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How Greta Gerwig Found Her Voice with Lady Bird — and an Oscar Nomination!

How Greta Gerwig Found Her Voice with Lady Bird — and an Oscar Nomination!
In Mistress America, the second film Greta Gerwig wrote with her now-boyfriend Noah Baumbach, one of the characters proclaims, “Sometimes I think I’m a genius and I wish I could just fast-forward my life to the part where everyone knows it.”

Gerwig, 34, has been the darling of the indie film scene for nearly a decade, starring in low-budget, quirky coming-of-age films, some of which she also wrote, like Frances Ha, and little-seen gems like Hannah Takes the Stairs and Lola Versus. Last year, she ventured into slightly more commercial roles with Jackie, starring Natalie Portman, and 20th Century Women,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Greta Gerwig's Big Year: How She Finally Found Her Voice with Lady Bird — and Maybe an Oscar!

Greta Gerwig's Big Year: How She Finally Found Her Voice with Lady Bird — and Maybe an Oscar!
In Mistress America, the second film Greta Gerwig wrote with her now-boyfriend Noah Baumbach, one of the characters proclaims, “Sometimes I think I’m a genius and I wish I could just fast-forward my life to the part where everyone knows it.”

Gerwig, 34, has been the darling of the indie film scene for nearly a decade, starring in low-budget, quirky coming-of-age films, some of which she also wrote, like Frances Ha, and little-seen gems like Hannah Takes the Stairs and Lola Versus. Last year, she ventured into slightly more commercial roles with Jackie, starring Natalie Portman, and 20th Century Women,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Becoming ‘Lady Bird’: Greta Gerwig Reflects on 8 Life-Changing Moments That Made Her a Director

Becoming ‘Lady Bird’: Greta Gerwig Reflects on 8 Life-Changing Moments That Made Her a Director
Greta Gerwig has a story about the moment she knew she would become a director. Shortly after she starred in and co-wrote “Frances Ha” with Noah Baumbach, she met “Orlando” director Sally Potter at a party. Gerwig cornered Potter, to pick her brain.

“I do that with people I admire,” Gerwig said. “I was writing a lot. I was asking her about how she does what she does. Does she do it first thing in the morning in longhand, or many computer drafts? I was being nerdy and needy, and she was answering and being very kind.

“Then she grabbed me by the arm and looked me in the eyes and asked me, ‘What do you really want to ask me about?’ My blood ran cold. ‘You really want to ask me about directing.’

How do you know that?’

‘I’m part gypsy and it’s written all over you!
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Becoming ‘Lady Bird’: Greta Gerwig Reflects on 8 Life-Changing Moments That Made Her a Director

  • Indiewire
Becoming ‘Lady Bird’: Greta Gerwig Reflects on 8 Life-Changing Moments That Made Her a Director
Greta Gerwig has a story about the moment she knew she would become a director. Shortly after she starred in and co-wrote “Frances Ha” with Noah Baumbach, she met “Orlando” director Sally Potter at a party. Gerwig cornered Potter, to pick her brain.

“I do that with people I admire,” Gerwig said. “I was writing a lot. I was asking her about how she does what she does. Does she do it first thing in the morning in longhand, or many computer drafts? I was being nerdy and needy, and she was answering and being very kind.

“Then she grabbed me by the arm and looked me in the eyes and asked me, ‘What do you really want to ask me about?’ My blood ran cold. ‘You really want to ask me about directing.’

How do you know that?’

‘I’m part gypsy and it’s written all over you!
See full article at Indiewire »

A24’s Oscar Blitz: How The Studio is Positioning 9 Contenders After ‘Moonlight’s Best Picture Win

A24’s Oscar Blitz: How The Studio is Positioning 9 Contenders After ‘Moonlight’s Best Picture Win
After last year’s three-Oscar haul for “Moonlight,” including Best Picture, A24 wants to prove that was no anomaly. Here’s what the rising young distributor will push this awards season. (Remember: A year ago, “Moonlight” wasn’t viewed as a likely Best Picture contender — much less the big winner.)

Co-founded by David Fenkel, John Hodges, and Daniel Katz, A24 is known for edgy arthouse pleasers that eschew conventional storytelling. “Moonlight” was the company’s first original production; its other box office players include Oscar-winners “Ex Machina,” “Room,” and “Amy,” and smart horror flick “The Witch.” But none have passed the $27 million box office earned by “Moonlight.”

Read More:Why Greta Gerwig’s ‘Lady Bird’ Is a Serious Oscar Contender

After the fall trifecta of Venice, Telluride and Toronto, the company has three bonafide awards contenders: SXSW’s well-reviewed true story “The Disaster Artist” (December 1), director James Franco’s 14th
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

A24’s Oscar Blitz: How The Studio is Positioning 9 Contenders After ‘Moonlight’s Best Picture Win

  • Indiewire
A24’s Oscar Blitz: How The Studio is Positioning 9 Contenders After ‘Moonlight’s Best Picture Win
After last year’s three-Oscar haul for “Moonlight,” including Best Picture, A24 wants to prove that was no anomaly. Here’s what the rising young distributor will push this awards season. (Remember: A year ago, “Moonlight” wasn’t viewed as a likely Best Picture contender — much less the big winner.)

Co-founded by David Fenkel, John Hodges, and Daniel Katz, A24 is known for edgy arthouse pleasers that eschew conventional storytelling. “Moonlight” was the company’s first original production; its other box office players include Oscar-winners “Ex Machina,” “Room,” and “Amy,” and smart horror flick “The Witch.” But none have passed the $27 million box office earned by “Moonlight.”

Read More:Why Greta Gerwig’s ‘Lady Bird’ Is a Serious Oscar Contender

After the fall trifecta of Venice, Telluride and Toronto, the company has three bonafide awards contenders: SXSW’s well-reviewed true story “The Disaster Artist” (December 1), director James Franco’s 14th
See full article at Indiewire »

Why Greta Gerwig’s ‘Lady Bird’ Is a Serious Oscar Contender

Why Greta Gerwig’s ‘Lady Bird’ Is a Serious Oscar Contender
Count on the Telluride Film Festival to deliver a surprise or two. Going in, buzz on Joe Wright’s Winston Churchill drama “Darkest Hour” had already reached a dull roar — and folks were prepared to be impressed by Annette Bening in “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool,” Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water,” and Angelina Jolie’s Cambodia movie, “First They Killed My Father.”

But the movie that is building momentum as it hits Toronto, the one that A24 yet again will take all the way to Best Picture contention that could win a few Oscars (as “Moonlight” did last year), is Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird.”

Read More:6 Things We Learned at Telluride, Including Oscar Chances for Greta Gerwig, Angelina Jolie, and Gary Oldman

Some people who like the movie well enough are saying it’s a small coming-of-age movie in an all-too-familiar high school setting.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Why Greta Gerwig’s ‘Lady Bird’ Is a Serious Oscar Contender

  • Indiewire
Why Greta Gerwig’s ‘Lady Bird’ Is a Serious Oscar Contender
Count on the Telluride Film Festival to deliver a surprise or two. Going in, buzz on Joe Wright’s Winston Churchill drama “Darkest Hour” had already reached a dull roar — and folks were prepared to be impressed by Annette Bening in “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool,” Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water,” and Angelina Jolie’s Cambodia movie, “First They Killed My Father.”

But the movie that is building momentum as it hits Toronto, the one that A24 yet again will take all the way to Best Picture contention that could win a few Oscars (as “Moonlight” did last year), is Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird.”

Read More:6 Things We Learned at Telluride, Including Oscar Chances for Greta Gerwig, Angelina Jolie, and Gary Oldman

Some people who like the movie well enough are saying it’s a small coming-of-age movie in an all-too-familiar high school setting.
See full article at Indiewire »

Barry Jenkins Shares Charming Story About Meeting Greta Gerwig For ‘Lady Bird’ Premiere

Barry Jenkins Shares Charming Story About Meeting Greta Gerwig For ‘Lady Bird’ Premiere
Last fall, Barry Jenkins was a little-known filmmaker with one feature under his belt, 2008’s “Medicine for Melancholy.” Then he premiered future best picture winner “Moonlight” at the 2016 Telluride Film Festival and everything changed. At the 2017 edition, he returned the favor, not only introducing a series of short film programs at the festival as he has for years, but also by presenting another rising filmmaker to the world.

Read More:‘Lady Bird’ Trailer: Saoirse Ronan Delivers Her Greatest Work in Greta Gerwig’s Brilliant Directorial Debut

Just a few hours after receiving a standing ovation for one of his short film programs, Jenkins took the stage at the Chuck Jones Cinema for the world premiere of “Lady Bird,” the coming-of-age comedy that marks the solo directorial debut of veteran actress Greta Gerwig. There was a practical connection between “Lady Bird” and “Moonlight,” in that both movies share A24 as a distributor.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Hannah Takes the Stairs’ and the Coalescence of Mumblecore

Looking back on this still-young century makes clear that 2007 was a major time for cinematic happenings — and, on the basis of this retrospective, one we’re not quite through with ten years on. One’s mind might quickly flash to a few big titles that will be represented, but it is the plurality of both festival and theatrical premieres that truly surprises: late works from old masters, debuts from filmmakers who’ve since become some of our most-respected artists, and mid-career turning points that didn’t necessarily announce themselves as such at the time. Join us as an assembled team, many of whom were coming of age that year, takes on their favorites.

Declaring 2007 to be the year mumblecore came of age would be equally as fair as labeling it the year mumblecore collapsed. The signs of ascendance and coalescence—group coverage in high-profile publications, series programmed at art houses,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Video Essay. Greta Moves

There are a few actors whose prowess stems in equal measure from their training or innate talent, and from their physiognomy. In the past we had Humphrey Bogart and Anna Karina. Today, Denis Lavant is one of those actors. Adam Driver also comes to mind. Greta Gerwig, with her lanky figure and mesmerizing expression, belongs to a category all her own.There’s a particular quality that comes to life when she moves. The movement might be as slight as bend in the lips, or as large as a star-figured jump in the air. Both are, in equal measure, unmistakably hers. Throughout her career, Gerwig has worked with directors who’ve captured her physicality by letting the film run long enough to capture the uniqueness of her movement. It took Joe Swanberg the entirety of Lol (2006) and 20 minutes of Hannah takes the Stairs (2007) to ask Gerwig to dance in front of the camera. This can only be explained by the director’s inexperience at the time. Noah Baumbach never made the same mistake, filming her twisting, twirling, and swirling, or just slightly bobbing for 17 seconds, to the tune of Paul and Linda McCartney’s “Uncle Albert”. Even for her small role in No Strings Attached (2011), Ivan Reitman had the good sense to shoot two scenes where Greta’s dancing held center stage. In Greta Moves, I endeavored to find patterns in the movements throughout her filmography, interweaving them with an abundance of match cuts. To create a dance tapestry that heightened those connections, the piece of music was fundamental. The inspiration for that choice—as well as the structure of the video essay—came from Wim Wender’s Pina (2011). The work was built almost entirely around the second performance in the movie and the lovely melody of Jun Miyake, “The Here and After”.
See full article at MUBI »

How the SXSW 2017 Film Festival Shows Us the Future of the Movies

How the SXSW 2017 Film Festival Shows Us the Future of the Movies
Over the past decade, South By Southwest has become 10 days of hand-to-hand combat between media and technology. Nestled within that war zone is a film festival — this year, 125 features screen at the SXSW Film Festival, including 51 from first-timers. Most come to town without distribution, and they may never see a bigger audience than this one.

The film festival is a solid platform for discovering new filmmakers; if you want to explore the connective tissue of contemporary American cinema, few other places offer such a fertile arena. Unlike industry heavyhitter Sundance, it’s not a fast-paced marketplace — but the SXSW conference is still one of the biggest windows into the future of the movies because so much of it has nothing to do with the movies at all.

This year, SXSW Film’s marquee titles duke it out with the TV shows in the Episodics section. (Among its premieres are two
See full article at Indiewire »

Peter Travers' 2017 Alt-Oscars: From Scorsese to 'Deadpool'

Peter Travers' 2017 Alt-Oscars: From Scorsese to 'Deadpool'
Come Sunday, a.k.a. Oscars night, we'll all be tipping our hats to the year's winners. But before we do that, here's to the "losers" – the worthy ones of 2016 that, for whatever cockamamie reason, didn't even get a nomination.

In an effort to do right where the Academy effed up, I give you the Travers Awards – my own personal version of the Alt-Oscars. (For those of you playing along at home, the award is an engraved image of a critic screaming.) It's one last chance to single out the
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Joe Swanberg’s Filmmaking Factory: How the Diy Filmmaker Is Supporting a Community of Directors on the Rise

Joe Swanberg’s Filmmaking Factory: How the Diy Filmmaker Is Supporting a Community of Directors on the Rise
Joe Swanberg has been cranking out movies for over decade, and his micro-budget character studies quickly became the paradigm for the current state of American independent film. While Swanberg’s profile has grown — he recently launched the Netflix series “Easy” — he remains tethered to his roots, and now he’s expanding them: With the Chicago-based production company Forager Films, Swanberg has quietly launched an effort to support the work of other filmmakers operating on the same scale he embraced early on.

Read More: ‘Easy’ Review: Grading Every Episode of Joe Swanberg’s Profound New Netflix Series

The company, which Swanberg co-founded with Eddie Linker and Peter Gilbert, has churned out a series of diverse projects over the past year and a half: “Unexpected,” the sleeper Sundance hit directed by Swanberg’s wife Kris, follows an inner-city high school teacher who bonds with one of her students when they both get
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Lace Crater’ Exclusive Trailer: Joe Swanberg-Produced Supernatural Comedy-Drama About Ghostly STDs

‘Lace Crater’ Exclusive Trailer: Joe Swanberg-Produced Supernatural Comedy-Drama About Ghostly STDs
Lace Crater” follows twenty-something Ruth (Lindsay Burdge) who’s just getting over a breakup as she and her friends head to the Hamptons for a weekend of mild debauchery at their friend Andrew’s parents’ summer home. With all the bedrooms in the main house taken, Ruth agrees to sleep in the guest house that is supposedly haunted. One night while everyone is having a good time, Ruth stumbles to her bed and ends up encountering a mysterious figure – a burlap sack-wearing, light-sensitive otherworldly entity, Michael (Peter Vack). Ruth and Michael have a one-night stand, but when she returns home, she develop a ghostly Std, with symptoms that include frequent vomiting, light sensitivity, and spewing black ooze. When her friends all but abandon her, she’s left in isolation to deal with her problems and must decide on her own whether she wants to return to normal society. The film
See full article at Indiewire »

Nashville Film Showcase Aims to Be a ‘Destination Festival’

Nashville Film Showcase Aims to Be a ‘Destination Festival’
Throw a dart at a map of the U.S. and it’s fairly certain you’ll land on a city that hosts a film festival. And if less-established festivals can’t take credit for introducing critically acclaimed works into the marketplace a la Telluride, Sundance and SXSW, many of them can be credited for being well-attended, attracting top-shelf talent and being a regional platform for smaller films that might not otherwise see the light of day. One such event is the Nashville Film Festival, originally established in 1969 and running April 14-23 this year.

The city has always been known as the world capital of country music — a genre with a more conspicuous presence than ever in the pop charts, not to mention Grammy’s top categories. But its role as a cultural hub has extended beyond country to pop, the fine arts and cuisine. Celebs such as Nicole Kidman,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Joe Swanberg Anthology Comedy Easy Plucks Starry Ensemble Ahead Of Netflix Debut

Hannah Takes the Stairs and Uncle Kent director Joe Swanberg’s has assembled a star-studded lineup for Easy, a new anthology series headed to Netflix.

Toplining the casting bill are Orlando Bloom, Malin Akerman, Michael Chernus, Marc Maron, Elizabeth Reaser, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Jake Johnson, Aya Cash, Dave Franco, Jane Adams and Hannibal Burress – who recently joined the ranks of Paramount’s Baywatch opposite Dwayne Johnson and Zac Efron.

Written, directed and executive produced by Swanberg, the indie drama represents a passion project for the creator, and retains elements – albeit slack elements – of mumblecore filmmaking. That is, in essence, a creative process that favors low-key techniques and improvised dialog in order to nurture a lax and ultimately more believable viewing experience. Lena Dunham, the Duplass brothers and Lynn Shelton are among the few creators that still employ such a technique.

As for the general setup of Easy, Netflix’s new series
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Mumblecore Master Joe Swanberg Sets Star-Studded Comedic Anthology Series at Netflix

Mumblecore Master Joe Swanberg Sets Star-Studded Comedic Anthology Series at Netflix
"Mumblecore" master Joe Swanberg is headed for Netflix. The filmmaker behind micro-indie films including Kissing on the Mouth, Hannah Takes the Stairs and Uncle Kent has scored an eight-episode, straight-to-series order for comedy Easy. The half-hour single-camera comedy series will, in mumblecore fashion, write, direct and exec produce the series. Easy is described as an anthology that explores diverse Chicago characters as they fumble through the modern maze of love, sex, technology and culture.  The series will feature appearances from Orlando Bloom, Malin Akerman, Michael Chernus, Marc Maron, Elizabeth Reaser, Gugu Mbatha-Raw,

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Sex with ghosts leads to terrifying consequences in the bizarre 'Lace Crater' trailer

  • Hitfix
Sex with ghosts leads to terrifying consequences in the bizarre 'Lace Crater' trailer
"Lace Crater," a film that premiered on Tuesday at the Toronto International Film Festival, is being billed as a horror-comedy, but I don't see the "comedy" part of that equation in the film's new teaser, which teases the story of an awkward young woman (Lindsay Burge) who gets a sexually transmitted disease from a ghost. That's right: this woman has sex with a ghost and suffers the consequences. And you thought your twenties were hard! We can all learn a terrifying lesson from this. "Lace Crater" is the feature directorial debut of writer/director Harrison Atkins and was produced by mumblecore icon Joe Swanberg ("Hannah Takes the Stairs," "Happy Christmas"). Watch the teaser above and below.
See full article at Hitfix »

Review: Joe Swanberg's Excellent 'Digging For Fire' Marks a New Stage of His Career

Review: Joe Swanberg's Excellent 'Digging For Fire' Marks a New Stage of His Career
[Editor's Note: This post is presented in partnership with Time Warner Cable Movies On Demand in support of Indie Film Month. Today's pick, "Digging for Fire," is available now On Demand. Need help finding a movie to watch? Let TWC find the best fit for your mood here.] Read More: Rosemarie DeWitt on How Joe Swanberg's 'Digging for Fire' Reflected Her Own Life Experience The unearthing of a rusty gun and dirty bone from a backyard bank seems like a surface setup to a murder mystery, but as the latest entry in Joe Swanberg's oeuvre, "Digging for Fire" has an ulterior motive. Swanberg has always explored relationship dynamics in his films, from long-distance challenges ("Lol," "Nights and Weekends") to ambiguous workplace romances ("Hannah Takes the Stairs," "Drinking Buddies"), but none of his films have been as symbolically meaningful or emotionally mature as this one. "Digging"...
See full article at Indiewire »
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