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(2005)

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Fantastic Fest Had a Rough Year, But the Best Movies Featured Powerful Women

  • Indiewire
Fantastic Fest Had a Rough Year, But the Best Movies Featured Powerful Women
This year, Fantastic Fest turned 13, a number that felt apt if you’ve been following the news. Most conversations started like this:

“How are you?”

“How are you?”

Exhale. Hug. Repeat.

Eventually, people got around to talking about the films. Even those were emotional.

Tortured Souls

In past years, bringing context into the Alamo Drafthouse theater meant deciding not to chomp chips and queso during a hushed thriller. This time, audiences welled up watching Carla Guigino confront a lifetime of abuse as the emotionally and physically handcuffed wife in Stephen King’s “Gerald’s Game,” a Lifetime movie-looking low budget adaptation whose blockbuster impact at the Fest might not translate to people at home when it premieres on Netflix. (Guigino, however, is terrific in a dual-of-sorts role as the manacled victim and her empowered subconscious.)

Read More:Fantastic Fest Under Fire: Why America’s Preeminent Genre Festival Needs Its Fans
See full article at Indiewire »

In the Last Days of the City review – adrift in Cairo as the Arab spring looms

A film-maker returns to the place of his boyhood on a quest for love and creative fulfilment in this melancholy cine-journal

In the Last Days of the City is a densely textured, contemplative, beautifully shot film in a self-reflexive, docu-realist style about Cairo in the era just before the Tahrir Square uprising of 2011: the director Tamer El Said uses footage he has amassed over years of filming in Cairo.

In a way, it imports the complications and disappointments that followed Egypt’s Arab spring back to that time; there is no euphoria here. It is a very New Wave movie, recording images of the city as a film-maker in a previous time might have shot in Paris in 1968.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Last Day of June’ Review (PS4)

I don’t often start a review with a spoiler warning, but this time I feel I should. If you’ve not played Last Day of June, it is best to play it through before reading a review. If you are willing to have minor spoilers that will inevitably leak through, then you have been warned. Suffice to say, Last Day of June is a beautiful game that should be played.

It seems that while some bigger Triple A games are caught in the trap of having to focus on what is known to be profitable, independent titles have some space to manoeuvre in what they provide to the audience they cater for. This is why we see many with a focus on emotions, and creating an experience for the player that is beyond just point and shoot, or solve a puzzle to continue.

This is where Last Day of June finds its strength,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Alec Baldwin To Play John DeLorean In Scripted Scenes For Docu About Famous Automaker

Alec Baldwin To Play John DeLorean In Scripted Scenes For Docu About Famous Automaker
Alec Baldwin is stepping into the driver’s seat for Xyz Films’ forthcoming documentary about John DeLorean. The docu will be fused with scripted scenes which will feature Baldwin will playing the iconic automaker. To give him the look of the man who brought us the iconic, cutting-edge car of the ’80s, Baldwin has enlisted the help from his hair and makeup team from Saturday Night Live. The film is directed by Don Argott and Sheena M. Joyce (The Art of the Steal, Last Days
See full article at Deadline »

‘Lean on Pete’ Review: Andrew Haigh’s Horse Starts Quick, Then Fades | Venice 2017

Indie movie characters who live in the Pacific Northwest are most often depicted as pioneers in modern times, losing themselves in the wilderness and constantly trying to reinvent themselves, never asking anyone for help. This has been explored by Gus Van Sant from his very first film, Mala Noche and comes back whenever Van Sant gets the itch to return to his indie roots after a studio film, like in Elephant, Gerry, Paranoid Park and Last Days. The newest Northwest indie darling, Kelly Reichardt, has similarly used small moments to explore this delicate evergreen unraveling from Old Joy through Certain …
See full article at Collider.com »

Why You Should Watch the Film “Wise Hassan”

Wise Hassan is a thriller by Palestinian filmmaker Tawfik Abu Wael, whose other works were in 2004 and Last Days in Jerusalem in 2011. Given its name, it should come as no surprise to learn that the movie is centered around a man named Hassan. However, chances are high that most people would not be able to guess even the general outlines of its content. Hassan is a Palestinian man who wants to study mathematics overseas but lacks the means to do so. Since he has no real options, he is convinced to kill a man named Lulu who has

Why You Should Watch the Film “Wise Hassan”
See full article at TVovermind.com »

9 Films New to Netflix to Watch in August 2017, Including ‘The Matrix’ Trilogy and ‘Jackie Brown’

9 Films New to Netflix to Watch in August 2017, Including ‘The Matrix’ Trilogy and ‘Jackie Brown’
Netflix may have cancelled the Wachowski’s cult hit “Sense 8,” but its adding two of their defining works to its streaming library next month. All three entries in “The Matrix” trilogy are heading to Netflix, as is the ambitious “Cloud Atlas,” which means you’ll be able to bring summer to an end by bingeing mind-melting science fiction.

Read More: Netflix Is Not the Problem: Why Bad Theatrical Presentations Are Destroying the Experience

Other titles joining the streaming service include underrated gems from Quentin Tarantino and Michael Haneke, plus two of the year’s most exciting documentary films. Check out a complete list of all the new movies joining Netflix in August 2017 below, including our 7 must-binge choices.

The Matrix” Trilogy (August 1)

August kicks off with “The Matrix,” “The Matrix Reloaded” and “The Matrix Revolutions” all becoming available to stream on Netflix. Say what you want about the two sequels, but
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Wise Hassan’ Wins Top Prize at Jerusalem Film Festival’s 12th Pitch Point Event

“Wise Hassan,” a Tel Aviv-set thriller directed by Palestinian filmmaker Tawfik Abu Wael, scooped the top prize of the 12th edition of Pitch Point, a competitive industry event hosted alongside the Jerusalem Film Festival.

One of the seven films in production presented at Pitch Point, “Wise Hassan” won the Van Leer Award, worth 20,000 Nis ($5,500).

The film marks Abu Wael’s third feature after “Last Days in Jerusalem,” which competed at Locarno, and “Thirst,” which opened Cannes Critics’ Week in 2004 and won the Fipresci prize.

Produced by Baher Agbariya at Haifa-based Majdal Films, “Wise Hassan” centers on 27-year-old Hassan, who lives with his mother and dreams of changing his fate. Hassan agrees to take part in a plot to assassinate Lulu, a collaborator living in Tel Aviv who turns out to be a transgender female working as a prostitute. The character-driven thriller follows the tribulations, disintegration and revival of this young man as he discovers the margins of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jerusalem Film Festival unveils 2017 Pitch Point winners

  • ScreenDaily
Wise Hassan, Asia take top prizes.

The winners from the 12th edition of Jerusalem Pitch Point have been unveiled at the Jerusalem Film Festival.

The initiative’s top prize, dubbed the Van Leer Award and worth $5,500 (20,000 Nis), went to Palestinian filmmaker Tawfik Abu Wael’s Wise Hassan.

A Tel Aviv-set thriller, the film marks the director’s third feature after Thirst (Atash), which premiered in Cannes Critics’ Week in 2004, and Last Days In Jerusalem.

It is being produced by Baher Agbariya at Haifa-based Majdal Films, who presented the project alongside Abu Wael at the Jerusalem Pitch Point event on Sunday (July 16).

The Db & Opus Award, which comes with post-production services in the value of $15,000 (55,000 Nis), was presented to Ruthy Pribar’s Asia.

The project was presented by Yoav Roeh and Aurit Zamir of Tel-Aviv based Gum Films. It is currently completing financing ahead of production. The story will follow a 35-year-old mother who must face the death
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Tawfik Abu Wael unveils Tel Aviv-set thriller 'Wise Hassan'

Tawfik Abu Wael unveils Tel Aviv-set thriller 'Wise Hassan'
Thirst and Last Days In Jerusalem director plots next project.

Palestinian filmmaker Tawfik Abu Wael is developing a Tel Aviv-set thriller spinning off the love story between a young man from the Arab town of Umm al-Fahm and a transgender prostitute he is sent to kill for collaborating with the Israeli secret services.

It will be Abu Wael’s third feature after Thirst (Atash), which premiered in Cannes Critics’ Week in 2004, and Last Days In Jerusalem [pictured], which debuted in competition at the Locarno Film Festival in 2011.

Abu Wael and his long-time producer Baher Agbariya at Haifa-based Majdal Films presented the project at the Jerusalem Pitch Point event on Sunday aimed at connecting Israeli-funded productions with international partners.

“After two hardcore arthouse films, I’m trying to make a thriller,” he told the participants, who included top industry figures such as Protagonist Pictures CEO Michael Goodridge and Tanja Meissner, sales chief at Paris-based Memento Films International (Mfi).

The
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Tawfik Abu Wael unveils Tel Aviv-set gay thriller 'Wise Hassan'

Tawfik Abu Wael unveils Tel Aviv-set gay thriller 'Wise Hassan'
Thirst and Last Days In Jerusalem director plots next project.

Palestinian filmmaker Tawfik Abu Wael is developing a Tel Aviv-set thriller spinning off the love story between a young man from the Arab town of Umm al-Fahm and a transgender prostitute he is sent to kill for collaborating with the Israeli secret services.

It will be Abu Wael’s third feature after Thirst (Atash), which premiered in Cannes Critics’ Week in 2004, and Last Days In Jerusalem [pictured], which debuted in competition at the Locarno Film Festival in 2011.

Abu Wael and his long-time producer Baher Agbariya at Haifa-based Majdal Films presented the project at the Jerusalem Pitch Point event on Sunday aimed at connecting Israeli-funded productions with international partners.

“After two hardcore arthouse films, I’m trying to make a thriller,” he told the participants, who included top industry figures such as Protagonist Pictures CEO Michael Goodridge and Tanja Meissner, sales chief at Paris-based Memento Films International (Mfi).

The
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Casting a Nirvana Movie Biopic

The band Nirvana helped define an era. Nirvana was instrumental in establishing the “Grunge Rock” genre during the late 1980’s and the early 1990’s. Before his suicide at 27 years old, founding member Kurt Cobain helped define a “Generation X” and will always be remembered for his artistry. There have been books written and plans to make films about the band for decades. In 2005 Gus Van Sant directed a movie, “Last Days” loosely based on the band and Kurt Cobain’s last days. A 2015 docudrama directed by Benjamin StatlerSoaked In Bleach” followed the last days of Cobain’s life

Casting a Nirvana Movie Biopic
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Lena Dunham Reveals Why She Had to Give Up Her Dog Lamby in Emotional Instagram Post

Lena Dunham Reveals Why She Had to Give Up Her Dog Lamby in Emotional Instagram Post
Lena Dunham is sharing the heartbreaking reason she had to give up her beloved dog, Lamby.

In an emotional Instagram post, shared on Wednesday, the Girls star opened up about why she no longer has been sharing pics of her furry white pup.

Related: Lena Dunham Shares Entirely Nude Photo of Herself in Body-Positive Message: ‘Love It All’

"A lot of you have been asking where Lamby is these days since he's always been the
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Lena Dunham Shares Entirely Nude Photo of Herself in Body-Positive Message: ‘Love It All’

Lena Dunham Shares Entirely Nude Photo of Herself in Body-Positive Message: ‘Love It All’
Lena Dunham has learned to love all of herself! The Girls creator, 31, took to Instagram on Thursday to share an entirely nude pic of her tattoo-covered torso.

Watch: Exclusive: Go Behind the Scenes of Lena Dunham and 'Girls' Cast's Emotional Last Days on Set

Dunham covered up her privates with pear emojis and a honey pot in the revealing photo.

“I spent so many years loving my body but thinking it wasn't lovable by others- its sole purpose was to be fodder for jokes,” she wrote. “I performed the insult so no one else could. I don't regret any of it- that's my art and that was my truth- but now, at age 31, having been through hell and back with my health and other people's perceptions of my physicality, I feel deeply comfortable with the idea that this pear-shaped pot of honey is equally good for making people laugh and laying out like a Suicide
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Arab Cinema in Cannes

Two new film festivals in the Arab world — and not in the Gulf States region where Kuwait had its first festival last month — have announced their first editions. Jordan and Egypt, along with the first ever Arab Critics Awards casts a new light onto just what Arab cinema is.

What began several years ago in the recently oil-rich Gulf nations of Dubai, Abu-Dhabi and Qatar who first brought the notion of Arab cinema to the western world with expensive receptions (including a camel one year at the Toronto Film Festival) and ultra fancy festivals (Abu Dhabi has since bowed out of its Tribeca Ff partnership and pulled back on all but its film fund) has now come to a more balanced sharing of Arabic cinema as a multi-culturally wealthy medium.

With the growth of Cairo-based Mad Solutions which started as a public relations agency for Arab-content cinema and expanded into
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Cannes Ends with…Awards — 3rd of 3

Cannes Ends with…Awards — 3rd of 3

The heightened security with machine gun armed soldiers and policemen constantly patrolling was intensified after the Manchester Massacre. With a pall over the festival, one minute of silence was observed for the 22 murdered and flags hung at half-mast. In addition to that, the sudden death at 57 of the Busan Film Festival deputy director Kim Ji-seok and that of the James Bond star Roger Moore brought the film world into a new perspective as we join the larger world to face the random indications of human mortality. High security vs. cinema as a sanctuary of freedom is highlighted this year like no other time that I can recall in my 31 years here.President of the jury, Pedro Almodovar

But life does go on, the jury judges, the stars get press attention on the red carpet and the rest of us continue to wait patiently in
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Exclusive: Alex Karpovsky on Why He Sticks to Indies and Ray's 'Happy Ending' on 'Girls'

Exclusive: Alex Karpovsky on Why He Sticks to Indies and Ray's 'Happy Ending' on 'Girls'
Alex Karpovsky is no stranger to a film festival. In the past year alone, he has had movies premiere at South by Southwest (Fits and Starts), Sundance (Sidney Hall), Tiff (My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea) and Tribeca (Folk Hero & Funny Guy, in which Karpovsky plays a struggling stand-up comedian who gets roped into opening for his more successful singer-songwriter friend on tour). Yet, when Karpovsky phoned Et to discuss Folk Hero & Funny Guy, out now, he said that he's the least busy he's been in years, despite having also had a prominent role as Ray Ploshansky in the sixth and finale season of HBO's Girls.

"I feel like there are guys working a lot harder than I am," Karpovsky laughed, explaining that he started acting in his early 30s when he and his friends would act in one another's independent movies. "I tried not to [turn friends down] as much as possible, just because
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Twin Peaks Revival Premiere Recap: The Meaning of the Box Is Threefold?

Twin Peaks Revival Premiere Recap: The Meaning of the Box Is Threefold?
If you’ve come to this recap of the Twin Peaks revival premiere seeking answers about what the heck happens in the series premiere, I’m going to have to make like Cooper in the Black Lodge and say next to nothing.

Because, honestly, Nadine’s drape runners have a better idea of what’s going on in the two-hour huh?-fest than I do. It doesn’t mean I won’t recount the highlights of the long-awaited continuation’s first installments, it just means that this long-time fan found the first few episodes tough to navigate.

A note about
See full article at TVLine.com »

Mohamed Diab, Tamer El Said triumph at Arab Critics' Awards in Cannes

Mohamed Diab, Tamer El Said triumph at Arab Critics' Awards in Cannes
Exclusive: Egyptian revolution dramas loom large in first edition of awards.

Egyptian director Mohamed Diab has won best director and best screenplay for his revolution drama Clash [pictured], which opened Un Certain Regard last year, in the first edition of the Arab Critics’ Awards.

The film-maker, who is back in Cannes this year as a member of the Un Certain Regard jury, will receive the award at a special ceremony at Cannes Film Festival today (May 21).

The prize for best film went to Tamer El Said’s In the Last Days Of The City, which captures Cairo in the lead-up to the revolution through a film-maker receiving footage from friends based in Beirut, Baghdad and Berlin.

Best actor went to Tunisia’s Majd Mastoura for his performance in Tunisian revolution allegory Hedi and best actress went to Heba Ali for Withered Green.

Overseen by the Arab Cinema Center (Acc), the Arab Critics’ Awards involves 24 jury members from 15 countries
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Mohamed Diab, El Tamer triumph at Arab Critics' Awards in Cannes

Mohamed Diab, El Tamer triumph at Arab Critics' Awards in Cannes
Exclusive: Egyptian revolution dramas loom large in first edition of awards.

Egyptian director Mohamed Diab has won best director and best screenplay for his revolution drama Clash [pictured], which opened Un Certain Regard last year, in the first edition of the Arab Critics’ Awards.

The film-maker, who is back in Cannes this year as a member of the Un Certain Regard jury, will receive the award at a special ceremony at Cannes Film Festival today (May 21).

The prize for best film went to Tamer El Said’s In the Last Days Of The City, which captures Cairo in the lead-up to the revolution through a film-maker receiving footage from friends based in Beirut, Baghdad and Berlin.

Best actor went to Tunisia’s Majd Mastoura for his performance in Tunisian revolution allegory Hedi and best actress went to Heba Ali for Withered Green.

Overseen by the Arab Cinema Center (Acc), the Arab Critics’ Awards involves 24 jury members from 15 countries
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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