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‘Get Out’: 10 Film References You May Have Missed, From ‘The Shining’ to ‘The Matrix’

‘Get Out’: 10 Film References You May Have Missed, From ‘The Shining’ to ‘The Matrix’
Get Out” has emerged as one of the biggest contenders so far this awards season, earning prizes from the Gotham Awards, the National Board of Review, the New York Film Critics Circle, and the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. Jordan Peele’s directorial debut may have come out all the way back in February, but it’s become the kind of classic that stays with critics and awards voters long after the credits roll.

Read More:‘Get Out’: Jordan Peele Reveals the Real Meaning Behind the Sunken Place

The film’s Blu-ray and DVD releases include Peele’s director’s commentary, which reveals some pretty specific film references many viewers probably never noticed. Peele has referred to “Get Out” numerous times as “‘The Stepford Wives’ meets ‘The Help,'” but those are only two of the movie’s many sources of inspiration.

Film School Rejects recently broke down dozens
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Blade Runner 2049,’ ‘Logan,’ and More: the Genre-Benders That Are Major Oscar Contenders

‘Blade Runner 2049,’ ‘Logan,’ and More: the Genre-Benders That Are Major Oscar Contenders
Every year, the studios take their best genre successes and try to push them beyond the technical ghetto. Oscar campaigners want to convince critics, guilds, and Oscar voters that their movie rises to the level of art. But it’s rare for fantasy, horror, thriller, action or comic-book movies to pass over to the Best Picture side.

When they do, it tends to be an exception like Peter Jackson’s fantasy “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy. All three films scored Best Picture nominations and technical wins: “Fellowship” scored 13 nominations and wins for Makeup, Visual Effects, and Cinematography; “The Two Towers” earned six and won Sound Editing and VFX; and then came the ultimate triumph for the finale “The Return of the King”: a grand sweep of all 11 nominations including Best Picture. But while “Lotr” fell into the fantasy genre, it was boosted by the literary pedigree of J.R.R. Tolkien.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Blade Runner 2049,’ ‘Logan,’ and More: the Genre-Benders That Are Major Oscar Contenders

‘Blade Runner 2049,’ ‘Logan,’ and More: the Genre-Benders That Are Major Oscar Contenders
Every year, the studios take their best genre successes and try to push them beyond the technical ghetto. Oscar campaigners want to convince critics, guilds, and Oscar voters that their movie rises to the level of art. But it’s rare for fantasy, horror, thriller, action or comic-book movies to pass over to the Best Picture side.

When they do, it tends to be an exception like Peter Jackson’s fantasy trilogy “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy. All three films scored Best Picture nominations and technical wins: “Fellowship” scored 13 nominations and wins for Makeup, Visual Effects, and Cinematography; “The Two Towers” earned six and won Sound Editing and VFX; and then came the ultimate triumph for the finale “The Return of the King”: a grand sweep of all 11 nominations including Best Picture. But while “Lotr” fell into the fantasy genre, it was boosted by the literary pedigree of J.R.R. Tolkien.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘High Maintenance’ Star Max Jenkins Sheds the Laughs in Poignant Short Film About Waiting for an HIV Test — Watch

‘High Maintenance’ Star Max Jenkins Sheds the Laughs in Poignant Short Film About Waiting for an HIV Test — Watch
“I love doing stuff that’s not overtly comedy, because I think life is really funny, especially in intensely panicked moments,” Max Jenkins told IndieWire in a recent interview. After making a splash in comedic television roles in HBO’s “High Maintenance” and NBC’s short-lived “The Mysteries of Laura,” the actor took a turn for the dramatic in “The Mess He Made,” a poignant short film about a man awaiting the results of an HIV test. Directed and written by Matthew Puccini, the film is a beautifully restrained representation of an emotionally fraught yet all too common experience for many gay men.

“I knew what I wanted to do as soon as I read the script,” said Jenkins. “It’s easy with a good script. You don’t really have to prepare too much. In this case…it was all there.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Get Out’ Wins Big at the Gotham Awards, Cementing Itself as an Oscar Frontrunner

The first ceremony in the 2017 movie awards season – the well-regarded Gotham Independent Film Awards – has come to a close. And from the night’s big winners and losers, one name stands out as a now-solidified frontrunner for the coveted Academy Awards early next year. Get Out, the little horror movie that could, is well on its way to winning big at the upcoming Oscar Ceremony. Get Out, the directorial debut for filmmaker Jordan Peele, is one of the year’s unquestionable masterpieces: a socially conscious horror movie in the vein of The Stepford Wives that depicts the seemingly well-to-do

Get Out’ Wins Big at the Gotham Awards, Cementing Itself as an Oscar Frontrunner
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Get Out Producer Jason Blum Says He'd Pay Money for President Trump to See Provocative Movie

  • PEOPLE.com
Get Out Producer Jason Blum Says He'd Pay Money for President Trump to See Provocative Movie
If President Donald Trump is interested in a movie night, Jason Blum has a suggestion.

The producer of Get Out, this year’s smash horror written and directed by Jordan Peele, told People at Monday’s Gotham Independent Film Awards in New York City that he would happily open his wallet for Trump to see the film.

“I would bet any amount of money he had not seen it, but I’d pay any amount of money for him to see it,” Blum says, before adding, “Well, not any amount.”

The film follows Chris Washington (Daniel Kaluuya), a young black
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

From ‘Mudbound’ to ‘Last Flag Flying’ and ‘Get Out,’ Directors Engage With Living History

From ‘Mudbound’ to ‘Last Flag Flying’ and ‘Get Out,’ Directors Engage With Living History
When Dee Rees’ “Mudbound” premiered at Sundance in January, and Jordan Peele’s “Get Out” stormed theaters late the following month, they seemed to have little in common. Rees had made a searing historical drama about the relationship between a white family and a black family in post-World War II Mississippi, and Peele had made a satirical horror film about a black man meeting his white girlfriend’s family in upstate New York. There’s a distance of 70 years between when their stories take place and a difference in milieu, too, between the rural Deep South, where Klansmen hold sway, and the suburban idyll of liberal Northerners in the present day.

And yet the two directors have made films that are in conversation with each other. Rees calls it “white currency” and Peele calls it “the post-racial lie,” but they’re each talking about racism and white supremacy as intractable problems in America, unsolved by seven
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscars Not So White: ‘Get Out’ and ‘Mudbound’ Lead Diverse 2018 Contenders

It would be lovely to think that last year’s “Moonlight” Oscar wins presaged a long and permanent shift in Hollywood movie culture. At the heart of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ complex diversity issue is how much the Oscars reflect the way that the Academy likes to view itself. That helps to explain why the Academy voters did far better with their 2017 Oscar nominations than the year before, when their 6,000 members failed to nominate any actors of color at all.

Read More:Barry Jenkins and Jordan Peele Among the 774 Invited to Join the Academy As It Pushes for Inclusion

The Academy’s recent diversity push added more younger and international members; its 7,000 voters are now 28 percent women and 13 percent people of color. But will the new membership shifts make a major impact on the 2018 Oscar nominations? Despite the new voters, the organization is still under the
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Oscars Not So White: ‘Get Out’ and ‘Mudbound’ Lead Diverse 2018 Contenders

It would be lovely to think that last year’s “Moonlight” Oscar wins presaged a long and permanent shift in Hollywood movie culture. At the heart of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ complex diversity issue is how much the Oscars reflect the way that the Academy likes to view itself. That helps to explain why the Academy voters did far better with their 2017 Oscar nominations than the year before, when their 6,000 members failed to nominate any actors of color at all.

Read More:Barry Jenkins and Jordan Peele Among the 774 Invited to Join the Academy As It Pushes for Inclusion

The Academy’s recent diversity push added more younger and international members; its 7,000 voters are now 28 percent women and 13 percent people of color. But will the new membership shifts make a major impact on the 2018 Oscar nominations? Despite the new voters, the organization is still under the
See full article at Indiewire »

Jordan Peele Shares 5 Filmmaking Lessons From His Eight-year Process of Making ‘Get Out’ — Watch

Jordan Peele Shares 5 Filmmaking Lessons From His Eight-year Process of Making ‘Get Out’ — Watch
Last weekend, Jordan Peele delivered the Keynote address at the Film Independent Forum. In an hour long conversation with film critic Elvis Mitchell, the sketch comedian-turned-director talked openly about what he learned during his eight-year journey of conceiving, writing and filming his directorial debut, “Get Out” – the breakout horror film that tackles the issues of race and has become not only one the year’s biggest box-office success stories, but finds itself in the midst of the awards conversation.

Read More:‘Get Out’ is a Serious Oscar Contender, and These 5 Scenes Prove It

Here are five important lessons Peele discovered in the process of making “Get Out.”

Internalizing Hollywood’s Lack of Representation

Peele told the Film Independent audience that he spent five years thinking about the story of “Get Out” before ever committing pen to paper. He knew it was an ambitious project, but he admits he initially constrained
See full article at Indiewire »

Blade Runner 2049 Has a Woman Problem

Blade Runner 2049 Has a Woman Problem
After a 35 year wait filled with seemingly endless new edits and versions of the original cinema classic, movie audiences were finally able to return to the futuristic noir dystopia of Blade Runner. Film critics have rightly marveled at the visual achievement of the two hour and 43 minute long Blade Runner 2049, which pairs Ryan Gosling with original star Harrison Ford in a new tale about human replicants.

But even with the elegant and immersive score, cinematography, solid casting, and direction from Denis Villeneuve and executive producer Ridley Scott, Blade Runner 2049 has a huge issue. As one writer put it on opening weekend: A Woman Problem. Here we'll take a look at why Blade Runner 2049 has a woman problem.

First and foremost, Blade Runner 2049 flunks the Bechdel Test.

We aren't taking anything away from the immense talents of gifted performers Robin Wright, Ana de Armas, Sylvia Hoeks, or Mackenzie Davis.
See full article at MovieWeb »

San Sebastián: Glenn Close Discusses ‘The Wife,’ Finding Inspiration, How to Celebrate Award Wins

San Sebastián: Glenn Close Discusses ‘The Wife,’ Finding Inspiration, How to Celebrate Award Wins
San Sebastian — There are few careers that boast the diversity and longevity of that of Glenn Close. There is neither medium nor genre that the actress has not worked in on some level. Typically recognized for her dramatic roles, think “Fatal Attraction,” Close has appeared in comedies: “The Stepford Wives,” “Louie,” animation: “Family Guy,” and “Tarza,” and big budget action films like Marvel’s “Guardians of the Galaxy,” series.

The actress was in town this week to promote her latest feature “The Wife,” in which Variety described her performance as “a marvel of twisty understatement.” Along with co-star Annie Starke, director Björn Runge and producer Claudia Bluemhuber, the four addressed the press Saturday morning.

The Wife,” is a story told from two perspectives, as described by Runge. “The young couple is creating a life together and the older is reflecting on that life. It’s the same characters, but they are on opposite sides.”

In
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tiff Review: ‘Gutland’ is an Atmospheric Thriller Set in a Nefarious Community

When a German drifter walks into the quaint Luxembourg village of Schandelsmillen with a scruffy beard, bag full of money, and stoically gruff attitude, we wonder what secrets his past holds. Jens Fauser (Frederick Lau) arrives with a single question: “Do you need help with the harvest?” That specific query unfortunately can’t help but make him stick out like a sore thumb further than he already does considering the harvest is half over. The townspeople therefore prove cold and cryptic, forcing him to accept work would be better found elsewhere. But as soon as that realization to move on arrives, the atmosphere abruptly shifts. Young Lucy (Vicky Krieps) invites him to her bed and old man Jos Gierens (Marco Lorenzini) takes him under wing. Suddenly he’s found home.

Writer/director Govinda Van Maele’s debut narrative feature Gutland shows this in rapid fashion so we never quite acknowledge everything’s inherent strangeness.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Toronto Film Review: ‘Mom & Dad’

Toronto Film Review: ‘Mom & Dad’
“We love you but sometimes we just want to kill you” is a thought that crosses nearly every frazzled parents’ mind sooner or later. That figurative sentiment is taken all too literally in “Mom & Dad,” which finds the gonzo sensibility that writer-director Brian Taylor applied most usefully to the “Crank” action movies working at least as well in comedic horror. Though sure to be distasteful for some viewers even to ponder, this giddy exercise transcends mere bad-taste humor to become one of the great jet-black comedies about suburbia, destined for the same cult-classic status accorded “The Stepford Wives,” “Parents” and “Heathers.”

After a particularly good example of the 1970s genre pic homage that has infiltrated so many movies’ opening credits of late, we settle into discordant ordinary life on a seemingly ordinary day on a generic middle-class cul-de-sac in Whateversburg, USA (the movie was shot in Kentucky). Our protagonists are likewise very ordinary, if
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Making Canaries: bringing an alien invasion to the Welsh valleys

Nikki Baughan Aug 25, 2017

Canaries is a British feature getting a Horror Channel FrightFest screening this weekend. We've been taking a look...

Think of big screen science fiction, and it’s likely to bring to mind glossy images of alien spacecrafts obliterating the White House, monsters running amuck in New York or Tokyo, or a post-apocalyptic Los Angelean wasteland. It’s perhaps unsurprising that these are the moments which linger in our collective consciousness; on screen at least, such cataclysmic events are usually clustered around the world’s big cities, with filmmakers giving little thought to how they might play out elsewhere.

There have been exceptions of course, such as classics like Village Of The Damned (1960) and The Stepford Wives (1975) and, in more recent years, UK filmmakers have also been looking to redress the balance. Marc Price set his 2008 zombie movie Colin on a suburban British estate, for example, while Stephen Fingleton
See full article at Den of Geek »

[Podcasts] Test Pattern – Episode 39: Who Goes There? – The Stepford Wives (1975) & Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)

[Podcasts] Test Pattern – Episode 39: Who Goes There? – The Stepford Wives (1975) & Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)
Jacob and Tab get paranoid with two dread-inducing films from the 1970s – The Stepford Wives (1975) and Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978). What if everyone around you was being systematically replaced by inhuman facsimiles? Subscribe and Listen to Past Episodes: iTunes | Google Play | Stitcher | Web Player “Test Pattern” is made […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

Film Review: ‘Awaken the Shadowman’

Film Review: ‘Awaken the Shadowman’
A slow burn of a horror drama that doesn’t build toward quite enough of a blaze to be truly memorable, “Awaken the Shadowman” nonetheless ranks a cut above the genre norm for its atmospheric and confident setup. This debut feature for director “J.S. Wilson” (actually a pseudonym for the three scenarist-producers, two of whom are also the male leads) finds estranged brothers reunited over their mother’s disappearance, but increasingly troubled even more by weird goings-on in the town where they grew up. Some horror fans will decry the lack of gore — or even much violence — here. More discerning ones, however, may just lament that a film with such a strong first two-thirds grows rushed and underwhelming in the last lap.

After a brief prologue depicting an imperiled young woman and baby in 1964 Connecticut, we meet present-day protagonist Adam (James Zimbardi), a Redding, Calif. construction worker struggling to meet the needs of his small family — to
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Blu-ray Review Round-Up: Invasion Of The Bee Girls, I Bury The Living, Virus, What’S The Matter With Helen?

As Scream Factory continues to release pared-down catalogue titles on their now five-year-old label, the brand keeps expanding to include all different kinds of movies. Once known for releasing deluxe special editions of horror fan favorites, the company has diversified over the last half decade and begun releasing new films (as part of their deal with IFC midnight), unknown (and sometimes previously unavailable) cult films, a handful of classics, and even their own in-house productions. This last batch of catalogue titles, the majority of which have been released with only minimum bonus features but new HD scans, continues to broaden the reach of the Scream Factory brand to include a range of titles from secretly successful ’70s sexploitation sci-fi to well-intentioned failures of the 1990s.

First up is the 1958 cult classic I Bury the Living, directed by Albert Band (father of low-budget horror legend Charles Band, who would go on
See full article at DailyDead »

Awards Race Disruption: Why ‘Get Out’ and Netflix Can Afford to Rewrite the Rules

Isn’t May a little early to launch an Oscar campaign? Not anymore. These days, it seems old rules don’t apply. On Tuesday evening, Universal marketing turned its “Get Out” DVD launch party into an ad-hoc awards event, inviting awards journalists to its Wisteria Lane backlot to celebrate Jordan Peele’s horror comedy about suburbia gone very wrong.

At $174 million to date (and an expected $50 million bonus rolling out overseas), “Get Out” is Blumhouse horror producer Jason Blum’s highest-grossing film (and his second Oscar contender, after “Whiplash”). And no one is more surprised to be in the awards conversation than breakout writer-director Peele, who is developing seven more original ideas for his new Universal first-look deal. Chances are, he’ll get more than $4.5 million to make them.

Being in any awards race is “a little surreal to me,” Peele told me. “I have a hard time accepting that’s part of the conversation.
See full article at Indiewire »

Awards Race Disruption: Why ‘Get Out’ and Netflix Can Afford to Rewrite the Rules

Isn’t May a little early to launch an Oscar campaign? Not anymore. These days, it seems old rules don’t apply. On Tuesday evening, Universal marketing turned its “Get Out” DVD launch party into an ad-hoc awards event, inviting awards journalists to its Wisteria Lane backlot to celebrate Jordan Peele’s horror comedy about suburbia gone very wrong.

At $174 million to date (and an expected $50 million bonus rolling out overseas), “Get Out” is Blumhouse horror producer Jason Blum’s highest-grossing film (and his second Oscar contender, after “Whiplash”). And no one is more surprised to be in the awards conversation than breakout writer-director Peele, who is developing seven more original ideas for his new Universal first-look deal. Chances are, he’ll get more than $4.5 million to make them.

Being in any awards race is “a little surreal to me,” Peele told me. “I have a hard time accepting that’s part of the conversation.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »
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