold decision to still screen her film Revenge in Austin, and I have to say, I am So glad she did. In what
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Crypt of Curiosities: The Short Films of Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani

  • DailyDead
For my money, Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani are two of the best genre directors working today. Their two feature-length gialli, Amer (2009) and The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears (2014) are among the greatest "throwback" films of all-time, taking the vocabulary and iconography of the giallo and twisting it into something new and exciting, all while playing with the cinematic form with a barrage of close-ups, split screens, and Chris Marker-esque jump-cut slideshows. The only downside is that, as of the time of this writing, only the aforementioned gialli are available for viewing, while their latest film, Let the Corpses Tan, won’t be released stateside until this summer. So what’s a fan of hyper-stylized neo-gialli to do? Why, turn to their shorts, of course!

Like many filmmakers, Cattet and Forzani honed the aesthetic they’d use in their later films through their early shorts. Unlike all filmmakers,
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Lff 2017: ‘Let the Corpses Tan’ Review

Review by Matthew Turner

Stars: Elina Lowensohn, Stephane Ferrara, Bernie Bonvoisin, Herve Sogne, Michelangelo Marchese, Marc Barbe, Pierre Nisse, Marine Sainsily, Dorilya Calmel, Aline Stevens, Dominique Troyes, Bamba | Written and Directed by Helene Cattet, Bruno Forzani

Belgian co-directors Helene Cattet and Bruno Forzani garnered an instant cult following with Amer (2009) and The Strange Colour of Your Body’s Tears (2013), both of which paid luxurious homage to 1970s giallo movies. Their latest film, Let the Corpses Tan (or Laissez Bronzer les Cadavres, original language fans) sees the pair applying their expert pastiche skills to violent European crime thrillers of the same decade, to deliriously enjoyable effect.

Loosely adapted from a 1971 French novel by Jean-Patrick Machete and Jean-Pierre Bastid, the plot is deceptively simple and a good deal more coherent than either of Cattet and Forzani’s previous films. Former Hal Hartley muse Elina Lowensohn plays Luce, a middle-aged artist who lives in a run-down,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Halloween 2017: Girls Just Want to Have Blood: 16 Horror Projects Directed by Women to Stream on Shudder

  • DailyDead
February is known as Women in Horror Month, when the spotlight is put on female filmmakers working inside our favorite genre, and many horror sites run pieces about movies directed by women. And that’s great! But there’s no reason why that spotlight should be limited to only one month, particularly when there are so many brilliant and talented female filmmakers working in the genre. Why not use this October to hit up these titles on Shudder and get to know some of the most exciting female voices in horror right now?

Prevenge (2016, dir. Alice Lowe) Alice Lowe writes, directs, and stars in this darkly comic, twisted fantasy about a woman who is very, very pregnant (Lowe herself was pregnant during shooting) and goes on a killing spree when her unborn baby talks to her and tells her to take revenge for a past tragedy. The film never fully transcends its gimmick,
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Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani’s “Let the Corpses Tan” Acquired by Kino Lorber

“Let the Corpses Tan”

“Let the Corpses Tan” has found a home weeks after screening at the Toronto International Film Festival. Variety reports that Kino Lorber snagged North American rights to the neo-Western, directed by Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani.

The French-language film follows a “gang of robbers who are looking to lay low after an armored-car robbery,” the source writes. They “find a seemingly perfect hideout at a secluded residence where a worn-out writer and his muse are living.”

Shooting the film in a remote area presented unique challenges to Cattet and Forzani. “Since the set wasn’t accessible by trucks or cars, but just by helicopter (and no electricity, water…nothing but rocks!), we had to get creative to make this adventure possible,” they’ve explained. “So the main focus of our preparation was based on this challenge — we had to think about every single detail in advance because once the shooting would begin we would be trapped and couldn’t improvise or add more material!”

Elina Löwensohn (“A Very Long Engagement”), Stéphane Ferrara (“Alexander”), and Hervé Sogne (“The Assistant”) star.

Cattet and Forzani previously collaborated on “Amer” and “The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears.”

“Let the Corpses Tan” made its world premiere at Locarno and has been receiving strong reviews on the festival circuit.

Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani have made a stunning film that’s both a thrilling ride and a beautifully crafted homage to the spaghetti western and classic Italian giallo,” said Kino Lorber CEO Richard Lorber. ”It defines our company’s mantra: experience cinema. We can’t wait to take this release trip with such boldly brilliant filmmakers.”

A theatrical release is planned for next summer.

Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani’s “Let the Corpses Tan” Acquired by Kino Lorber was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Kino Lorber Acquires North American Rights to ‘Let The Corpses Tan’ (Exclusive)

Kino Lorber Acquires North American Rights to ‘Let The Corpses Tan’ (Exclusive)
Kino Lorber has acquired North American rights to Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani’s “Let The Corpses Tan” which had a critically acclaimed unspooling at Toronto’s Midnight Madness section and Austin’s Fantastic Fest.

The stylish neo-Western film centers on a gang of robbers who are looking to lay low after an armored-car robbery and find a seemingly perfect hideout at a secluded residence where a worn-out writer and his muse are living.

Produced by Anonymes Films, Need Productions, Tobina Film, “Let The Corpses Tan” stars Romanian-American actress Elina Löwensohn (“A Very Long Engagement”), Stéphane Ferrara (“Alexander”) and Hervé Sogne (“SK1”).

“Let The Corpses Tan” marks the Brussels-based writer-directors’s anticipated follow up to “Amer” and “The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears,” a pair of lauded pics that payed homage to Italian giallo horror films of the 1970s. “Let The Corpses Tan” world premiered at Locarno and had its U.S.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Fantastic Fest 2017 Review: Let The Corpses Tan, More Stylish Than Substantial

Writing-directing team Hélèn Cattet and Bruno Forzani burst onto the genre film scene in 2009 with the highly original Amer, a giallo-inspired experimental horror/thriller about different ages of one girl's life. Their second feature, The Strange Color of Your Body's Tears, went even further into mystery and strangeness in a more obscure story. Their third feature, Let the Corpses Tan, is something of an experiment for Cattet and Forzani, in that it comes from an original novel by Jean-Patrick Manchette. The result of the pair's high style with a complicated story, while (as always) beautiful to see and hear, is not entirely successful. On the gorgeous Italian coast, a criminal trio headed by Rhino has staged a dramatic robbery of an armed vehicle, killing four...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
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‘Let The Corpses Tan’: Bold, Surreal, Bombastic Blast From ‘Strange Color Of Your Body’s Tears’ Team [Tiff Review]

  • The Playlist
While some filmmakers are branded as putting style above substance, for directing duo Helene Cattet and Bruno Forzani (“Amer,” “The Strange Color Of Your Body’s Tears”) style is the substance. Strain as hard you might, you won’t find any subversive subtext or deep thematic texture in “Let The Corpses Tan,” and anything resembling poetry doesn’t go much further than the title.

Continue reading ‘Let The Corpses Tan’: Bold, Surreal, Bombastic Blast From ‘Strange Color Of Your Body’s Tears’ Team [Tiff Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Toronto Film Review: ‘Let the Corpses Tan’

The latest slavish homage to vintage exploitation genre tropes by Belgian duo Helene Cattet and Bruno Forzani, “Let the Corpses Tan” slightly expands one of the most rarefied bodies of work in recent cinema. This time the object of homage is (primarily) violent European crime thrillers of the 1970s, as opposed to the same era’s giallos, to which the co-directors’ “Amer” and “The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears” paid tribute. The shift in genre creates a comparatively more coherent narrative, with fidelity to the near-senseless horror plots no longer a requirement.

Otherwise this is a fetishistically precise recreation of a dead retro style, with no substance on the menu beyond the second-hand or accidental. Like a house made entirely of popsicle sticks, Cattet and Forzani’s movies are remarkable feats of dedication and detail, yet the nagging questions “What’s the function? What’s the point?” will continue to divide viewers. Commercial
See full article at Variety - Film News »

[Interview] ‘Let the Corpses Tan’ Directors Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani

Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani, the duo behind the stunning Giallo inspired Amer as well as The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears, will throw glitter and gold all over the Toronto International Film Festival with their Let the Corpses Tan (Laissez bronzer les cadavres!), which premieres tonight at the ongoing event. Adapted from Jean-Patrick Manchette and Jean-Pierre Bastid’s 1971 crime thriller, Let […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

New Tiff Trailers for ‘Let the Corpses Tan,’ ‘Custody,’ ‘Sweet Country,’ and More

It’s been a weekend full of reviews from the Toronto International Film Festival, and along with the premieres, it means producers or (if the film is lucky enough) distributors releasing the first look at footage in an attempt to drum up interest and stand out of the pack of hundreds of others at the festival. Well, it seems to have done the trick as we’re posting a round-up today.

First up, we have the first trailer for Let the Corpses Tan, the latest film from Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani, the duo behind Amer and The Strange Colour of Your Body’s Tears. We reviewed it here, and the preview displays some of the visual inventiveness at play. Along with that, there are previews for three other anticipated projects, including the Netflix documentary One of Us, arriving on the platform on October, as well as a pair of
See full article at The Film Stage »

Tiff Review: ‘Let the Corpses Tan’ Displays Impressive Formalism, Without Much to Say

The filmmaking duo Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani have gone about in some kind of relative obscurity since their first feature Amer in 2009. While that striking debut perhaps should’ve garnered them more attention, as well as the subsequent The Strange Colour of Your Body’s Tears, it feels safe to say they’re not out to get that crossover hit. If anything, they seem content kind of just doing the same thing over and over again.

To those not in the know, their whole deal is doing riffs on genre that cut out virtually all the connective tissue, leaving simply a procession of visual tropes. In the case of Let the Corpses Tan, there’s closeups on squinted eyes and gun barrels, aggressive whip pans and overbearing Morricone-esque music cues. Some will say they’re filmmakers made for those who find most Italian exploitation movies boring for the
See full article at The Film Stage »

Blasted By the Bullets: Hélène Cattet & Bruno Forzani Discuss "Let the Corpses Tan"

  • MUBI
Having plunged as deep as their knives could go into the long-dead corpse of the giallo genre in Amer and The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears, Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani now forge a kind of hybrid of the spaghetti Westerns and Italian crime films of the late ’60s, stripping out nearly all story and keeping the sublime transfixion on material iconography and brute behaviour. Adapted from Jean-Patrick Manchette’s lean debut novel from 1971 (co-written by Jean-Pierre Bastid, who, like Manchette, was also immersed in genre cinema), Let the Corpses Tan opens with target practice shooting up neo-expressionist paintings, introducing the two groups (artists and gangsters) hiding atop a Corsican redoubt. After a whip-fast gold heist along the coast (executed by Cattet and Forzani with a fiercely staccato musical precision) attracts the local police, the mixed-class gang holes up in the sun-baked ruins to fight first against the law and,
See full article at MUBI »

David Freyne’s Zombie Thriller ‘The Cured’ With Ellen Page Sells Abroad (Exclusive)

The Cured,” David Freyne’s zombie thriller with Ellen Page and Sam Keeley, has secured several distribution deals ahead of its world premiere in the Toronto International Film Festival’s Special Presentation section Saturday.

Bac Films, which handles international sales on the film, has closed deals for Greece (Spentzos), Turkey (Filmdom), the Middle East (Falcon), Hong Kong (Bravos), Malaysia and Indonesia (Tanweer), Singapore (Shaw), Taiwan (Caichang), Thailand (Sahamongkol), Vietnam (Skyline) and Philippines (Silverline). Wme, CAA and Bac Films represent North American rights.

Freyne’s feature debut, “The Cured” takes place in a world that has just survived a zombie plague and revolves around Senan (Keeley), a cured zombie who is now facing discrimination, and his sister-in-law Abbie (Page), who is willing to give him a second chance. Social issues arise due to widespread discrimination against once-infected zombies, leading to militant government interference.

Bac FilmsGilles Sousa said the banner has kept most key territories open in order
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Let the Corpses Tan’ Trailer Sparkles with a Glitters and Gold Shootout

Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani, the duo behind the stunning Giallo inspired Amer as well as The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears, have thrown glitter and gold all over their new trailer for Let the Corpses Tan (Laissez bronzer les cadavres!), which looks like it contains an epic and bloody shootout. Adapted from Jean-Patrick Manchette and […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

Let The Corpses Tan: Watch The Amazing Full Trailer For Amer Duo's Western!

Belgian filmmaking duo Bruno Forzani and Helene Cattet won a legion of dedicated fans around the world with their dazzling neo-giallo debut Amer several years back and they remain some of the most striking talents in European cinema today. While they've shifted styles slightly from project to project their signature style is always immediately recognizable, layered as it is with gorgeous retro-chic visuals. And the pair is back on the festival circuit now with their latest - a western titled Let The Corpses Tan (Laissez Bronzer Les Cadavres) - screening in Locarno and Toronto. Here's how Toronto describes it: Tiff Vanguard veterans Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani weaponize their aesthetic proclivities into an all-out bombardment of sensational style as they methodically adapt every devilish detail...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
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'Let the Corpses Tan' ('Laissez bronzer les cadavres'): Film Review | Locarno 2017

Stylish swagger goes full-tilt boogie in Let the Corpses Tan (Laissez bronzer les cadavres), the latest delirious exercise in lovingly retro pastiche from Brussels-based writer-directors Helene Cattet and Bruno Forzani. Having amassed a devoted cult following with luridly horror-flavored Amer (2009) and The Strange Color of Your Body's Tears (2013), the duo now adapt an influential 1971 French novel. The result is a spectacularly assaultive, borderline incoherent neo-Western that will recruit few new converts but is also guaranteed to leave no spectator indifferent. Bowing on Locarno's Piazza Grande, it's a must for festivals specializing in outre fare — midnight slots appeal —...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Poster for ‘Amer’ Directors’ ‘Let the Corpses Tan’ Goes Full Retro

Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani, the duo behind the stunning giallo inspired Amer as well as The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears, have shared their first art poster for Let the Corpses Tan (Laissez bronzer les cadavres!), courtesy of Bac Films, Anonymes Films and Tobina Film. Adapted from Jean-Patrick Manchette and Jean-Pierre Bastid’s 1971 crime thriller, Let […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

Let the Corpses Tan Receives Stunning Poster

Adapted from Jean-Patrick Manchette and Jean-Pierre Bastid’s 1971 crime thriller, Let the Corpses Tan (Laissez Bronzer Les Cadavres) is the third feature from filmmaking duo Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani, who previously brought us Amer and The Strange Color of… Continue Reading →

The post Let the Corpses Tan Receives Stunning Poster appeared first on Dread Central.
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