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Tilda Swinton Reteaming With Jim Jarmusch For New Film

When Tilda Swinton works with a director she likes, there’s a good chance she’ll wind up making another movie with them should the opportunity arise. One of the filmmakers on her Rolodex is Jim Jarmusch, with the pair previously collaborating on “Broken Flowers,” “The Limits Of Control,” and “Only Lovers Left Alive.” Now, it looks like she’s gearing up to re-team with the filmmaker once again.

Continue reading Tilda Swinton Reteaming With Jim Jarmusch For New Film at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Julie Delpy to Receive Honorary Tribute at 30th European Film Awards

Julie Delpy to Receive Honorary Tribute at 30th European Film Awards
Julie Delpy, the Oscar-nominated French-American writer, filmmaker and actress, will receive the European Achievement in World Cinema award at the 30th European Film Awards in December. The honor recognizes Delpy’s rich and diverse career in front of and behind the camera.

The Paris-born Delpy is best known for her role opposite Ethan Hawke in Richard Linklater’s “Before Sunrise” (1995), “Before Sunset” (2004) and “Before Midnight” (2013), which she co-wrote. Delpy received an Oscar nomination in screenwriting for “Before Sunset” and “Before Midnight” (shared with Linklater and Hawke) as well as a Golden Globe nomination for her performance in the latter.

A graduate of Nyu’s Tisch School of the Arts, Delpy has directed, written or acted in more than 30 films. She’s been nominated at the European Film Awards twice, first as an actress in Volker Schlöndorff’s “Homo Faber,” in 1991, and as a director in 2007 with “2 Days in Paris,” which also earned a Cesar nomination. Her
See full article at Variety - Film News »

After Soderbergh: See the Top 10 Box Office Track Records of Classic Indie Filmmakers

  • Indiewire
After Soderbergh: See the Top 10 Box Office Track Records of Classic Indie Filmmakers
In a career that began with “sex lies and videotape” in 1989, “Logan Lucky” is Steven Soderbergh’s 26th theatrical release. It will extend his record as the top-grossing American director to come out of the independent scene in its formative years — a period we’ll define as 1975 (Joan Micklin Silver’s “Hester Street”) through 1992 (Quentin Tarantino’s debut, “Reservoir Dogs”).

To be clear, Soderbergh’s an outlier; his billion-dollar box office dwarfs every other indie filmmaker. However, looking at the performance of his contemporaries who got their start in that indie film movement, you may be surprised at who’s on the list. (Note: “Outside wide release” means less than 1,000 screens. Also, the list doesn’t include directors like Sam Raimi and Abel Ferrara, who have independent roots but were not discovered via the film festival/arthouse pathway, or Alan Rudolph, another significant ’80s figure; he started in horror films in the early ’70s.
See full article at Indiewire »

AFI to honour cinematographer Frederick Elmes

  • ScreenDaily
AFI to honour cinematographer Frederick Elmes
1972 alumnus has worked with David Lynch, John Cassavetes, Ang Lee, Jim Jarmusch.

Cinematographer Frederick Elmes will receive the AFI’s 2017 Franklin J. Schaffner Alumni Medal.

The honour recognises the “extraordinary creative talents of an AFI alumnus or alumna who embodies the qualities of filmmaker Franklin J. Schaffner: talent, taste, dedication and commitment to quality storytelling in film and television.”

Elmes’s credits include Eraserhead, Blue Velvet, Wild At Heart, The Ice Storm, Broken Flowers, and River’s Edge, among others.

The presentation will take place at the AFI Life Achievement Award Gala Tribute to Diane Keaton in Hollywood on June 8.

Elmes collaborated with Keaton on her 1987 directorial debut Heaven and has earned a Primetime Emmy nomination, two Film Independent Spirit Awards and a New York Film Critics Circle Award, among other accolades.

Prior recipients of the Franklin J. Schaffner Alumni Medal include Lynch, Darren Aronofsky, Homeland director Lesli Link Glatter, Wonder Woman director
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Is Jeffrey Wright’s Voice as Awesome as Morgan Freeman’s?

I became a huge Jeffrey Wright fan the second I saw him in the film The Manchurian Candidate. While his role as a fallen soldier who was subjected to brain manipulation wasn’t a huge role, his character still had an impact on me. After that I saw him in Broken Flowers where again, he wasn’t the lead or had a tremendous part, but I just remembered him. Even in the movie Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close his part lasted all of five minutes but I can remember it as clear as day. The point I’m making is that Jeffrey Wright

Is Jeffrey Wright’s Voice as Awesome as Morgan Freeman’s?
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Julie Delpy, Christina Ricci to Be Honored at Vail Film Festival (Exclusive)

Julie Delpy, Christina Ricci to Be Honored at Vail Film Festival (Exclusive)
The Vail Film Festival has announced that it will celebrate women filmmakers, honoring Julie Delpy and Christina Ricci and opening with Susan Johnson’s coming-of-age story “Carrie Pilby,” Variety has learned exclusively.

The 14th annual festival will run from March 30 to April 2, closing with Amanda Sharp’s family drama “Sticky Notes,” which stars Rose Leslie as an emotionally detached backup dancer living in Los Angeles who returns to Florida to take care of her estranged father, played by Ray Liotta.

Julie Delpy will receive the Vail Film Festival Vanguard award in recognition of her having directed, written, or acted in more than 50 films. She wrote and starred in the Richard Linklater trilogy “Before Sunrise,” “Before Sunset” and “Before Midnight,” with co-writer and co-star Ethan Hawke, and received Oscar nominations for “Before Sunset” and “Before Midnight” for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Related

Julie Delpy: ‘I Don’t Want to Be in My Films Anymore,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: Gravity of Poetic Dreams Carry Weight in ‘Paterson’

Chicago – What is more ordinary than a man alone with his thoughts, and then applying those thoughts to paper in the form of poetry? “Paterson” is a celebration of such ritual, and other dreams in the working class. It never panders, it never makes the “hero” that heroic, but it does challenge him in an ordinary sense, to work it out as meaningful poetics.

Rating: 5.0/5.0

This is a quiet and low-keyed film, directed by independent icon Jim Jarmusch (“Broken Flowers”), but it resonates with the power of words and purpose. The main character is a bus driver, but his status in life is not determined by what he does, but how he lives. He is devoted to his wife, who also dreams – not of words, but in the ideal of finding her passion in life. This is a concise character study that fires on emotions and intellectual stimulation, not because
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Film Feature: The 10 Best Films of 2016, By Patrick McDonald

Chicago – It’s that time of the film year, the “Ten Best” lists. In representing my 2016 picks – as “Patrick McDonald” – I looked for the emotional experience as much as anything. I think every filmgoer, from the most casual to the ardent buff, adhere to their favorites through that feeling of connection.

There are honorable mentions all over the place, often just missing the 10th spot – I like to characterize them as all tied for eleventh. My favorite superhero film was “Captain America: Civil War,” for the Marvel Comics angst that works best in this genre of movies. The dramas “Arrival,” “Elle,” “Little Men” and “A Monster Calls” were excellent and heartfelt experiences. I loved the wacky tribute that writer/directors Joel and Ethan Coen gave to 1950s Hollywood in “Hail, Caesar!” And after watching it again after initial reservations, I realized and connected to the ardent celebration in the musical “La La Land.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

‘La La Land’ and ‘Hidden Figures’ Thrive at the New Years’ Box Office

  • Indiewire
‘La La Land’ and ‘Hidden Figures’ Thrive at the New Years’ Box Office
Two films that have received some of the season’s best reviews — Mike Mills’ “20th Century Women” and Jim Jarmusch’s “Paterson” — opened in New York and Los Angeles last Wednesday. However, the weekend’s real arthouse story lies with “La La Land,” which is on a trajectory to earn more than $100 million by the end of its run.

Read More: Box Office 2017 Opens With ‘Sing’ Making a Run at ‘Rogue One

The post-Christmas release ploy platform has become routine every year for a film or two, with their distributors hoping the absence of other new films and stellar elements, particularly in relation to awards hopes, elevate their initial numbers.

Opening

20th Century Women (A24) – Metacritic: 82; Festivals include: New York 2016

$112,705 in four theaters; PTA (per theater average): $28,176; Cumulative: $180,081

Mike Mills’ study of late 1970s Santa Barbara counterculture and some strong female characters led by Annette Bening and Greta Gerwig
See full article at Indiewire »

Joshua Reviews Jim Jarmusch’s Paterson [Theatrical Review]

Christmas is over, and as we race to the conclusion of what has been a seemingly unanimously loathed 2016, film critics and cinephiles alike are continuing to formulate their respective best-of-the-year lists. Films from throughout the year are being discussed seriously and in ways that previous points in the year really don’t offer up. However, the year isn’t quite over yet, and there is one film that is in dire need of deep consideration as one of the very best films of not only this year but its director’s much-lauded career.

That film is Paterson, a quiet, poetic new neo-drama from beloved auteur Jim Jarmusch. Drawing its name from both the New Jersey city as well as the film’s fictional lead character, Paterson (as well as an epic poem from William Carlos Williams who gets name dropped throughout the film), almost from the outset, proclaims its observational conceit.
See full article at CriterionCast »

‘Paterson’ Oral History: 5 Longtime Jim Jarmusch Collaborators Reveal What It’s Like to Work with Him

‘Paterson’ Oral History: 5 Longtime Jim Jarmusch Collaborators Reveal What It’s Like to Work with Him
A Jim Jarmusch movie is unmistakable. He’s a storyteller who favors richness of detail over plot, whether it’s reunited vampires (“Only Lovers Left Alive”), escaped prisoners (“Down By Law”), or a cousin visiting from Budapest (“Stranger Than Paradise”). Small in scale, generous in production value, and tempered with idiosyncratic rhythms and dry humor, his films represent one the most original and uncompromised bodies of work in American cinema.

However, while Jarmusch might seem to be an auteur-theory poster child, the filmmaker told IndieWire’s David Ehrlich in 2014 (then writing for The Guardian) that he doesn’t believe, for him, the concept of director-as-author applies:

“I put ‘A film by’ as a protection of my rights, but I don’t really believe it. It’s important for me to have a final cut, and I do for every film. So I’m in the editing room every day, I
See full article at Indiewire »

The Best Movies of 2016, According to IndieWire Critic Eric Kohn

The Best Movies of 2016, According to IndieWire Critic Eric Kohn
Every December it bears repeating: Anyone who thinks this was a bad year for movies simply hasn’t seen enough. In an age of binge-viewing, a preponderance of must-see premium cable shows and, hell, even smartphone apps that command far more attention most feature-length achievements, the true range of quality cinema is often obscured by the noise of an ever-cluttered media landscape. To really assess the state of modern movies, one look beyond the obvious. Sure, it was a weak year for movies that stand out mainly due to star power and sizable marketing budgets, but those options represent only a small fraction of the marketplace.

The film festival circuit provides an ideal alternative to conventional channels for discovering movies worth talking about all year long — and, if they’re lucky enough to land distribution, they quality for year-end celebration on lists like this one. This year, every single finalist
See full article at Indiewire »

Jim Jarmusch interview – On Paterson, casting Adam Driver and how to cope with Donald Trump

  • HeyUGuys
Few voices in independent American cinema are quite as distinct as Jim Jarmusch, the auteur behind Stranger Than Paradise, Broken Flowers and Only Lovers Left Alive. For the release of his latest film, Paterson, in which Adam Driver plays a poetry-writing bus driver, we got a chance to sit down at a roundtable with the man himself […]

The post Jim Jarmusch interview – On Paterson, casting Adam Driver and how to cope with Donald Trump appeared first on HeyUGuys.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

The Weekend Warrior 10/28/16: Inferno, Gimme Danger and More

Welcome back to the Weekend Warrior, your weekly look at the new movies hitting theaters this weekend, as well as other cool events and things to check out.

This Past Weekend:

In one of the busier weekends of the month, two of the movies did better than I predicted and two did worse. The real winner of the weekend was Tyler Perry’s Boo! A Madea Halloween, which did far better than anyone thought with an opening weekend of $28.5 million in just 2,260 theaters or $12,611 per theater. It ended up completely demolishing Tom Cruise’s action sequel Jack Reacher: Never Go Back, which opened in almost 1,500 more theaters, but at least that ended up around where I predicted with $22.9 million. Ouija: Origin of Evil came out slightly below my prediction to take third place with $14 million, while the Fox comedy Keeping Up with the Joneses bombed even worse than I expected with $5.5 million in 3,000 theaters.
See full article at LRM Online »

Iggy Pop and Jim Jarmusch: 'The world urinated on the Stooges'

In Detroit, the director and rock legend unite to discuss a cathartic new documentary about the Stooges, the ultimate ‘ass-kicking rock’n’roll band’

When Jim Jarmusch took the stage of the Detroit Film Theatre on Tuesday night, he sounded rather amused that his new documentary about Iggy Pop and the Stooges was about to be screened in such an ornate venue.

“I don’t think they could’ve even allowed the Stooges to be here,” Jarmusch, the Ohio director known for eccentric films Stranger Than Paradise and Broken Flowers, told a sold-out crowd.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Tiff 2016: 33 Films From The Festival We’ve Already Seen

  • Indiewire
Tiff 2016: 33 Films From The Festival We’ve Already Seen
The Toronto International Film Festival kicks off this week, and with it, the rest of a very busy fall festival season. In preparation for the Canadian festival, we’ll be rolling out a series of previews to point you in the direction of all the movies you have to see (or at least, all the movies you have to start anticipating right now). Next up, a batch of features we’ve already seen — and can heartily recommend to an eager Tiff audience.

Loving

This year’s Cannes Film festival featured director Jeff Nichols’ latest historical drama “Loving.” Our own Eric Kohn’s review of the film highlights the performances and Nichols’ screenplay: “Nichols sets the stage for a soft-spoken narrative in which his actors’ faces tell the story. As Richard, Edgerton’s ideally cast to play a low key character less invested in grand statements than maintaining his private life.
See full article at Indiewire »

Adam Driver’s ‘Paterson’ Gets Awards-Season Release Date (Exclusive)

Adam Driver’s ‘Paterson’ Gets Awards-Season Release Date (Exclusive)
Jim Jarmusch’s “Paterson” will hit theaters at the end of 2016, Variety has learned.

Amazon Studios is backing the indie drama and is partnering with Bleecker Street on the film’s release. The movie will get a platform release, expanding its theatrical footprint gradually. It will debut on Dec. 28, which allows it to qualify for awards. That’s a busy time of year, one that will also see the launches of Oscar contenders such as “Toni Erdmann,” an acclaimed German comedy, and “Patriot’s Day,” a drama about the Boston Marathon bombing.

Paterson” centers on a bus driver (Adam Driver of “Girls” and “Star Wars: The Force Awakens”), following him on his daily routine, as he ferries passengers around the city of Paterson, N.J. All the while, the driver, who is also named Paterson, channels his observations into poetry, scratching out his writing in a notebook that he carries.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jim Jarmusch Talks ‘Paterson,’ His Love for Poetry & Hip-Hop, Tilda Swinton, and Being Grateful

Legendary American independent filmmaker Jim Jarmusch has been a frequent visitor to the Cannes Film Festival ever since winning the Camera d’Or for Stranger Than Paradise in 1984. He took the Grand Jury prize in 2005 for Broken Flowers but has never managed to nab the Big One. His latest film, Paterson, which premiered last week in competition here, is the story of a bus driver (played by Adam Driver) named Paterson who lives in Paterson NJ, walks his wife’s bulldog, Marvin, and writes poems in his spare time. We sat down with the great silver-haired Son of Lee Marvin to talk hip-hop, Tilda Swinton, and the poetry of everyday things.

Some critics have called this your most personal film. How do would you respond to a statement like that?

I don’t know. With our last film, Only Lovers Left Alive, everyone said “Aha! His most personal film!” I don’t know.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Jim Jarmusch Dp Frederick Elmes on Capturing the Soulful Essence of 'Paterson'

Jim Jarmusch Dp Frederick Elmes on Capturing the Soulful Essence of 'Paterson'
Early word is in from Cannes, and Jim Jarmusch's new film "Paterson" has quickly has risen to everybody's must-see list for the fall (please Amazon, don't make us wait longer than that). Indiewire talked with the film's cinematographer Frederick Elmes ("Broken Flowers," "Blue Velvet") to discuss his collaboration with the great auteur. What we got was not only wonderful insight to how he created the look of "Paterson," but a sneak peak into Jarmusch's process of capturing all the subtle, textured detail that gives his films their essence and soul.   Read More:  Cannes Review - Adam Driver Stars in Jim Jarmusch's 'Paterson,' His Most Intimate Film "After I finished shooting 'Paterson,' friends would ask what the film was about and I start to explain, 'It's about a bus driver who lives in Paterson, his name is Paterson, he's a poet,' and then I'd struggle and end up saying,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Force is not with them: 14 celebs who admitted they haven't seen 'Star Wars'

  • Hitfix
The Force is not with them: 14 celebs who admitted they haven't seen 'Star Wars'
On Tuesday, noted arthouse director Jim Jarmusch (Dead Man, Broken Flowers, Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai) admitted he's never watched any of the Star Wars movies and doesn't plan on starting now. "I’ve never seen any Stars Wars films," he told Variety at the Cannes Film Festival. "I don’t know if it’s just a stubborn punk rock thing, where I intend to go to my grave having never seen Star Wars. I’ve never seen Gone with the Wind either." Call Jarmusch pretentious if you must, but he's far from the first high-profile individual to publicly fess up to their ignorance of the widely-beloved franchise (specifically, Episodes IV-vi). Below are 14 others who have been brave enough to do the same. Before we get to the list, a few clarifications are in order first: 1. The list is concerned with those who haven't seen Episode IV/the original trilogy (1977-1983). So,
See full article at Hitfix »
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