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2018 Oscars: ‘Blade Runner 2049’ would be the first cinematography champ to defeat a Best Picture-nominated film in 12 years

After wins this weekend at the American Society of Cinematographers and BAFTA, “Blade Runner 2049” appears to be well-positioned for the Oscars. Nothing is a sure thing with hard-luck 13-time loser Roger Deakins, but if he pulls this out, this would be the first time in 12 years that a non-Best Picture nominee beat a Best Picture nominee for Best Cinematography.

The last film to do this was “Memoirs of a Geisha” (2005), which edged out Best Picture nominees “Brokeback Mountain” and “Good Night, and Good Luck,” and non-Best Picture contenders “Batman Begins” and “The New World.” The following year’s Best Cinematography field was comprised entirely of non-Best Picture nominees — “Pan’s Labyrinth” beat “The Black Dahlia,” “Children of Men,” “The Illusionist” and “The Prestige” — so that is the last time a non-Best Picture nominee won the category. Since then, every cinematography champ has vied for the top award.

See 2018 BAFTA
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Thy Kingdom Come’ Trailer: Surprise Terrence Malick Spinoff Film Focuses on Javier Bardem’s Priest From ‘To The Wonder’

‘Thy Kingdom Come’ Trailer: Surprise Terrence Malick Spinoff Film Focuses on Javier Bardem’s Priest From ‘To The Wonder’
Terrence Malick is one of the most notorious filmmakers when it comes to cutting footage. Not even being a household name guarantees you a spot in the final edit of a Malick movie (just ask Adrien Brody, Viggo Mortensen, and more). The director’s 2012 drama “To The Wonder” stars Javier Bardem in the brief role of a conflicted priest. The theatrical cut of the film features Bardem more in voiceover as his character meditates on the nature of faith and love, but it turns out that a lot more footage of the actor was shot that never saw the light of day. Until now.

One of the films world premiering at the upcoming South by Southwest Film Festival next month is “Thy Kingdom Come,” which has been revealed as a surprise spinoff of “To The Wonder.” The 43-minute film features Bardem’s priest as he interviews different Oklahoma natives about what is troubling them most.
See full article at Indiewire »

Terrence Malick’s ‘To the Wonder’ Gets Expanded in First Trailer for ‘Thy Kingdom Come’

Considering how much footage is shot when it comes to the films of Terrence Malick, we often see varying editions (The New World) and versions (Voyage of Time), not to mention the numerous actors whose characters are completely cut out of the film. It was only a matter of time before an entirely different film was made of the unused footage, and now that’s the case when it comes to extra materials left in the editing bay from To the Wonder.

Back in 2010, photojournalist Eugene Richards was hired by Malick to venture into the town Bartlesville, Oklahoma with Javier Bardem as his priest character. Over the course of the shoot, they spoke to the townspeople, ranging from a former Ku Klux Klan leader to a woman who recounted her stories of sexual assault. While some of this was seen in the final film, of course, there was mountains of it left over.
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Baby Driver’ could win all three of its Oscar races like ‘The Bourne Ultimatum’ did 10 years ago

‘Baby Driver’ could win all three of its Oscar races like ‘The Bourne Ultimatum’ did 10 years ago
“Baby Driver” is riding in second place behind “Dunkirk” in all three of its Oscar races — Best Editing, Best Sound Editing and Best Sound Mixing — in our combined odds. But Christopher Nolan‘s World War II epic should keep an eye on the rearview mirror because “Baby Driver” could very well speed past it all the way to the Kodak Theatre stage.

“Baby Driver” needs only to look to “The Bourne Ultimatum” (2007) for inspiration. The third installment of Matt Damon‘s spy franchise went three-for-three in the exact same categories the Edgar Wright flick is up for. War films have historically ruled these categories, but every now and then, the Oscars go all in on popular action films that aren’t Best Picture contenders but are brimming with sharp cutting and audio work that amp up the intensity. “The Matrix” also won these categories, along with Best Visual Effects, 18 years ago.
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 BAFTAs: Roger Deakins (‘Blade Runner 2049’) would tie Emmanuel Lubezki with four cinematography wins

2018 BAFTAs: Roger Deakins (‘Blade Runner 2049’) would tie Emmanuel Lubezki with four cinematography wins
Roger Deakins is still missing an Oscar from his resume, but he’s got plenty of BAFTA Awards — so many that if the “Blade Runner 2049” cinematographer prevails Sunday, he’ll join Emmanuel Lubezki with the second-most wins in the category at four behind Geoffrey Unsworth’s five.

In our latest predictions, Deakins has 8/15 odds to win over “Dunkirk” (3/1 odds), “The Shape of Water” (14/1 odds), “Darkest Hour” (66/1 odds) and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (100/1 odds). An eight-time nominee, Deakins took home BAFTAs for lensing “The Man Who Wasn’t There” (2001), “No Country for Old Men” (2007) and “True Grit” (2010).

See ‘Blade Runner 2049’ could win Best Cinematography at the Oscars, but that Best Director snub really hurts

Deakins lost his most recent nomination, for 2015’s “Sicario,” to Lubezki — the first time the renowned cinematographers faced off at the BAFTAs — who won his third straight BAFTA for “The Revenant.” A previous winner
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars 2018: 10 Nominees Long Overdue for a Win

Oscars 2018: 10 Nominees Long Overdue for a Win
Back in 1982, Randy Newman picked up his first two Oscar nominations, for an original song and score for the movie Ragtime. Twenty years – and over a dozen more noms – later, Newman eventually brought home an Academy Award, for the Monsters, Inc. tune "If I Didn't Have You." The statuette, you could argue, was way, way overdue. (How did he not win for The Natural score? Or for "You've Got a Friend in Me," for Zurg's sake?)

That's just one example among many: Remember when living-legend Ennio Morricone won his first
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Will ‘Get Out’ and ‘Call Me by Your Name’ replicate their WGA wins at the Oscars?

Will ‘Get Out’ and ‘Call Me by Your Name’ replicate their WGA wins at the Oscars?
Get Out” got a huge Oscar boost by winning Best Original Screenplay at Sunday’s Writers Guild Awards, while “Call Me by Your Name” picked up Best Adapted Screenplay as expected. Now they will try to replicate their victories at the Oscars, which has matched both WGA winners 12 times since WGA standardized its categories 33 years ago.

More than any other guild, there are a lot of asterisks when it comes to WGA champs and comparisons with Oscar. There have been a number of eventual screenplay Oscar winners who were ineligible at WGA, including four this century: 2010’s “The King’s Speech (Best Original Screenplay), 2012’s “Django Unchained” (Best Original Screenplay), 2013’s “12 Years a Slave” (Best Adapted Screenplay) and 2014’s “Birdman” (Best Original Screenplay). This year, of course, Martin McDonagh’s original script “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” was ineligible.

See Writers Guild Awards winners: ‘Call Me by Your Name
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 USC Scripter Awards: ‘Call Me By Your Name’ wins on way to Oscars

2018 USC Scripter Awards: ‘Call Me By Your Name’ wins on way to Oscars
The USC Scripter Award, now in its 30th year, honors films adapted from novels, short stories, comic books, journalism, and other screenplays with both the source material and the adapted screenplay feted. This year’s winner was “Call Me By Your Name,” which prevailed over four of its Oscar four of its rivals for Best Adapted Screenplay at the Oscars — “The Disaster Artist,” “Logan,” “Molly’s Game” and “Mudbound — as well as the “The Lost City of Z” and “Wonder Woman.”

As it excludes stage-to-screen adaptations and foreign-language films, the Scripter has forecast just 13 of the eventual Oscar winners for Best Adapted Screenplay, but nine of those were in the past decade: “Moonlight” (2016), “The Big Short” (2015) “The Imitation Game,” (2014), “12 Years a Slave” (2013), “Argo” (2012), “The Descendants” (2011), “The Social Network” (2010), “Slumdog Millionaire” (2008), and “No Country for Old Men” (2007). The other repeat winners were “A Beautiful Mind” (2001), “L.A. Confidential” (1997), “Sense and Sensibility
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars 2018: Guillermo del Toro (‘The Shape of Water’) or Jordan Peele (‘Get Out’) would be 8th winner for writing, directing, And producing

Oscars 2018: Guillermo del Toro (‘The Shape of Water’) or Jordan Peele (‘Get Out’) would be 8th winner for writing, directing, And producing
Guillermo del Toro (“The Shape of Water”) and Jordan Peele (“Get Out”) joined an elite group of filmmakers who received Oscar nominations for writing, directing and producing the same film. In the academy’s 90-year history, only 26 other people pulled off this hat trick. Peele is the first black filmmaker to do so, while del Toro is only the second Latin American after his filmmaking amigo Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu.

Now del Toro and Peele are hoping to join the even more exclusive club of seven filmmakers who won all three prizes in one night. Considering they’re in direct competition with each other for Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Original Screenplay (where del Toro competes alongside co-writer Vanessa Taylor), it’ll be an especially tricky feat to pull off.

Leo McCarey was the first person to win the big three for “Going My Way” (1944), a lighthearted comedy starring Bing
See full article at Gold Derby »

Woody Harrelson movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Three Billboards,’ ‘Zombieland,’ ‘The Hunger Games’

  • Gold Derby
Woody Harrelson movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Three Billboards,’ ‘Zombieland,’ ‘The Hunger Games’
Woody Harrelson received his third Oscar nomination for his work in the 2017 film “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri” starring Frances McDormand. The highly acclaimed performance continues a 30-year career that has brought the actor acclaim for both his comedic and dramatic work.

Harrelson started his career on the Broadway stage as an understudy in the hit Neil Simon play “Biloxi Blues.” Just months after that play opened Harrelson would become a household name when he started playing the role of Woody Boyd in the fourth season of the highly successful sitcom “Cheers.” Harrelson faced a daunting assignment when he joined the show since he was replacing the popular Nicholas Colasanto who played Coach on the first three seasons but sadly passed away during the show’s run. Harrelson clicked with the cast and audience and went on to receive five Emmy nominations for “Cheers” and won the 1989 Best Comedy Supporting
See full article at Gold Derby »

Roger Deakins’ Record Shot at Oscar Glory

Roger Deakins’ Record Shot at Oscar Glory
With his Oscar nomination for Denis Villeneuve’s “Blade Runner 2049,” cinematographer Roger Deakins moved past legendary lenser George J. Folsey (“Executive Suite,” “Meet Me in St. Louis”) as the most-nominated director of photography in history to never win the gold (14 nominations and counting). Of course, the “Blade Runner” bid is still pending, so that status could finally change on March 4. But Deakins’ consistent presence on the circuit brings with it a persistent question: What will it take for one of the most celebrated artists in the industry to finally get his due on Hollywood’s biggest night?

For his part, Deakins isn’t the least bit fazed by his ongoing bad luck with the Academy. “Oh, you know, I’m too old for all of that,” he told Variety in a recent interview. “What you do doesn’t change. The fun is doing it.”

Fair enough, but for such an influential craftsman to have gone unrecognized
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Innovative Genre Movies Goose This Year’s Oscar Race

Innovative Genre Movies Goose This Year’s Oscar Race
Will this be one of those rare years when Oscar shows the lowly “genre” film a little love?

Undoubtedly, if only because so many of this year’s best-picture contenders come wrapped in indie-film credibility and are layered with contemporary sensibilities that elevate the films beyond the “genre” label.

Consider “Get Out,” which combines two particularly Oscar-averse genres — horror and comedy. Writer-director Jordan Peele blended them into an awards juggernaut that dives headfirst into one of the biggest hot-button issues of the day: race.

Before we go further, let’s define our terms: While the French word “genre” refers to a way of classifying or categorizing artistic works, the term “genre film” usually stands as a pejorative when thrown around by snobby critics while referring to Westerns, sci-fi films, sports tales, war stories and a few other categories. It’s a way of dismissing a film (“It’s a genre film”) — a fancier way of saying, “Well
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Weekend Watch: ‘Baby Driver’ Sound Design, Rodger Deakins Oscar Snubs, ‘Dunkirk’ & More

Welcome to Weekend Watch, where we highlight some of the best nerd-related videos released throughout the week. Whether it be short films, behind the scenes videos, video essays, the only requirement is that they are about–in some shape of form–our favorite movies and TV shows!

In this edition of Weekend Watch, we take a look at the intricate sound design of ‘Baby Driver‘, a saddening video chronicling all of the times that Rodger Deakins has lost at the Oscars, and an in-depth video essay on how Christopher Nolan uses scale to make ‘Dunkirk‘ so successful. Plus, we take a look at a video of Tom Cruise detailing his ‘Mission: Impossible Fallout‘ injury, along with this year’s nearly hour-long THR Actor’s Roundtable that highlights some of this year’s awards contenders including Tom Hanks and Gary Oldman, among others.

Starting off, we have we have an awesome
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

Woody Harrelson movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Woody Harrelson movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Woody Harrelson received his third Oscar nomination for his work in the 2017 film “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri.” The highly acclaimed performance continues a 30-year career that has brought the actor acclaim for both his comedic and dramatic work.

Harrelson started his career on the Broadway stage as an understudy in the hit Neil Simon play “Biloxi Blues.” Just months after that play opened Harrelson would become a household name when he started playing the role of Woody Boyd in the fourth season of the highly successful sitcom “Cheers.” Harrelson faced a daunting assignment when he joined the show since he was replacing the popular Nicholas Colasanto who played Coach on the first three seasons but sadly passed away during the show’s run. Harrelson clicked with the cast and audience and went on to receive five Emmy nominations for “Cheers” and won the 1989 Best Comedy Supporting Actor award for
See full article at Gold Derby »

Revisiting Daniel Day-Lewis and Denzel Washington’s intertwined Oscar history

Revisiting Daniel Day-Lewis and Denzel Washington’s intertwined Oscar history
Daniel Day-Lewis (“Phantom Thread”) and Denzel Washington (“Roman J. Israsel, Esq.”) have a date at the Oscars — and it’s not their first. The Best Actor nominees, who’ve never starred in a film together, have a lot of shared Oscar history, going back to their big breakthroughs early in their careers. Half of the six nominations for Day-Lewis have overlapped with Washington, who’s on his eighth acting nomination (he has another one for producing Best Picture nominee “Fences” last year). But even when the two weren’t nominated simultaneously they still crossed paths somehow.

Day-Lewis and Washington both won their first Oscars on the same night 28 years ago — the former took Best Actor for his portrayal of Christy Brown in “My Left Foot” (1989) and the latter won Best Supporting Actor for playing runaway slave soldier Pvt. Tripp in “Glory” (1989). They both returned the following year to present Best
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: Will ‘Three Billboards’ be the first Best Picture champ without a director or screenplay win in 15 years?

2018 Oscars: Will ‘Three Billboards’ be the first Best Picture champ without a director or screenplay win in 15 years?
Martin McDonagh’s omission from the Best Director final five was a big blow to “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” as it now tries to become just the fifth film to win the Best Picture Oscar without a directing nomination. But that may not be the only stat it has to defy: “Three Billboards” could also be the first film in 15 years to snag the main award without a directing or screenplay win.

Only 10 other films have done this. They are:

1. “Wings” (1927/28)

2. “The Broadway Melody” (1928/29)

3. “Grand Hotel” (1931/32)

4. “Mutiny on the Bounty” (1935)

5. “The Great Ziegfeld” (1936)

6. “Rebecca” (1940)

7. “Hamlet” (1948)

8. “All the King’s Men” (1949)

9. “Gladiator” (2000)

10. “Chicago” (2002)

(1952 Best Picture champ “The Greatest Show on Earth” could also be included in this list — it won the now-defunct Oscar for Best Story, which didn’t award the actual script and co-existed with Best Original Screenplay until it was dissolved after the 1956 season.)

Directing and screenplay understandably
See full article at Gold Derby »

In Praise of Frances McDormand

Tom Jolliffe celebrates the career of Frances McDormand

I have a number of favourite actors. If I had carte-blanche to cast a film it would probably be filled up with characters. Maybe brilliant underachievers, who never quite hit their heights for one reason or another (Mickey Rourke, Eric Roberts, Rutger Hauer), or maybe they just died before their time like John Cazale. It’s those chameleons that I find most engaging though, those who are occasionally a lead, but often find themselves as second billing (if that). People like John Goodman.

I’m staunchly proud of a lot of our finer British talents too, like Helen Mirren, a national treasure. So yes, we’re establishing here a pattern and whilst I can always sit and watch Meryl Streep or Tom Hanks, or the ‘leads’ doing their thing, I’ve always liked the character artists. One of those legends who, no
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Oscars flashback: Joel and Ethan Coen win Best Picture for ‘No Country for Old Men’ 10 years ago [Watch]

Oscars flashback: Joel and Ethan Coen win Best Picture for ‘No Country for Old Men’ 10 years ago [Watch]
Producer Scott Rudin made one of the greatest decisions of his life when he approached Joel and Ethan Coen about directing a project for him in 2005. He had purchased the film rights to “No Country for Old Men,” a new novel by Cormac McCarthy about a drug deal gone wrong on the United States/Mexico border in the 1980s. But they were hesitant to accept since they were known for writing their own original movies, including an Oscar victory for the screenplay of Fargo” in 1996.

See Oscar Best Picture Gallery: History of Every Academy Award-Winning Movie

The finished film brought them back to the Academy Awards 10 years ago and became the Best Picture of 2007 at the ceremony in 2008 (watch the video above). They would also take home trophies for Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay that evening. With this triumph the Coen brothers joined James Cameron as the most recent
See full article at Gold Derby »

Paul Thomas Anderson (‘Phantom Thread’) earns 7th & 8th Oscar nominations on 20th anniversary of his 1st for ‘Boogie Nights’

Paul Thomas Anderson (‘Phantom Thread’) earns 7th & 8th Oscar nominations on 20th anniversary of his 1st for ‘Boogie Nights’
Paul Thomas Anderson earned a pair of Oscar nominations this year for Best Picture and Best Director for the romantic drama “Phantom Thread.” It might have been as surprising to him as it was to us Oscar pundits, who didn’t see those nominations coming. And it was an even more meaningful honor for the filmmaker considering it came exactly 20 years after his first academy bid for “Boogie Nights” (1997).

Anderson contended in Best Original Screenplay for that film, a sprawling chronicle of one man’s (Mark Walhberg) adventures in the California adult film world of the late 1970s and 1980s — like Robert Altman‘s “Nashville” for the porn industry. The film reaped additional bids for supporting players Burt Reynolds and Julianne Moore, who lost to Robin Williams (“Good Will Hunting”) and Kim Basinger (“L.A. Confidential”), respectively. Anderson lost his category to “Hunting” scribes Ben Affleck and Matt Damon.

See Watch out Gary Oldman!
See full article at Gold Derby »

Sony Classics Lines Up Worldwide Rights to Marc Turtletaub’s ‘Puzzle’ for $5 Million

  • The Wrap
Sony Pictures Classics has paid $5 million for world rights to director Marc Turtletaub’s debut feature “Puzzle,” a film set in the world of competitive jigsaw puzzling that debuted Tuesday at the Sundance Film Festival. Kelly Macdonald (“No Country for Old Men,” “Boardwalk Empire”) turns in a rare lead performance as a bored suburban housewife who discovers a passion for jigsaw puzzles that leads her to the world of competitions. Her character, Agnes, is soon swapping household chores for secretive train rides to New York City, where her mentor (Irrfan Khan) helps her unlock a desire to finally march to the...
See full article at The Wrap »
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