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Damon Lindelof on Why We Need a New ‘Watchmen’ Now: ‘What We Think About Superheroes is Wrong’

HBO has yet to officially green light a “Watchmen” TV adaptation, but Damon Lindelof has been hard at work on the series for more than a month. Chronicled with sly references and clever comparisons on the showrunner’s Instagram account, the series — which received a pilot order from the premium cable network in September — has already generated a lot of buzz.

Read More:‘Watchmen’: Why The Length of the HBO Series Will Affect the Story

On Saturday afternoon, Lindelof spoke publicly about the project for the first time. He took part in a panel at Vulture Fest along with “The Good Place” creator Mike Schur and was asked by Vulture’s West Coast Editor Josef Adalian why he decided to follow-up his critically acclaimed series “The Leftovers” with a comic book adaptation.

Prefacing his point with his memory of the original graphic novel, Lindelof said, “‘Watchmen’ was dangerous.”

“The
See full article at Indiewire »

Damon Lindelof on Why We Need a New ‘Watchmen’ Now: ‘What We Think About Superheroes is Wrong’

HBO has yet to officially green light a “Watchmen” TV adaptation, but Damon Lindelof has been hard at work on the series for more than a month. Chronicled with sly references and clever comparisons on the showrunner’s Instagram account, the series — which received a pilot order from the premium cable network in September — has already generated a lot of buzz.

Read More:‘Watchmen’: Why The Length of the HBO Series Will Affect the Story

On Saturday afternoon, Lindelof spoke publicly about the project for the first time. He took part in a panel at Vulture Fest along with “The Good Place” creator Mike Schur and was asked by Vulture’s West Coast Editor Josef Adalian why he decided to follow-up his critically acclaimed series “The Leftovers” with a comic book adaptation.

Prefacing his point with his memory of the original graphic novel, Lindelof said, “‘Watchmen’ was dangerous.”

“The
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Tom Tykwer to Preside Over 2018 Berlin Film Festival Jury

Tom Tykwer to Preside Over 2018 Berlin Film Festival Jury
Tom Tykwer, the director of “Run Lola Run,” “Cloud Atlas” and “A Hologram for the King,” has been chosen to preside over the jury of the 2018 Berlin Film Festival.

The 52-year-old Tykwer has had six of his films screen at previous Berlinales. He is also the director of the ambitious new German TV series “Babylon Berlin,” one of the most expensive dramas to be made in Europe.

Tom Tykwer is one of the highest-profile German directors and has established himself on the international stage as a great filmmaker. His outstanding talent and innovative trademark have been on display in a variety of film genres,” said Dieter Kosslick, the festival director.

“The Berlinale has always been my favorite and my home film festival, and has supported me since I began working as a filmmaker,” Tykwer added. “We have a fantastic and broad history with each other. Now I can look forward to two focused and fun weeks of films
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tom Tykwer Named Berlin Festival Jury President

Tom Tykwer Named Berlin Festival Jury President
German director Tom Tykwer will be the jury president of the 68th Berlin International Film Festival.

The director of Run Lola Run, Cloud Atlas and A Hologram for the King is one of Germany's best-known and most successful filmmakers and one inextricably linked with the city of Berlin, where he lives and where he first started in the film business, initially as a projectionist and programmer for the art house cinema Moviemento and then as a founding partner in leading indie production company X Filme Creative Pool.

Tykwer is also intimately connected to the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Tom Hanks to Star in ‘Bios’ from “Hardhome” Director Miguel Sapochnik

  • Collider.com
Tom Hanks is continuing to find new and exciting projects in his career, confident in his status as a beloved everyman and obviously taking on films that appeal to his interest like Cloud Atlas and A Hologram for the King with stuff like the Robert Langdon movies to pay the bills and remaining on top with prestige pictures like Sully and Bridge of Spies. Thankfully, the balance he has struck allows him to keep doing intriguing pictures like Bios. According to Variety, Hanks is set to lead the sci-fi film with Game of Thrones helmer Miguel Sapochnik (“Hardhome”, “Battle …
See full article at Collider.com »

Geostorm movie review: weather bomb

MaryAnn’s quick take… Almost hilariously terrible: absurd plot machinations, dubious politics, not a single character to care about. And it doesn’t even give good disaster porn. I’m “biast” (pro): big science fiction fan

I’m “biast” (con): not a fan of what Hollywood often does with sci fi

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

Who was it who said, “Everybody talks about the weather, but no one does anything about it”? Well, we showed that guy! After the catastrophic weather year of 2019 (which apparently made 2017 look like a pleasantly warm and breezy day), we — that is, humanity — “fought back” against, I guess, ourselves and the climate disasters we brought upon our planet, by launching a network of weather-control satellites covering the entire globe, and operated from a newly supercool International Space Station, which has a big wheel and gravity and factories to make more satellites,
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

St. Louis: We Have Passes to an Advance Screening of ‘Geostorm’ Up For Grabs!

Fiends! Who loves disaster films?! We have some passes to an Advance Screening to Geostorm on Wednesday, October 18. We’ve made this one super simple for you as well.

After an unprecedented series of natural disasters threatened the planet, the world’s leaders came together to create an intricate network of satellites to control the global climate and keep everyone safe. But now, something has gone wrong—the system built to protect the Earth is attacking it, and it’s a race against the clock to uncover the real threat before a worldwide geostorm wipes out everything…and everyone along with it.

Dean Devlin (writer/producer, “Independence Day”) makes his feature film directorial debut with suspense thriller “Geostorm,” starring Gerard Butler (“Olympus Has Fallen,” “300”), Jim Sturgess (“Cloud Atlas”), Abbie Cornish (“Limitless”), Alexandra Maria Lara (“Rush”), Daniel Wu (“The Man with the Iron Fists,” “Warcraft: The Beginning”), with Oscar nominees Ed Harris (“The Hours,
See full article at Destroy the Brain »

Win Passes To The Advance Screening Of Geostorm In St. Louis

After an unprecedented series of natural disasters threatened the planet, the world’s leaders came together to create an intricate network of satellites to control the global climate and keep everyone safe. But now, something has gone wrong—the system built to protect the Earth is attacking it, and it’s a race against the clock to uncover the real threat before a worldwide geostorm wipes out everything…and everyone along with it.

Dean Devlin (writer/producer, “Independence Day”) makes his feature film directorial debut with suspense thriller “Geostorm,” starring Gerard Butler (“Olympus Has Fallen,” “300”), Jim Sturgess (“Cloud Atlas”), Abbie Cornish (“Limitless”), Alexandra Maria Lara (“Rush”), Daniel Wu (“The Man with the Iron Fists,” “Warcraft: The Beginning”), Eugenio Derbez (“How to Be a Latin Lover”), with Oscar nominees Ed Harris (“The Hours,” “Apollo 13”) and Andy Garcia (“The Godfather: Part III”).

The music is by Lorne Balfe (“The Lego® Batman
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

18 Actors Who Were Almost Marvel's Star-Lord

  • MovieWeb
18 Actors Who Were Almost Marvel's Star-Lord
Guardians of the Galaxy was considered a risky proposition for Marvel Studios, even after the runaway success of their cinematic universe building films like Iron Man and The Avengers. These characters hang around in outer space! There are aliens on the team! There's a talking raccoon! So it was nothing short of incredible when Guardians of the Galaxy earned nearly $800 million and a 91% on Rotten Tomatoes. A big part of James Gunn's action-comedy masterpiece depends upon the charisma of Chris Pratt, who leads the team as Peter Quill, the film's relatable half-earthling who rocks badass tunes in his headphones while kicking ass as Star-Lord. But it almost didn't happen that way. As there were plenty of other big names vying for the coveted role.

It may seem crazy to think about now, but at the time, Pratt was mostly known as lovable doofus and Mouse Rat frontman Andy Dwyer on NBC's Parks and Recreation.
See full article at MovieWeb »

‘Sense8’ Series Finale Special: Screenwriters and Potential Locations Revealed

‘Sense8’ Series Finale Special: Screenwriters and Potential Locations Revealed
For those looking for proof of what fandom can achieve, behold: The script for the “‘Sense8 Special,” which will wrap up the fan favorite Netflix drama following its abrupt cancelation this spring, physically exists!

While initially canceled following the release of Season 2, fan outcry led Netflix to reverse that decision and produce a two-hour finale, and as seen in the Instagram photo above from star Miguel Angel Silvestre (who plays no-longer-closeted movie star Lito on the show), watermarked scripts have been distributed to the actors.

Beyond proof-of-life, the cover page reveals a number of important details about the upcoming production. For one thing, Lana J. Wachowski (the first time she’s used the letter J with her name?) is credited with writing the script alongside David Mitchell and Aleksandar Hemon. Both men are novelists, with Mitchell having a pre-established connection to the Wachowski tribe: He wrote the original novel “Cloud Atlas,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Sense8’ Series Finale Special: Screenwriters and Potential Locations Revealed

  • Indiewire
‘Sense8’ Series Finale Special: Screenwriters and Potential Locations Revealed
For those looking for proof of what fandom can achieve, behold: The script for the “‘Sense8 Special,” which will wrap up the fan favorite Netflix drama following its abrupt cancelation this spring, physically exists!

While initially canceled following the release of Season 2, fan outcry led Netflix to reverse that decision and produce a two-hour finale, and as seen in the Instagram photo above from star Miguel Angel Silvestre (who plays no-longer-closeted movie star Lito on the show), watermarked scripts have been distributed to the actors.

Beyond proof-of-life, the cover page reveals a number of important details about the upcoming production. For one thing, Lana J. Wachowski (the first time she’s used the letter J with her name?) is credited with writing the script alongside David Mitchell and Aleksandar Hemon. Both men are novelists, with Mitchell having a pre-established connection to the Wachowski tribe: He wrote the original novel “Cloud Atlas,
See full article at Indiewire »

Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams – The Impossible Planet Review

Villordsutch reviews Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams: The Impossible Planet…

Episode two of Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams is titled The Impossible Planet. Originally published back in 1953 within the American Science Fiction and Fantasy magazine Imagination, this latest iteration is delivered by David Farr (The Night Manager, Hanna, McMafia) who is handling both writing and directing duties.

Set far in the distant future, we find two disenchanted Interstellar Tour Guides, Brian Norton (Jack Reynor) and Ed Andrews (Benedict Wong), trapped on a backwater planet called Primo76, entertaining droves of tourists with visually enhanced excursions throughout the galaxy. Then opportunity knocks in the form of a deaf, elderly woman called Irma Gordon (Geraldine Chaplin) and her robot RB29 (Malik Ibheis), who wishes to see Earth one last time and will pay cash to do so.

Seeing this as an unmissable chance Andrews convinces Norton that he can scam Mrs.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Emmy-Nominated Cinematographers Reflect on How TV Has Helped Their Craft Evolve

Emmy-Nominated Cinematographers Reflect on How TV Has Helped Their Craft Evolve
At the dawn of television, feature cinematographers were leery of becoming involved in the new medium, which many associated with diminished prestige. TV’s shortcomings in comparison with the glories of the silver screen included severe time constraints, tight budgets and the vagaries of network distribution.

Now, with the advent of what many are calling TV’s golden age, the segregation between film and TV cinematography is a thing of the past. This year’s Emmy-nominated DPs have many reasons for embracing the small screen. (The four who were contacted for this story spoke before the Dp winners were announced at the Creative Arts Emmys.)

Two-time Oscar-winning cinematographer John Toll, previously known almost exclusively for his cinema work, came onto Netflix’s “Sense8” after making two features (“Cloud Atlas” and “Jupiter Ascending”) with its creators, Lana and Lilly Wachowski.

He says his decision to shoot for television on the project was a natural extension of that working
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Lars von Trier on Kanye: The Five Best Music Documentaries that Haven’t Been Made Yet

  • Indiewire
Lars von Trier on Kanye: The Five Best Music Documentaries that Haven’t Been Made Yet
News of Todd Haynes making his first documentary should’ve come as something of a curveball, but it was reported that the “Carol” director is planning a non-fiction project about the Velvet Underground, it seemed like the most natural thing in the world. Haynes’ “Velvet Goldmine” is such a knowing, textured, and vividly remembered reflection on the glam rock era that it can be easy to forget that its story merely alludes to the likes of Lou Reed.

But the fascination the Velvet Underground holds for Haynes isn’t the only thing that makes this newly announced documentary feel like such a perfect pairing between subject and storyteller. With the landmark “The Velvet Underground & Nico” LP, Reed and his cohorts effectively forged a new language for countercultural expression, synthesizing the subversive pop stylings of Andy Warhol into a rock movement that had already been neutered of its rebellious beginnings. With films like “Poison” and “Safe,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Detroit’: Here’s Why Annapurna Was Smart to Release an Awards Movie in August

  • Indiewire
‘Detroit’: Here’s Why Annapurna Was Smart to Release an Awards Movie in August
Monday-morning quarterbacking is in full effect after Kathryn Bigelow’s “Detroit” opened wide to $7.6 million after a week in limited release. The biggest single target of blame is distributor Annapurna Films’ choice of an August release date for the first film from the distribution arm of Megan Ellison’s high-flying production company (“American Hustle,” “Her,” “The Master”).

Lacking time travel, it’s impossible to predict what the alternative result would have been. But let’s start with the assumption that the team at Annapurna analyzed all options. A case can be made that, faced with a tough film to market, August contained a logic that a fall release did not.

Straight Outta Compton

What Made August Appealing?

Late summer brought both opportunity and precedent. Studio distribution operates under a number of preconceptions, with a heavy reliance on history. Key dates belong to the highest-budget releases that need worldwide success and near-simultaneous release.
See full article at Indiewire »

New to Streaming: ‘Alien: Covenant,’ ‘Shin Godzilla,’ ‘Adaptation,’ ‘Slack Bay,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Adaptation (Spike Jonze)

It’s almost depressing to rewatch Adaptation in 2016, because it’s a reminder of how strong an actor Nicolas Cage is when he actually invests himself in good projects. It was soon after this that his career went off the rails, but he’s remarkably impressive here, playing the dual roles of Charlie Kaufman and his fictional twin brother, Donald. As much a mind-fuck as any other Kaufman screenplay,
See full article at The Film Stage »

The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in August 2017

  • Indiewire
The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in August 2017
Dozens of movies are hitting Netflix during the dog days of summer (click here for a complete list), but the sheer variety of new titles can be daunting. Movies are long, time is short, and indecision is brutal, so — in the hopes of helping you out — here are the seven best films that are coming to Netflix in August.

7. “Practical Magic” (1998)

Okay, so “Practical Magic” isn’t a “good movie” in the traditional sense…or in any other sense, for that matter. But it’s a perfect Netflix movie, which is another beast entirely. An incredible time capsule — and bottomless gif resource — from an ancient epoch that historians refer to as “1998,” this essential relic tells the story of sisters Sally (Sandra Bullock) and Gillian (Nicole Kidman) Owens, twin witches who are effectively cursed to remain single forever.

Did I mention that it was directed by Griffin Dunne? Did I mention that it was nominated for a Blockbuster Entertainment Award for including a Faith Hill song on the soundtrack? Did I mention that it features a scene in which Dianne Wiest and Stockard Channing use their secret powers to blend alcoholic drinks in order to lubricate a singalong set to Harry Nilsson’s “Put the Lime in the Coconut”? “Practical Magic” was kind of a blip when it first opened, but it would shake our culture to its skeleton if it came out today. A remake feels inevitable, but in the meantime, the original makes for perfect streaming on a lazy August afternoon. Better yet, add it to your queue and swing back once Halloween rolls around.

Begins streaming August 1st.

6. “The Bomb” (2016)

“the bomb” was one of the most exciting, unclassifiable experiences on the festival circuit last year, but the sheer magnitude of the project made it unclear where it might live once it had finished traveling the world, or if it would be possible for the public to see it. Fortunately, the answers to those questions turned out to be “everywhere” and “very.” Here’s IndieWire’s Steve Greene on the 59-minute film into which this enormous piece of experimental art has been newly reshaped:

Read More‘the bomb’ Review: New Doc on Netflix Is a Surreal Music Video About the End of the World

Directed by Kevin Ford, Smriti Keshari, and Eric Schlosser, this experimental, sensory history of the nuclear bomb is a staggering look at the world’s most destructive weapon and the lessons of almost eight decades that some still choose to ignore. Threading together modern-day news footage, Cold War era safety videos and grainy archival peeks into the construction process, “the bomb” looks at nuclear weapons in their myriad historic forms. Foregoing the usual talking head interviews or explanatory narration, the one piece of connective tissue throughout the film, besides the subject itself, is the film’s score, from Los Angeles electronic minimalist outfit The Acid. Throughout a harrowing parade of images and fleeting moments of whimsy, the droning, pulsating music underneath brings an alternating sense of dread and power.

Begins streaming August 1st.

5. “Cloud Atlas” (2012)

It’s easy to make fun of “Cloud Atlas,” and not just because one of the six characters that Tom Hanks plays is pretty much a live-action Jar Jar Binks. Tom Tykwer and the Wachowskis’ cosmically ambitious sci-fi epic is — in its own delirious way — one of the most earnest movies ever made. Adapted from David Mitchell’s novel of the same name, and now something of an obvious precursor to the Wachowskis’ Netflix series “Sense 8,” this symphonic story of spiritual connection spans from 1849 to 2321 in a go-for-broke attempt to crystallize the effects that one life can have on countless others.

Controversially casting individual actors in multiple roles (with many of the film’s most famous stars disguising themselves as different races and genders), “Cloud Atlas” fearlessly envisions our world as a place where bodies are temporary, but love is eternal. It’s a lot to swallow, but our collective cynicism only makes the movie more valuable, and more important to have on hand.

Begins streaming August 1st.

4. “Donald Cried” (2016)

Kris Avedisian flew under the radar when “Donald Cried” made the rounds last year — his self-directed turn as the most deeply committed man-child since “Clifford” may have been just a bit too raw and cringe-inducing for any major traction — but it’s only a matter of time before people discover one of the most fearless performances in recent memory. Here’s IndieWire’s Eric Kohn on a future dark comedy classic:

The obnoxious man-child is a common trope in American comedies, but few recent examples can match the hilariously unsettling presence of Donald Treebeck, the obnoxious central figure played by writer-director Kris Avedisian in his effective black comedy “Donald Cried.” While the story technically unfolds from the perspective of his old teen pal Peter (Jesse Wakeman), who returns to their Rhode Island suburbs from his Wall Street career after his grandmother dies, Donald welcomes his reluctant friend back to their world and won’t leave him alone. Avedisian gives Danny McBride a run for his money in this pitch-perfect embodiment of a wannabe charmer all too eager to remain the center of attention. Hardly reinventing the wheel, “Donald Cried” nevertheless spins it faster than usual, taking cues from its memorably irritating protagonist. Beneath its entertainment value, the movie also hints at the tragedy of aimless adulthood.

Begins streaming August 15th.

3. “The Matrix” (1999)

At this point, “The Matrix” has effectively become immune to any sort of qualitative criticism; there’s no use arguing that it’s “good” or “bad” or somewhere in between, it simply is. Less a movie than a cornerstone of contemporary pop culture (for better or worse), the Wachowskis’ absurdly influential orgy of mind-blowing action and high school philosophy arrived at the tail end of the 20th century in order to help define the 21st. Its aesthetic impact on the current breed of blockbusters is self-evident, but its more profound contributions have been largely off-screen, as the film brought futurism to the masses in a way that’s only possible to trace through its most unfortunate side effects (e.g. the diseased misogyny of “red pill” thinking).

Of course, “No can be told what the Matrix is. You have to see it for yourself.” Now that it’s on Netflix, it couldn’t be easier to do just that.

Begins streaming August 1st.

2. “Jackie Brown” (1997)

Every hardcore Tarantino fan’s favorite Tarantino film, “Jackie Brown” is more than just an homage to blaxploitation or the best Elmore Leonard adaptation ever made (sorry, “Out of Sight”), it’s also something of a tribute to all of the crime writer’s work and the scuzzy but soulful ethos that bound it together. To this day, “Jackie Brown” remains a major outlier for Qt. For one thing, it’s based on pre-existing material. For another, it’s got a bonafide sex scene. Last but not least, it’s about recognizably human characters who have genuine depth, who have real lives that feel as though they continue beyond the confines of a movie screen (no disrespect to the cartoonish avatars who populate Tarantino’s later, more solipsistic work — they serve their purpose to perfection).

Pam Grier is spectacular in the title role of a flight attendant with a drug smuggling side hustle. Robert Forster is heartbreaking as lovelorn bondsman Max Cherry. Hell, even Robert De Niro is phenomenal, the iconic actor beautifully playing against his legend by inhabiting the film’s most pathetic and disposable character. For anyone put off by the blockbuster scale of Tarantino’s recent work, “Jackie Brown” is a rock-solid reminder of his genius for elevating fevered pastiche into singular pathos. And the soundtrack owns.

Begins streaming August 1st.

1. “All These Sleepless Nights” (2016)

It would be reductive and unfair to say that Michal Marczak’s “All These Sleepless Nights” is the film that Terrence Malick has been trying to make for the last 10 years, but it certainly feels that way while you’re watching it. A mesmeric, free-floating odyssey that wends its way through a hazy year in the molten lives of two Polish twentysomethings, this unclassifiable wonder obscures the divide between fiction and documentary until the distinction is ultimately irrelevant.

Read MoreReview: ‘All These Sleepless Nights’ Is the Movie That Terrence Malick Has Been Trying to Make

Unfolding like a plotless reality show that was shot by Emmanuel Lubezki, this lucid dream of a movie paints an unmoored portrait of a city in the throes of an orgastic reawakening. From the opening images of fireworks exploding over downtown Warsaw, to the stunning final glimpse of Marczak’s main subject — Krzysztof Baginski (playing himself, as everyone does), who looks and moves like a young Baryshnikov — twirling between an endless row of stopped cars during the middle of a massive traffic jam, the film is high on the spirit of liberation. More than just a hypnotically hyper-real distillation of what it means to be young, “All These Sleepless Nights” is a haunted vision of what it means to have been young.

Begins streaming August 15th.

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See full article at Indiewire »

6 ‘Unadaptable’ Books That Were Turned Into Movies, From ‘Watchmen’ to ‘Cloud Atlas’

  • Indiewire
6 ‘Unadaptable’ Books That Were Turned Into Movies, From ‘Watchmen’ to ‘Cloud Atlas’
Never tell Hollywood it can’t do something. Over the years, the entertainment industry has gamely (and, often, unwisely) taken on projects that have been deemed unadaptable, often by their very own authors and creators. Such a film is bound for the big screen later this week, when Nikolaj Arcel’s already embattled “The Dark Tower” arrives, attempting to prove to audiences that adapting a sprawling Stephen King opus into a movie and television franchise after nearly a decade of starts and stops is, in fact, a good idea. It’s hardly the only example of such a gamble, and few similar attempts have managed to pay out, either financially or creatively.

Read More‘The Dark Tower’ Tested So Poorly That Sony Considered Replacing Director — Report

Sometimes “unadaptable” is just that, and perhaps even the best of books simply isn’t suited for a splashy filmed version. While it remains
See full article at Indiewire »

Here’s What’s Coming to Netflix in August 2017

  • Collider.com
Netflix has announced their streaming additions for August 2017, and there are plenty of fine selections. Among the more notable titles are Bad Santa, Cloud Atlas, Innerspace, Jackie Brown, Sleepy Hollow, The Addams Family, The Matrix, Beautiful Creatures, Season 1 of The Good Place, and the one-shot rom-com The Wedding Party. There’s also some noteworthy originals that should be worth your time including Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later, The Defenders, What Happened to Monday, and Death Note. Check out the full list of additions below, and if you need some help deciding on what to …
See full article at Collider.com »

9 Films New to Netflix to Watch in August 2017, Including ‘The Matrix’ Trilogy and ‘Jackie Brown’

  • Indiewire
9 Films New to Netflix to Watch in August 2017, Including ‘The Matrix’ Trilogy and ‘Jackie Brown’
Netflix may have cancelled the Wachowski’s cult hit “Sense 8,” but its adding two of their defining works to its streaming library next month. All three entries in “The Matrix” trilogy are heading to Netflix, as is the ambitious “Cloud Atlas,” which means you’ll be able to bring summer to an end by bingeing mind-melting science fiction.

Read More: Netflix Is Not the Problem: Why Bad Theatrical Presentations Are Destroying the Experience

Other titles joining the streaming service include underrated gems from Quentin Tarantino and Michael Haneke, plus two of the year’s most exciting documentary films. Check out a complete list of all the new movies joining Netflix in August 2017 below, including our 7 must-binge choices.

The Matrix” Trilogy (August 1)

August kicks off with “The Matrix,” “The Matrix Reloaded” and “The Matrix Revolutions” all becoming available to stream on Netflix. Say what you want about the two sequels, but
See full article at Indiewire »
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