Bamako (2006) - News Poster

(2006)

News

Berlinale 2017. Look Inside Yourself: Talking to Sompot Chidgasornpongse about "Railway Sleepers"

  • MUBI
As a critic, especially if you cover the festival circuit, befriending filmmakers is both a pleasant matter of course and a recurring cause for minor ethical quandaries. When they release a new film, do you avoid writing about it? And if not, will you be able to remain critical even if you dislike it, potentially severing a friendship?It’s therefore with some trepidation that I approached Railway Sleepers by Sompot Chidgasornpongse, whom I’d met in 2014 on the set of Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Cemetery of Splendour, where he was the 1st Assistant Director (since starting out as an intern on The Adventure of Iron Pussy, Sompot has worked on the majority of Apichatpong’s films). He first told me about his film on the ride back from the shoot one day, during a discussion about the Dardennes’ Two Days, One Night. He wanted to see the Dardennes’ film to
See full article at MUBI »

Abderrahmane Sissako Talks to Al Jazeera in Comprehensive Interview on Artistic Vision, Religion, Africa's Future & More

  • ShadowAndAct
Abderrahmane Sissako has a knack for taking weighty issues and saturating them with the every-day lives of a city’s ordinary people and, in the process, making the stories play out like vibrant, visually luscious soap operas. In his first feature film, "Bamako," Sissako looked at European/Western colonialism, capitalist neo-imperialism and their effects on Africa. The West, as represented by the Imf and World Bank, goes on trial in the courtyard of a humble compound in Mali’s capital city. In "Timbuktu," Sissako moves the action about 620 miles north-east, to the ancient city of learning and trade, to look at another form of cultural and ideological invasion, this time...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Say What You Will About the Academy - But Some Cool International Names Among 2015 New Member Invitees

Academy invitee Eddie Redmayne in 'The Theory of Everything.' Academy invites 322 new members: 'More diverse and inclusive list of filmmakers and artists than ever before' The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has offered membership to 322 individuals "who have distinguished themselves by their contributions to theatrical motion pictures." According to the Academy's press release, "those who accept the invitations will be the only additions to the Academy's membership in 2015." In case all 322 potential new members say an enthusiastic Yes, that means an injection of new blood representing about 5 percent of the Academy's current membership. In the words of Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs (as quoted in the press release), in 2015 "our branches have recognized a more diverse and inclusive list of filmmakers and artists than ever before, and we look forward to adding their creativity, ideas and experience to our organization." In recent years, the Academy membership has
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Oscar News: 322 Invited To Join; The Academy Museum Receives Approval

©Renzo Piano Building Workshop/©Studio Pali Fekete architects/©A.M.P.A.S.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced this week that the Los Angeles City Council, in a unanimous vote, approved plans for the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Construction will begin this summer, and ceremonial groundbreaking festivities will occur this fall.

“I am thrilled that Los Angeles is gaining another architectural and cultural icon,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti. “My office of economic development has worked directly with the museum’s development team to ensure that the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures will create jobs, support tourism, and pay homage to the industry that helped define our identity as the creative capital of the world.”

“We are grateful to our incredible community of supporters who have helped make this museum a reality,” said Dawn Hudson, the Academy’s CEO. “Building this museum has been an Academy
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Benedict Cumberbatch, Kevin Hart, Emma Stone and 319 others invited to vote for Oscar

  • Hitfix
Benedict Cumberbatch, Kevin Hart, Emma Stone and 319 others invited to vote for Oscar
Strangely dropping a press release on a historic day where the nation's attention is elsewhere, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences revealed their annual list of new member invitees this morning. For those who criticize the makeup of the Academy there was some good news and the stark realization the organization still has a long way to go. The Academy has spent the last eight to 10 years attempting to diversify its membership and this year's class mostly reflects that. There are significantly more invitees of Asian and African-American descent, but the male to female disparity is still depressing. Out of the 25 potential new members of the Actor's Branch only seven are women. And, no, there isn't really an acceptable way for the Academy to spin that sad fact. Additionally, It's important to realize the 322 people noted in the release have only been invited to join Hollywood's most exclusive club.
See full article at Hitfix »

Academy Invites Record 322 New Members in Push for More Oscar Diversity

Academy Invites Record 322 New Members in Push for More Oscar Diversity
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences continues to push for diversity, sending membership invitations to 322 individuals, including a healthy number of people who can help change the org’s demos.

Among the invitees are David Oyelowo, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Felicity Jones, Emma Stone, Rosamund Pike, Bong Joon-ho, Justin Lin and Francois Ozon. The Academy has been reaching out to women, foreign-born artists and people of various races, ethnic backgrounds and ages.

Accusations of Academy bigotry surfaced yet again in January when the list of Oscar nominees included Caucasians in all 20 acting categories, and few women or racial minorities among the other categories. Director Ava DuVernay and actor David Oyelowo of “Selma” had seemed like strong contenders, giving many people hopes of breakthroughs. After initial anger at the Acad, activists began to shift their protests to industry hiring practices. For example, 323 films were eligible for 2014 awards — which means AMPAS should theoretically
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: ‘Our House’

Film Review: ‘Our House’
Profound reserves of feeling don’t translate to deep audience impact in “Our House (O Ka),” a microcosmic documentary examination of Malian social injustice that reps a noble disappointment from esteemed veteran Souleymane Cisse. Framing a bitter property dispute over his Bamako family home as a piqued metaphor for the ongoing damage wrought by the Northern Mali conflict, Cisse’s film first registers as an intimate cri de coeur — aided by the charismatic presence of his four elderly sisters as the house’s embattled residents — before floundering in repetitive, overblown political rhetoric. A slot in the Special Screenings sidebar at Cannes will lead to further festival bookings, but its hectoring tone and downbeat subject matter will discourage arthouse distribs from giving “O Ka” the Ok.

Cisse’s film isn’t the first to tackle the devastating effects of the recent Islamist insurgency in his country, nor is it the most
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Abderrahmane Sissako Set to Preside Cannes’ Cinefondation and Short Film Jury

Abderrahmane Sissako Set to Preside Cannes’ Cinefondation and Short Film Jury
Paris– Abderrahmane Sissako, whose latest film “Timbuktu” played in competition at Cannes last year and nommed for a foreign-language Oscar, is set to return to the croisette to preside the Cinfondation and Short Films jury.

Sissako will follow in the footsteps of Abbas Kiarostami, Jane Campion, Michel Gondry, Hou Hsiao-hsien and Martin Scorsese, who previously served as president of that jury.

From “The Game,” to “Bamako” and “Timbuktu,” Sissako’s films explore with humanism the complex relations between North and South as well as the fate of Africa.

“I would never want to make a film that somebody else could make, and I want to see films that I would never make,” said the African director. “What’s important to me is the cinema of anonymity – addressing the conflicts but above all the suffering endured by anonymous people – empowering them and making them visible, testifying to their courage and their beauty.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes: Timbuktu director to head Cinéfondation, Shorts jury

  • ScreenDaily
Cannes: Timbuktu director to head Cinéfondation, Shorts jury
Oscar-nominated Abderrahmane Sissako named president of the Cinéfondation and Short Films Jury.

Abderrahmane Sissako, who was in competition at last year’s Cannes Film Festival with Timbuktu, is to return for the 68th edition of the festival (May 13-24) as the president of the Cinéfondation and Short Films Jury.

The African filmmaker follows directors including Abbas Kiarostami, Jane Campion, Michel Gondry, Hou Hsiao-hsien and Martin Scorsese.

Born in Mauritania but brought up in Mali and trained in filmmaking in the Soviet Union – at the Moscow Vgik – Sissako’s films explore the complex relations between North and South of Africa.

The Game, directed by Sissako during his final year at film school, was presented at Cannes Critics’ Week in 1991, followed two years later by the medium-length Octobre, at Un Certain Regard.

Life on Earth and Waiting for Happiness, both featured in Cannes Directors’ Fortnight in 1998 and Un Certain Regard in 2002.

Bamako, a political
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Review: Religion Unites With Hypocrisy in Abderrahmane Sissako's 'Timbuktu' (Opens Wednesday)

  • ShadowAndAct
Cohen Media Group opens the film theatrically, starting this Wednesday, January 28, 2015. Check your local listings Abderrahmane Sissako has a knack for taking weighty issues and saturating them with the every-day lives of a city’s ordinary people and, in the process, making the stories play out like vibrant, visually luscious soap operas. In his first feature film, "Bamako," Sissako looked at European/Western colonialism, capitalist neo-imperialism and their effects on Africa. The West, as represented by the Imf and World Bank, goes on trial in the courtyard of a humble compound in Mali’s capital city. In "Timbuktu," Sissako moves the action about 620 miles north-east,...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

“I Can Make This Happen”: Danny Glover on Producing

Danny Glover is one of America’s most beloved actors, but few know about his equally impressive accomplishments as a producer. He’s served as executive producer on multiple films to help see them through to completion, and with Joslyn Barnes he created his own company, Louverture Films, in order to give voice to underrepresented filmmakers. Their first project, Abderrahmane Sissako’s award-winning 2006 Bamako, was followed by an incredibly rich slate of films, including Tia Lessin and Carl Deal’s Trouble the Water, Eugene Jarecki’s The House I Live In, and Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Palme d’Or winner Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. They recently released […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Foreign Language Oscar Shortlist: A Preview Of Possibilities, Part 3

  • Deadline
Here’s the final entry in my annual assessment of movies that have a chance to pass the first stage of the Foreign Language Oscar race. We expect the shortlist to come out tomorrow and I’m expecting a number of the films I’ve profiled below, and here and here, will make the grade. I spoke with the directors of the films about their inspirations and expectations and I also checked in with the U.S. distributors about why they bought the movies. Below is a look at the final five titles that have generated serious buzz over the past several weeks of screenings, Q&As and consulate lunches (and there are also a handful of special mentions). The films are in no particular order:

Wild Tales (Argentina), U.S. Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics

A runaway success at home in Argentina, Wild Tales is director Damián Szifrón’s third feature.
See full article at Deadline »

Sissako’s Foreign-Language Oscar Hopeful ‘Timbuktu’ Enthralls French Auds

Sissako’s Foreign-Language Oscar Hopeful ‘Timbuktu’ Enthralls French Auds
Marrakech — Abderrahmane Sissako’s “Timbuktu,” Mauritania’s first ever foreign-language Oscar candidate, is a smash at the French box office, grossing over 109,000 Euros ($135,000) on opening day.

The movie, which world premiered in competition at Cannes and earned unanimously upbeat reviews, was released by Jean Labadie’s Le Pacte on Wednesday across 150 French screens and sold 17,394 admissions in a single day.

It’s not only the best B.O. performance ever achieved by a Sissako movie, it’s also one of the highest-grossing openings for a world-cinema title in recent years, pointed out Camille Neel, head of international sales at Le Pacte.

Sissako’s follow-up to “Bamako,” “Timbuktu” has so far outperformed recent arthouse hits such as Asghar Farhadi’s Oscar-winning “A Separation” and “The Past,” Ari Folman’s foreign-language Oscar contender “Waltz With Bashir,” Pawel Pawlikowski’s Golden-Globe nominated “Ida” and Haifaa Al-Mansour’s BAFTA-nommed “Wajda.”

Produced by Sylvie Pialat’s Les Films du Worso,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Watch In-Depth 30-Minute Conversation with Abderrahmane Sissako on His Lauded Drama 'Timbuktu'

  • ShadowAndAct
Abderrahmane Sissako has a knack for taking weighty issues and saturating them with the every-day lives of a city’s ordinary people and, in the process, making the stories play out like vibrant, visually luscious soap operas. In his first feature film, "Bamako," Sissako looked at European/Western colonialism, capitalist neo-imperialism and their effects on Africa. The West, as represented by the Imf and World Bank, goes on trial in the courtyard of a humble compound in Mali’s capital city. In "Timbuktu," Sissako moves the action about 620 miles north-east, to the ancient city of learning and trade, to look at another form of cultural and ideological invasion, this time...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

AFI Fest Review: Religion Unites With Hypocrisy in Abderrahmane Sissako's 'Timbuktu'

  • ShadowAndAct
Abderrahmane Sissako has a knack for taking weighty issues and saturating them with the every-day lives of a city’s ordinary people and, in the process, making the stories play out like vibrant, visually luscious soap operas. In his first feature film, "Bamako," Sissako looked at European/Western colonialism, capitalist neo-imperialism and their effects on Africa. The West, as represented by the Imf and World Bank, goes on trial in the courtyard of a humble compound in Mali’s capital city. In "Timbuktu," Sissako moves the action about 620 miles north-east, to the ancient city of learning and trade, to look at another form of cultural and ideological invasion, this time...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

London Film Festival Review: Religion Unites With Hypocrisy in Abderrahmane Sissako's 'Timbuktu'

  • ShadowAndAct
Abderrahmane Sissako has a knack for taking weighty issues and saturating them with the every-day lives of a city’s ordinary people and, in the process, making the stories play out like vibrant, visually luscious soap operas. In his first feature film, "Bamako," Sissako looked at European/Western colonialism, capitalist neo-imperialism and their effects on Africa. The West, as represented by the Imf and World Bank, goes on trial in the courtyard of a humble compound in Mali’s capital city. In "Timbuktu," Sissako moves the action about 620 miles north-east, to the ancient city of learning and trade, to look at another form of cultural and ideological invasion, this time...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Daily | Nyff 2014 | Abderrahmane Sissako’s Timbuktu

  • Keyframe
Timbuktu, Abderrahmane Sissako's "first feature since 2007’s Bamako is a fleet, forceful response to the brief but traumatic few months in 2013 when foreign jihadists seized control of the northern Malian city and imposed Sharia law," writes Tom Charity in Cinema Scope. At the Av Club, Ignatiy Vishnevetsky notes that Sissako's "central point—that the militants are unreasonable, capricious, and cruel—is hardly new, but it’s bolstered by the fact that he frames his argument using a community of religious Muslims." At Filmmaker, Howard Feinstein adds that Sissako is "well served by Dp Sofiane El Fani, who captures the desert’s peculiar emptiness all the way through with brilliant use of widescreen." » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

‘Fury’, ‘Foxcatcher’, ‘Mr. Turner’ headline BFI 58th London Film Festival 2014

Fury (David Ayer)

[via the BFI]

The programme for the 58th BFI London Film Festival launched today, with Festival Director Clare Stewart presenting this year’s rich and diverse selection of films and events. The lineup includes highly anticipated fall titles including David Ayer’s Fury, Bennett Miller’s Foxcatcher, the Sundance smash Whiplash, Jean-Luc Godard’s Goodbye to Language 3D, The Imitation Game starring Benedict Cumberbatch, Mike Leigh’s Mr. Turner, Jason Reitman’s Men, Women and Children and Jean-Marc Vallee’s Wild.

As Britain’s leading film event and one of the world’s oldest film festivals, it introduces the finest new British and international films to an expanding London and UK-wide audience, offering a compelling combination of red carpet glamour, engaged audiences and vibrant exchange. The Festival provides an essential profiling opportunity for films seeking global success at the start of the Awards season, promotes the careers of British and
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Review: Mood Indigo

  • Slackerwood
If one can expect anything from Michel Gondry, it is that along with the whimsy and touch of the bizarre inherent in his work is an element of truth.  Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind uses erasure imagery to illustrate the pain of heartbreak. Be Kind Rewind has friendly video store employees creating their own versions of Hollywood hits for their neighborhood.  Gondry's latest film, love story Mood Indigo, however, is utterly drowning in whimsy and lacking any figment of truth.

Debonair and bearded Romain Duris (Populaire, The Beat That My Heart Skipped) stars as Colin, living off family money in a spacious Paris apartment. Audrey Tautou (Amelie, A Very Long Engagement) plays cute Chloe, whom Colin meets at a party. The plot goes something like this: guy meets girl, guy and girl fall in love and marry, flower grows in girl's lung.

There's also a B-plot, involving a friend (Gad Elmaleh,
See full article at Slackerwood »

Le Pacte seals Timbuktu deals

Le Pacte seals Timbuktu deals
Exclusive: Film inspired by real-life stoning of young Mali couple draws buyers.

Paris-based Le Pacte has secured a slew of deals on Abderrahmane Sissako’s competition title Timbuktu capturing the reign of terror of Islamic fundamentalists in Northern Mali.

The company has sold the film to Benelux (Cineart), Switzerland (Trigon), Italy (Academy Two), Spain (Golem), Portugal (Midas), Greece (Weird Wave), Canada (Axia), Sweden (Folkets Bio), Norway (As Fidalgo), Brazil (Imovision) and ex-Yugoslavia (McF).

Le Pacte will distribute the film in France.

“Le Pacte is really proud to work with all these distributors who fell in love as we did with Timbuktu,” said sales company chief Camille Neel.

Set against the backdrop of a small town just outside of Timbuktu, the film is inspired the real-life stoning to death of a couple accused of having children out of marriage in 2012.

It is co-produced by Les Films du Worso and Orange Studio.

Sissako was last
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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