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2018 Oscars: ‘Blade Runner 2049’ would be the first cinematography champ to defeat a Best Picture-nominated film in 12 years

After wins this weekend at the American Society of Cinematographers and BAFTA, “Blade Runner 2049” appears to be well-positioned for the Oscars. Nothing is a sure thing with hard-luck 13-time loser Roger Deakins, but if he pulls this out, this would be the first time in 12 years that a non-Best Picture nominee beat a Best Picture nominee for Best Cinematography.

The last film to do this was “Memoirs of a Geisha” (2005), which edged out Best Picture nominees “Brokeback Mountain” and “Good Night, and Good Luck,” and non-Best Picture contenders “Batman Begins” and “The New World.” The following year’s Best Cinematography field was comprised entirely of non-Best Picture nominees — “Pan’s Labyrinth” beat “The Black Dahlia,” “Children of Men,” “The Illusionist” and “The Prestige” — so that is the last time a non-Best Picture nominee won the category. Since then, every cinematography champ has vied for the top award.

See 2018 BAFTA
See full article at Gold Derby »

Mpse Golden Reel winners: ‘Blade Runner 2049’ wins over Oscar frontrunner ‘Dunkirk’ in key category

All five of Oscar nominees for Best Sound Editing numbered among the contenders for the Golden Reel Awards bestowed by the Motion Picture Sound Editors on Sunday (Feb. 18). Oscar frontrunner “Dunkirk” lost the category equivalent — Sound Editing (Effects and Foley)– to “Blade Runner 2049.” The WWII epic did win for music over the sci-fi film.

Both films lost the dialogue & Adr race to “War for the Planet of the Apes,” which was snubbed by the sound branch of the academy. The other three Oscar nominees were shut out at the Golden Reel ceremony. “Baby Driver and “The Shape of Water” contended in those same three races while “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” was only nominated for its sound editing.

The 65th annual edition of these awards took place at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel in Los Angeles. Sound wiz John P. Fasal was feted for his lifetime of achievement and Kathryn Bigelow received the Filmmaker Award.
See full article at Gold Derby »

'Awe' review: Wonderfully bizarre, this film is a daring experiment

TollywoodComedy? Science fiction? Fantasy? Horror? 'Awe' is all of it and yet none of it. Sowmya RajendranPrashant Varma’s Awe is a difficult film to review. And if you plan to watch it, you should probably stop reading and come back after you’ve seen it. At a taut runtime of 1 hour 55 minutes, the film takes the viewer through a mind-boggling experience that’s fairly new for Indian cinema (I was reminded of the Malayalam film Carbon - but that's only because we have so few films which play mind games with the audience), let alone Tollywood. Yes, Hollywood films have already done it but I shall desist from naming them because that would work as a huge spoiler. The film opens with Kajal Aggarwal sitting in a restaurant and playing a “Do it-don’t do it” game by plucking the petals of a rose. The answer she ends up with is “Do it”. The narrative then swiftly moves to another scenario. A young woman (Eesha Rebba) is waiting to introduce her lover, Krish, to her parents. The set-up is conventional. The parents ask the usual nosy questions. There’s some cheeky humour woven in. You sit back thinking this is going to be an enjoyable comedy and then... boom! Prashant Varma bowls a bouncer. At this point, I was hoping the director wouldn’t turn this into a stale sex comedy. The presence of an intelligent actor like Nithya Menen assured me that he wouldn’t. And I wasn’t disappointed. From this segment, the film jumps to another bizarre one and then another and then another and then... you get the idea. In the process, ideas of time, space, gender and even sexual orientation are questioned, beautifully so. Devadarshini, who usually does the “homely” or comic sister roles, appears as a badass weirdo on a wheelchair. Priyadarshi Pullikonda, who has become a stock "funny friend" fixture, gets his own storyline. Regina Cassandra looks excitingly wicked with her numerous tattoos and piercings. Murali Sharma gets stuck with a crocodile in a toilet. Nani and Ravi Teja lend their voices for a fish and a tree respectively – and the fish and the tree make us laugh. No, I’m not high on anything! This is the film. Prashant Varma fools you into thinking we’re watching science fiction at one point (Matrix and Inception, for starters). Then we think we’re watching fantasy (the Murali Sharma part reminded me of Alice in Wonderland). Then suddenly it becomes a horror film (some cool CGI there). I was also wondering if this was some modern take on Hindu mythology, considering the names of the characters - Shiva, Parvathy, Radha, Krishna, Mira, Kali and so on. Awe is all of it and yet none of it. Yes, there’s a rational explanation for it all. Most of the film is set in closed spaces. Karthik Ghattamaneni has done some exceptional work with the cinematography. This is a film rich in visual cues and the camera constantly makes us question what we’re watching. The unpredictability is exciting, not just in the story but how it is told. This isn’t an anthology film and it’s not easy at all to give the viewer the impression of having met each of the numerous characters but Prashant pulls it off (quite like the rabbit pulling the man out of the hat visual he shows us at the beginning) with a great screenplay. The editing (Goutham Nerusu) is brilliant – the film follows a non-linear narrative and we jump from one chapter to another frequently. But it’s very smoothly done, you feel it’s all part of the same fabric (and it is). The background score (Mark K Robin) also helps to keep the film together – participating in creating the illusions on screen. Not every character works right when we’re watching them. The sequence between Srinivas Avasarala and Kaitlyn D’mello, for instance, is not as compelling as the rest. But it all comes together in the end and that’s what matters. If I had to quibble, I’d say it was unnecessary to have a character write in bold what the whole film was about in the end. Maybe the visuals for the opening credits could have been played again so the viewer could watch it with new eyes? The labelling in the end and the emphasis on the "message" seemed like an over-explanation but I guess it came from an anxiety to ensure that people got it and didn’t walk out of the theatre thinking Prashant Varma was completely bonkers. Awe might look inspired from Hollywood films in some parts but it’s very much its own film. Above all, this is one heck of a daring effort for a debut director – in the theatre I watched it in, the confused employees thought the screen was malfunctioning because of the black-outs in the latter half of the film and turned the lights on to figure out what the problem was. It only added to the loopy experience of watching Awe though. Disclaimer: This review was not paid for or commissioned by anyone associated with the film. Neither Tnm nor any of its reviewers have any sort of business relationship with the film's producers or any other members of its cast and crew.
See full article at The News Minute »

‘Dunkirk’ has an uphill Oscar battle: It’d be the first Best Picture winner without acting or writing nominations in 85 years

‘Dunkirk’ has an uphill Oscar battle: It’d be the first Best Picture winner without acting or writing nominations in 85 years
The story of this year’s Oscar race is rules. Which long-standing rule awards pundits rely on to make predictions will be broken? All of the top five Best Picture contenders in our predictions have something missing — “The Shape of Water” doesn’t have the SAG ensemble nomination, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” doesn’t have a director nomination, “Lady Bird” and “Get Out” don’t have editing or any craft nominations, and “Dunkirk”? “Dunkirk” would have to break one of the longest stats. Christopher Nolan’s epic doesn’t have any acting or writing nominations and only two films have won Best Picture without either of them: “Wings” (1927/28) and “Grand Hotel” (1932).

That’s right, it hasn’t happened in 85 years. Even then, you can attribute the first two instances to the early days of the Oscars, when categories, rules and voting patterns were in flux. “Wings,” of course, was
See full article at Gold Derby »

Playback: Christopher Nolan on ‘Dunkirk’ and the Director’s Role as Magician

Playback: Christopher Nolan on ‘Dunkirk’ and the Director’s Role as Magician
Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety podcast bringing you exclusive conversations with the talents behind many of today’s hottest films.

With eight Oscar nominations including best picture, Christopher Nolan’s World War II drama “Dunkirk” heads into the 90th annual Academy Awards as one of 2017’s most admired films. The filmmaker’s first-ever bid for directing, meanwhile, felt like a long time coming after he was previously passed over for films like “Memento,” “The Dark Knight” and “Inception.” That peer recognition is extra sweet for a craftsman who relishes the precision-tinkering of the trade, the nuts and bolts of which Nolan details in an exclusive 40-minute chat drilling down on approach and technique.

Listen to this week’s episode of “Playback” below. New episodes air every Thursday.

Click here for more episodes of “Playback.”

“There’s a sense of engineering about it that’s a lot of fun,” Nolan says about the job of a film director
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'My Days Of Mercy' with Ellen Page, Kate Mara to open BFI Flare festival

'My Days Of Mercy' with Ellen Page, Kate Mara to open BFI Flare festival
Postcards From London to close 32nd edition of London Lgbt Film Festival.

The 32nd edition of the BFI Flare: London Lgbt Film Festival has announced its opening and closing titles ahead of the event in March.

The festival will begin with Tali Shalom-Ezer’s My Days Of Mercy on Wednesday 21 March, and close with Steve McLean’s Postcards From London on Saturday 31 March.

From Princess director Shaolm-Ezer and starring Ellen Page (Juno, Inception, Freeheld) and Kate Mara (House Of Cards, The Martian), My Days Of Mercy is a love story between two women who differ in both their backgrounds and political perspectives.

The film is written by BAFTA nominated writer Joe Barton (The Ritual, iBoy), with Page and Mara producing alongside Christine Vachon and David Hinojosa. Great Point Media are handling international sales.

Postcards From London will have its European Premiere at the Festival; McClean’s first film since his 1994 Sundance hit Postcards From America is about Jim
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'My Days Of Mercy' with Ellen Page, Kate Mara to open BFI Flare

'My Days Of Mercy' with Ellen Page, Kate Mara to open BFI Flare
Postcards From London to close 32nd edition of London Lgbt Film Festival.

The 32nd edition of the BFI Flare: London Lgbt Film Festival has announced its opening and closing titles ahead of the event in March.

The festival will begin with Tali Shalom-Ezer’s My Days Of Mercy on Wednesday 21 March, and close with Steve McLean’s Postcards From London on Saturday 31 March.

From Princess director Shaolm-Ezer and starring Ellen Page (Juno, Inception, Freeheld) and Kate Mara (House Of Cards, The Martian), My Days Of Mercy is a love story between two women who differ in both their backgrounds and political perspectives.

The film is written by BAFTA nominated writer Joe Barton (The Ritual, iBoy), with Page and Mara producing alongside Christine Vachon and David Hinojosa. Great Point Media are handling international sales.

Postcards From London will have its European Premiere at the Festival; McClean’s first film since his 1994 Sundance hit Postcards From America is about Jim
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Best Visual Effects Oscar predictions: A vote for ‘War for the Planet of the Apes’ would honor the whole trilogy

Best Visual Effects Oscar predictions: A vote for ‘War for the Planet of the Apes’ would honor the whole trilogy
War for the Planet of the Apes” is nominated at the Oscars for Best Visual Effects, following nominations in the same category for 2011’s “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” and 2014’s “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes.” Neither “Rise” nor “Dawn” won Visual Effects in their respective years, despite showcasing some of the most realistic effects in film today. “War” is Oscar voters’ final shot at rewarding the film franchise’s groundbreaking visual effects, but much like in previous years, it could be an uphill battle.

War” is the latest nomination in the “Planet of the Apes” film series for VFX supervisors Joe Letteri, Daniel Barrett and Dan Lemmon, earning nominations for the first two films as well, with Joel Whist earning his first nom alongside them. Letteri is the director of the innovative VFX company Weta Digital, which has won six Oscars, for all three “Lord of the Rings” films,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Christopher Nolan’s ‘Dunkirk’ Broke the Rules by Ignoring Spielberg and Hiding Tom Hardy

Christopher Nolan’s ‘Dunkirk’ Broke the Rules by Ignoring Spielberg and Hiding Tom Hardy
Any filmmaker who wants to make a blockbuster has to find a new approach, within a frame of reference that the audience will accept. You’ve got to wow and provoke while maintaining mainstream appeal. That’s a steep, narrow, and risky path; ask “Blade Runner 2049” director Denis Villeneuve, who never wants to make an expensive art film again.

When it does work, you have the work of Christopher Nolan, who has gotten away with the time-twisting, low-budget claustrophobia of “Memento” to the ground-shifting, big-budget spectacle of “Inception.” That has given him — and his studio, Warner Bros. — reason to trust that audiences will go where he leads.

Even so, “Dunkirk” was a low-dialogue doozy. When he presented the 76-page script to the studio and asked for a blockbuster budget, he wondered, “Should I double-space it? I had no idea how long the film was going to be.”

Talking from
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Christopher Nolan’s ‘Dunkirk’ Broke the Rules by Ignoring Spielberg and Hiding Tom Hardy

  • Indiewire
Christopher Nolan’s ‘Dunkirk’ Broke the Rules by Ignoring Spielberg and Hiding Tom Hardy
Any filmmaker who wants to make a blockbuster has to find a new approach, within a frame of reference that the audience will accept. You’ve got to wow and provoke while maintaining mainstream appeal. That’s a steep, narrow, and risky path; ask “Blade Runner 2049” director Denis Villeneuve, who never wants to make an expensive art film again.

When it does work, you have the work of Christopher Nolan, who has gotten away with the time-twisting, low-budget claustrophobia of “Memento” to the ground-shifting, big-budget spectacle of “Inception.” That has given him — and his studio, Warner Bros. — reason to trust that audiences will go where he leads.

Even so, “Dunkirk” was a low-dialogue doozy. When he presented the 76-page script to the studio and asked for a blockbuster budget, he wondered, “Should I double-space it? I had no idea how long the film was going to be.”

Talking from
See full article at Indiewire »

BAFTA Awards 2018: Is it crazy to bet against Daniel Kaluuya for Rising Star?

BAFTA Awards 2018: Is it crazy to bet against Daniel Kaluuya for Rising Star?
Daniel Kaluuya‘s breakthrough performance in the horror-comedy “Get Out” has landed him two BAFTA nominations: Best Actor and the Rising Star Award for breakthrough performers. Kaluuya is the best-known Brit in the Rising Star category, which is decided by fans and not British academy members, so why isn’t he our front-runner to win?

According to the combined predictions of more than 1,400 users at Gold Derby, Kaluuya currently resides in second place in the race for Rising Star with odds of 6/1. But he’s not trailing a fellow Brit — American Timothee Chalamet is actually the heavy favorite with leading odds of 2/9. However, Chalamet would be only the third American to win. Also, the public votes for what it knows, and audiences definitely know “Get Out.”

Get Out” came out last February and was a hit both in the Us and internationally, grossing $254 million worldwide. And it’s currently available
See full article at Gold Derby »

Win The Geek’s Guide to Sf Cinema book

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Competitions

To mark the release of The Geek’s Guide to Sf Cinema by Ryan Lambie on 15th February, we’ve been given a bundle of The Geek’s Guide to Sf Cinema by Ryan Lambie and 2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke to give away, courtesy of Little, Brown Book Group.

The Geek’s Guide To Sf Cinema provides an entertaining and in-depth history of the science fiction genre’s pivotal and most influential movies. From the pioneering films of Georges Méliès to such blockbusters as Avatar and Inception in the 21st century, the book will explore how these key movies were made, how they reflected the mood of the time in which they were released and how they have influenced other filmmakers in the years since.

Historians and experts contribute to answer questions such as: ‘How important was Fritz Lang’s contribution to cinema?’; and
See full article at HeyUGuys »

The Cloverfield Paradox Review

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Daniel Goodwin

If anybody told me before I went to bed last night that I would be up at 4 am the following morning and writing a review of the new Cloverfield film, I would ask them to hand over whatever it was they were smoking or pass it off as a dream. No matter how much modern, software savvy sci-fi fans try to predict the precise moment a this film was going to drop, the film-makers and distributors were ahead of the game, waiting for that perfect moment to hurl it at us like a cine-custard pie without any kind of warning. With online speculation mounting but not quite at fever pitch, in the early hours of 5th February, The Cloverfield Paradox (formerly God Particle) arrived (on Netflix) making this Monday morning as welcome as a bank holiday after an surprisingly wild Sunday night on the tiles.

The story starts quite mawkishly,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Best Film Scores of the Century: Listen to a Playlist of IndieWire’s Top Picks

Best Film Scores of the Century: Listen to a Playlist of IndieWire’s Top Picks
Perhaps you’re trying to stay focused for a big creative project. Maybe you need something soothing as you’re going through weekend chores. You could just be an eternal fan of orchestral arrangements. Whatever the reason, there’s always room for a good film score playlist in your life.

Consider this a slight variation of the theme of our recently published list of the best film scores of the 21st century, a collection that includes a couple of household names (Hans Zimmer and John Williams, check and check), some recent favorites (Oneohtrix Point Never’s work on “Good Time” and Tamar-Kali’s lush “Mudbound” soundtrack), and iconic samplings from a trio of Paul Thomas Anderson films.

Read More:The 25 Best Movie Scores of the 21st Century

Below, you’ll find a Spotify sampler of tracks from all of IndieWire’s 25 picks, each with links to the full albums that they were taken from:

Now,
See full article at Indiewire »

Flatliners and 6 more of the greatest sci-fi thrillers of all-time

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Josh Wilding

Cinemas may be dominated by superhero movies these days but there’s still room for sci-fi. The great thing about the genre is that it can take on so many different forms whether that’s a thriller, horror movie, or even comedy (just look at Ghostbusters or Men in Black).

When it comes to thrillers, though, there are a lot of different movies which could fit into that category and singling out the greatest of all-time isn’t a particularly easy task.

However, to celebrate the release of Flatliners on DVD and Blu-ray on the 5th of February, we’ve chosen some of our favourites and we think you may be surprised by some of the choices made here. So, from movies set on Earth to space, the future, and more, these are the best of the best.

7. Flatliners

Flatliners became a cult classic after being released
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Film Review: ‘Braven’

Film Review: ‘Braven’
Some of the most impressive first features are those that don’t appear to be first features at all – that, instead, seem like the work of a seasoned pro who commits fully to familiar material, and somehow reinvigorates clichés and conventions. “Braven” marks the directorial debut of Lin Oeding, a veteran stunt coordinator and second unit director whose credits run the gamut from high-end studio projects (“The Equalizer,” “Inception”) to guilty-pleasure genre pastiches (“The Baytown Outlaws,” “Universal Soldier: Day of Reckoning”), so it’s hardly surprising that the fight scenes and run-and-gun clashes here are brutally efficient and efficiently brutal. What is unexpected is Oeding’s confidently unhurried, no-sweat approach to introducing characters and connections, and his straightforward, almost aggressively non-flashy attentiveness to such niceties as spatial relationships and cause-and-effect details during the rough stuff. If Don Siegel or John Sturges had lived long enough to try his hand at a VOD-centric melodrama, it probably
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Don’t give up hope, Christopher Nolan (‘Dunkirk’): One of our top users says you’ll still win Best Director Oscar

  • Gold Derby
After “Dunkirk” opened to some of the year’s strongest reviews and impressive box office last summer its director Christopher Nolan became the prohibitive Oscar front-runner. Since then, however, Guillermo Del Toro (“The Shape of Water“) has catapulted ahead of him with victories at the Golden Globes and Critics’ Choice Awards, and expected victories to come at the Directors Guild Awards and BAFTAs. But one of our top users is still holding out hope for Nolan at the Oscars, and there’s good reason to think he might be right.

The Shape of Water” is the most nominated film at the Oscars with 13 bids, and Del Toro is the overwhelming favorite for Best Director with 1/10 odds. But zack, one of the Top 24 Users who got the highest scores predicting last year’s Oscar winners, is holding out hope for Nolan. Not only that, zack actually tied for the second best
See full article at Gold Derby »

What film Should win Best Picture at 2018 Oscars: ‘Call Me By Your Name,’ ‘Dunkirk’ or … ? [Vote Now]

  • Gold Derby
What film Should win Best Picture at 2018 Oscars: ‘Call Me By Your Name,’ ‘Dunkirk’ or … ? [Vote Now]
Forget for a moment what you think Will win Best Picture at the 2018 Oscars. Instead, let’s talk about what Should win. Gold Derby recently unveiled our 2018 Oscars Dream Ballot and hundreds of readers have already voted for their favorites in all 24 categories. The early results may surprise you. For example, “The Shape of Water” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” have the best odds to win Best Picture, but they don’t even crack your Top 5 personal picks. Instead, you hope that either “Call Me By Your Name” or “Dunkirk” will take home the top prize.

Luca Guadagnino‘s gay coming-of-age story “Call Me By Your Name” earned four Oscar nominations: Best Picture, Best Actor for Timothee Chalamet, Best Adapted Screenplay for James Ivory and Best Original Song for “The Mystery of Love.” Fans’ appreciation for this film, which is based on Andre Aciman‘s 2007 novel, is like no
See full article at Gold Derby »

Christopher Nolan or Greta Gerwig will snatch DGA Award from Guillermo del Toro, our top Users declare

Christopher Nolan or Greta Gerwig will snatch DGA Award from Guillermo del Toro, our top Users declare
Saturday’s Directors Guild Awards will mark a shift in the directing race if some of our top Users are correct. Guillermo del Toro (“The Shape of Water”) is the favorite to take both the DGA and the Oscar, but he needs to watch out for not one but two people for the former first.

While del Toro is the DGA pick of all of our Experts and Editors, three of our Top 24 Users, who topped last year’s predictions, are going with Christopher Nolan (“Dunkirk”): Kevin Li, Felipe Bandeira and Alvaro Zuniga. Nolan also has the backing of two of our All-Star 24 Users, who have the best scores from the past two years: Sagand and GusCruz. Meanwhile, Top 24 User Sam Coffey and All-Star 24 User Brulash82 are calling an upset for Greta Gerwig (“Lady Bird”). Martin McDonagh (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”) and Jordan Peele (“Get Out”), the frontrunner for Best First-Time Director,
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: Why was Christopher Nolan’s ‘Dunkirk’ snubbed in key categories of acting and writing?

2018 Oscars: Why was Christopher Nolan’s ‘Dunkirk’ snubbed in key categories of acting and writing?
Christopher Nolan’s WWII epic “Dunkirk” was touted as the Best Picture favorite at the beginning of this awards season. This was to be the year that the master director finally got his just rewards from the academy after making a string of hits (seriously, has he made a bad film?) but failing to win any Oscars. He lost his two Best Original Screenplay Oscar bids [“Memento” (2001) and “Inception” (2011)] and also contended unsuccessfully as a producer of the latter. And he was inexcusably snubbed for “The Dark Knight.”

While “Dunkirk” did reap eight Oscar nominations, including a pair for Nolan as producer and director, it should have done better. While it contends in six below-the-line races — Cinematography, Film Editing, Original Score, Production Design, Sound Editing and Sound Mixing — it missed out on a screenplay nomination.

And the cast, led by two Sirs – Kenneth Branagh and Mark Rylance — was snubbed. Perhaps
See full article at Gold Derby »
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