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Five Great Ridley Scott Audio Commentaries

  • Slash Film
Five Great Ridley Scott Audio Commentaries
In 1965, Sir Ridley Scott made his directorial debut with the short film, Boy and Bicycle. His illustrious filmmaking career began with a short that cost him $120 and starred his brother, the late Tony Scott. It led to a career that is nothing short of spectacular, one never lacking passion or permanence. He’s a filmmaker who’s been ahead of the […]

The post Five Great Ridley Scott Audio Commentaries appeared first on /Film.
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Ridley Scott Feted by Matt Damon, Russell Crowe and Sigourney Weaver

Ridley Scott Feted by Matt Damon, Russell Crowe and Sigourney Weaver
“Let’s grab this night by the pussy,” said Russell Crowe, exhorting the Beverly Hilton ballroom attendees at the annual American Cinematheque Ball to go out and vote on election day. Then the night’s charming master of ceremonies got down to the business at hand: tributing director Ridley Scott.

Crowe reminded us that Scott made his first feature film at 40—and showed us his delightful black and white 1962 “Boy and Bicycle” short student film, shot on a borrowed 16mm camera and starring his younger brother by six years, Tony, who also became a director.

At night’s end, when grateful “The Martian” Oscar nominee Matt Damon presented Scott, 78, with his award, Scott tracked back in time, recalling how he wasn’t a very good student, hard as he tried, and the teacher who suggested that he go to art school. Scott attended the Royal College of Art and studied film,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Ridley Scott Feted by Matt Damon, Russell Crowe and Sigourney Weaver

  • Indiewire
Ridley Scott Feted by Matt Damon, Russell Crowe and Sigourney Weaver
“Let’s grab this night by the pussy,” said Russell Crowe, exhorting the Beverly Hilton ballroom attendees at the annual American Cinematheque Ball to go out and vote on election day. Then the night’s charming master of ceremonies got down to the business at hand: tributing director Ridley Scott.

Crowe reminded us that Scott made his first feature film at 40—and showed us his delightful black and white 1962 “Boy and Bicycle” short student film, shot on a borrowed 16mm camera and starring his younger brother by six years, Tony, who also became a director.

At night’s end, when grateful “The Martian” Oscar nominee Matt Damon presented Scott, 78, with his award, Scott tracked back in time, recalling how he wasn’t a very good student, hard as he tried, and the teacher who suggested that he go to art school. Scott attended the Royal College of Art and studied film,
See full article at Indiewire »

Russell Crowe, Matt Damon Toast Ridley Scott at American Cinematheque Fete

Russell Crowe, Matt Damon Toast Ridley Scott at American Cinematheque Fete
If director Ridley Scott didn’t get his fill of lifetime achievement recognition during last year’s awards season, when his film “The Martian” was on a crash course with Oscar night, the American Cinematheque was ready and willing to oblige.

The org honored Scott with its 30th annual honor Friday night. Actor Russell Crowe served as host of the evening’s festivities.

“At this point it’s very clear that Ridley Scott is a filmmaker with the talent to do anything he wants in any genre you care to mention,” Crowe said. “From film noir to fantasy, from comedy to crime, from period pieces to the distant future, this man can do it all … He not only knows the language of film, he speaks all of its dialects. He speaks camera, editing, grip, gaffer, hair, makeup, all of those things — and he’s getting better at speaking actor.”

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See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Exodus: Gods and Kings’ Director Ridley Scott on Creating His Vision of Moses

‘Exodus: Gods and Kings’ Director Ridley Scott on Creating His Vision of Moses
The ideal place to meet Ridley Scott would be on a raging battlefield, in the furthest reaches of outer space, or in the midst of any of the other vast canvases on which he creates his movies.

Instead, we’re sitting in a basement salon at London’s trendy Ham Yard Hotel, where the 76-year-old director has parked himself, however briefly, to discuss his new biblical epic “Exodus: Gods and Kings,” and to ruminate on his long career.

“You’re probably going to be sitting down, so you’re not going to get a proper sense of him,” actor Christian Bale, who stars in Scott’s new film as Moses, warned this reporter a few days earlier. “You’ve got to see Rid on the move to understand him. He’s totally kinetic. I’m absolutely sure he springs out of bed at 10 times the speed I do.”

Australian actor Joel Edgerton,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Boy, Bike, Ridley and Tony

Yesterday I stumbled on the following short film from Ridley Scott titled "Boy and Bicycle" of which he directed in 1962 while a student at the Royal College of Art in London. Shot over the course of six weeks, for ?65 (approx. $108 today) on 16mm and featuring his brother, the late Tony Scott, in the lead role, the short follows a young teen as he skips school. The film was shot in various locations in Hartlepool, North East England. The short would eventually be finished in 1965 when Scott secured financing from the British Film Institute and would then include theme music by James Bond composer John Barry. The short immediately caught my eye and after searching the Internet for commentary from others, most of which feel they see imagery they will later recognize in Scott's Alien, Blade Runner and Black Rain, I think the more obvious discussion points are visual comparisons to
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Their First Movie: Watch Ridley Scott's 'Boy and Bicycle' from 1962

  • Movies.com
Looking back at a renowned filmmaker’s oeuvre, there are usually noticeable marks of talent and genius, even in the early years — something unique that sets them apart from the rest. Ridley Scott attended the Royal College of Art and eventually helped establish the school’s film department. During that time, in 1962, he made a 27-minute, 16 mm film that featured his younger brother, the recently departed Tony, as the young protagonist. Their father also appeared in the short. The footage for Boy and Bicycle was shot in a ravaged-looking, bleak Northeast England town with an industrial skyline. The imagery is striking, and the young Scott’s eye was already drawn to a darker motif. Here we can see elements of future works, particularly in the...

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Why ‘The Counselor’ Is One of Ridley Scott’s Best Films

Why ‘The Counselor’ Is One of Ridley Scott’s Best Films
The truth may not have a temperature, as Cameron Diaz’s leopard-spotted femme fatale says early on in Ridley Scott’s “The Counselor,” but watching the movie you may nevertheless feel a certain chill in the air, no matter the sun-scorched Southwestern locales. Chalk it up to the sangfroid of the characters and their stone-cold greed. There’s an iciness, too, in how the movie has been received: The opening weekend numbers are in and they’re disappointing, the venerable audience-polling firm CinemaScore has branded it with a grade of “D,” and the critics have, by and large, made with the movie like a cheetah with a jackrabbit. The reviews have been especially unkind to Scott, who has been accused of pretension and pomposity. And to his screenwriter, the celebrated novelist Cormac McCarthy, the message has been clear: Don’t quit your day job.

Well, let us acknowledge that Ridley Scott
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Watch Ridley Scott’s 1962 Student Film ‘Boy and Bicycle’ Starring Teenaged Tony Scott

This is another edition of Short Starts, where we present a weekly short film(s) from the start of a filmmaker or actor’s career. It’s not often we see a short film debut by someone of Ridley Scott‘s generation. And even if one does exist and is made available on the Internet, the copy tends to be poor quality. Check out the film school works of Spielberg and Scorsese on YouTube and see what I mean. And those guys seem most likely to have preserved that early amateur stuff, or else embarrassingly kept it hidden away. Scott’s first film, though, still looks amazing after more than 50 years and even transferred to non-hd video. It’s not a total surprise. The 27-minute black and white short, Boy and Bicycle, was ultimately paid for by the British Film Institute, which probably retained a good print. So when it was time to include it on the
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Blimps, canoes or ships

You don't see many blimps, canoes or ships on film these days, a sure sign that when you do it can only mean trouble

Bicycles

Premium Rush is a strange anomaly when it comes to bicycle movies, because it deals with the reality of urban cycling: every journey involves zipping between objects massive enough to immediately kill you, and the constant risk of slamming your spine awkwardly on the side of a skip because someone opened their car door unexpectedly. Traditionally, however, bikes on film tend to represent innocence and freedom. While his future lay in dystopian sci-fi and Russell Crowe grunting at things, Ridley Scott's first ever short Boy And Bicycle was concerned with nothing more than showing a young Tony Scott contemplatively pedalling around west Hartlepool and Seaton Carew when he should have been at school. Then take Et's centrepiece, where a boy's bicycle is propelled skywards
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Cool Videos: Tribute to director Tony Scott in the form of a Ridley Scott short

  • JoBlo
As we all come to grips with the loss of one of Hollywood's most esteemed directors, Tony Scott, there has been an outpouring of tributes to the man and his films.  This 1965 short film, Boy And Bicycle, directed by Tony's brother, Ridley Scott, features a young Tony (roughly 21 years old) exploring the streets and outskirts of England, played to Hans Zimmer's score for Tony's 1993 film, True Romance.  It's a touching picture of youth, freedom, and spirit, at a time before the great...
See full article at JoBlo »

Remembering Tony Scott Through Ridley’s Camera

  • Vulture
Remembering Tony Scott Through Ridley’s Camera
The written tributes for fallen director Tony Scott have been pouring in, and they're certainly touching. The cinematic odes will follow — supercuts of the most affecting moments in his films, behind-the-scenes footage of him directing on set, rediscovered interviews. But one of the most poignant remembrances possible has already arrived — footage of Ridley Scott's 1965 black-and-white short film Boy and Bicycle set to Hans Zimmer's uplifting theme to Tony Scott's True Romance. It's a beautiful thing to see Tony young, happy, and adventuring around England, fancying himself the world's only inhabitant. And of course those prone to morbid connections will want to note the moment when Tony inspects a bridge and then walks on its edge.
See full article at Vulture »

Tony Scott's films: still glowing after all these years

The director's fondness for quick cuts and tight editing resulted in a catalogue of simple but exhilarating action movies

'I feel the need … the need for speed!" is probably the most famous line from Tony Scott's most famous film, Top Gun (what else?), the movie that made Scott's career and defined the look of commercial films for the late 20th and early 21st century. It is also a line that sums up what audiences loved about Scott's movies, and what critics did not.

Despite the diversity of his career, a common thread throughout all his films, from the gleeful highs of Top Gun, Beverly Hills Cop II, True Romance, The Last Boy Scout and Crimson Tide, to the deadening lows of his first film The Hunger, Revenge and Domino (Keira Knightley plays a bounty hunter – let us speak no more about it), is the whizz-bang-chop-cut style. His spinning camera
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

R.I.P.: Tony Scott (1944 – 2012)

R.I.P.: Tony Scott (1944 – 2012)
Last night, some really sad news hit the net. Tony Scott, the acclaimed director of Top Gun, Beverly Hills Cop II, Crimson Tide, Spy Game and a producer on innumerable others, including this summer’s Prometheus, has died of an apparent suicide (according to Styd):

According to the Los Angeles County coroner’s officials, Scott (68) climbed a fence on the south side of the bridge’s apex and leapt off “without hesitation” around 12:30 p.m. Investigators found a note in Scott’s black Toyota Prius which listed contact information. A suicide note was later found at his office. A spokesman for the Scott family said: “I can confirm that Mr. Scott has indeed passed away. The family asks that their privacy be respected at this time.”

We here at FM would like to pay tribute to the master film director, and younger brother of Ridley Scott, by providing
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

Tony Scott: Everything You Need to Know About the Late Director

Tony Scott: Everything You Need to Know About the Late Director
Tony Scott was a showman. As news of his apparent suicide on Sunday prompts mourning across Hollywood, E! News takes a look back at the seminal moments of the acclaimed director's life and films, many of which contain some of the best action, coolest shootouts and most memorable quotes in movie history. The Family Business: Born June 21, 1944 in North Shields, Northumberland England, Scott was the youngest of three brothers. After starring at the age of 16 in older sibling Ridley Scott's debut short film, Boy and Bicycle, he followed in his brother's footsteps, graduating from the Royal College of Art.  He initially spent several years as a painter, but it wasn't long before Ridley came calling...
See full article at E! Online »

Tony Scott 1944 - 2012

"The most frightening thing I do in my life is getting up and shooting movies," said the director Tony Scott in 2009. "Every morning I'm bolt upright on one hour or two hours' sleep, before the alarm clock goes off. That's a good thing. That fear motivates me, and I enjoy that fear. I'm perverse in that way." Scott's take on film-making as an adrenalised, intimidating experience in itself was reflected in the tone and pace of his box-office hits, which included Top Gun (1986), Beverly Hills Cop II (1987) and Days of Thunder (1990).

A lover of fast cars and motorbikes on the screen and off, and a lifelong rock climber, Scott was adept at injecting thrills into his slick films. This approach rarely brought him critical acclaim and his movies were sometimes unfavourably compared with the more ambitious, philosophical works
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Tony Scott Stars in Brother Ridley's Movie as a Teen (Video)

  • The Wrap
Tony Scott Stars in Brother Ridley's Movie as a Teen (Video)
Tony Scott, who died Sunday at age 68 of an apparent suicide, is best known for his work behind the camera. But in "Boy and Bicycle," a 1962 film shot by his older brother Ridley Scott, the director wasn't averse to playing leading man. The black-and-white film, which Ridley shot on 16mm film with a spring-wound camera, stars Tony as a teenager playing hooky from school, riding his bike through the town of Hartlepool as he spends time at the beach and a fair and muses about a variety of topics. Also
See full article at The Wrap »

Watch: Early Ridley Scott Film "Boy and Bicycle" From 1962 Starring 16-Year-Old Tony Scott

  • Indiewire
Watch: Early Ridley Scott Film
This should add a little poignancy to today's shocking news that veteran action director Tony Scott ("Top Gun," "True Romance") has jumped to his death from a San Pedro bridge. TheSpace.org has made available a film held in the British Film Institute archives that Scott's older brother Ridley (the director of "Blade Runner" and "Gladiator") made some 50 years ealier, when Tony was just 16 years old. Titled "Boy and Bicycle," the 1962 work shot on a 16mm Bolex received post-production funding from the BFI, and it shows Tony on a day spent playing hookie from school. Check out the film. Update: See the film via YouTube below:
See full article at Indiewire »

Film News: ‘Top Gun,’ ‘True Romance’ Director Tony Scott Dies at 68

Los Angeles – Director Tony Scott, the high octane helmsman of “Top Gun” (1986), “True Romance” (1993), “Enemy of the State” (1998) and the recent “Unstoppable” (2010), died on Sunday of an apparent suicide. Los Angeles officials say that Scott jumped from the Vincent Thomas Bridge in San Pedro, California. He was 68.

Tony Scott directed many of best action movies of the 1980s and ‘90s, putting memorable spins on genres such as military, car racing, thrillers, spy and disaster movies. Admirers constantly reference dialogue from his unforgettable “True Romance,” and the pulse of his most notable films was rapid and elemental. He worked with actors as diverse as Tom Cruise, Gene Hackman, Robert Redford, Robert Duvall, Will Smith, Denzel Washington, Robert De Niro, Kevin Costner, Bruce Willis, Eddie Murphy, James Gandofini, Brad Pitt, Nicole Kidman, Susan Sarandon, John Travolta and Dennis Hopper.

Director Tony Scott on the Set in 2009 with “The Taking of Pelham 123
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

More rock'n'roll than Ridley

Scott Jr was the quintessential 80s film-maker – a studio-system master flogging high-concept thrills with dizzying panache

On Sunday lunchtime, Tony Scott drove his car to the Vincent Thomas bridge in the port district of Los Angeles, parked it in the eastbound lane and then leapt to his death in the water below. "He jumped without hesitation," official sources told the press – and that sounds about right. We shall probably never know what prompted the 68-year-old film-maker – a Hollywood titan, rich as Croesus and respected by his peers – to take his own life. But having made the decision, Scott was not the sort to equivocate. In films and in life, the man went at things headlong. He left the doubt and the navel-gazing to the arthouse crowd. He jumped without hesitation.

"I'm more classical and he's rock'n'roll," Ridley Scott once remarked of his younger brother, who followed him into the business after training in fine art.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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