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Netflix release trailer for ‘The Indian Detective’

Set to be released via Netflix next month, comedy-drama The Indian Detective stars Russell Peters, William Shatner, Anupam Kher, Christina Cole, Mishqah Parthiephal, and Hamza Haq; and follows Toronto cop Doug D’Mello (Peters) as he becomes embroiled in a murder case while visiting his father in Mumbai.

The Indian Detective, a classic fish out-of-water story with equal doses of comedy and high-stakes drama, follows Toronto cop Doug D’Mello (Russell Peters) as he becomes embroiled in a murder case while visiting his father in Mumbai. The investigation leads Doug to uncover a dangerous conspiracy while dealing with his own ambivalence towards a country where, despite his heritage, he is an outsider. The four-part, one-hour, comedy-drama stars global comedy sensation Russell Peters in his first starring scripted role for television, and was filmed on location in Cape Town, Toronto and Mumbai. The Indian Detective also features Canadian icon William Shatner
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Netflix releases trailer for comedy-drama series The Indian Detective

Ahead of its arrival on Netflix next month, a trailer has been release for the upcoming comedy drama series The Indian Detective which stars Russell Peters, William Shatner, Anupam Kher, Christina Cole, Mishqah Parthiephal, and Hamza Haq; take a look below…

The Indian Detective, a classic fish out-of-water story with equal doses of comedy and high-stakes drama, follows Toronto cop Doug D’Mello (Russell Peters) as he becomes embroiled in a murder case while visiting his father in Mumbai. The investigation leads Doug to uncover a dangerous conspiracy while dealing with his own ambivalence towards a country where, despite his heritage, he is an outsider. The four-part, one-hour, comedy-drama stars global comedy sensation Russell Peters in his first starring scripted role for television, and was filmed on location in Cape Town, Toronto and Mumbai. The Indian Detective also features Canadian icon William Shatner; Bollywood Movie Award-winning veteran actor Anupam Kher (The Big Sick,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

International Newswire: ‘Mathilde’ Director to Helm Biopics about Shostakovich, Soviet Rock Star

International Newswire: ‘Mathilde’ Director to Helm Biopics about Shostakovich, Soviet Rock Star
In today’s International Newswire, the director of the controversial Russian film ‘Mathilde’ pushes forward with his follow-up projects, A&E puts more focus on producing local content, and Women and Hollywood celebrates London ‘trailblazers’.

Director Alexey Uchitel, whose sumptuous period melodrama “Mathilde” elicited a hostile response from some religious and nationalist groups in Russia, has spoken about his upcoming projects to international press at the first Fipresci colloquium dedicated to Russian cinema in St. Petersburg. “Mathilde’s” sales company has also disclosed the latest deals on the pic.

Uchitel’s next feature will center on the late Soviet rock-star Viktor Tsoi, he said. He is also developing a project about Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich. The helmer will no doubt be hoping for a warmer reception for these movies than that which greeted “Mathilde,” which recounts the passionate affair between the future Tsar Nicholas II and the Imperial Ballet star Mathilde Kschessinska.

The film almost
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Women and Hollywood Announces London Trailblazer Awardees & First-Time Female Filmmaker Contest…

Women and Hollywood Announces London Trailblazer Awardees & First-Time Female Filmmaker Contest WinnersTrailblazer Awardee Gurinder Chadha

Women and Hollywood is honored to share the recipients of the Trailblazer Awards, which will be given out during our upcoming 10th Anniversary event in London November 27 at The May Fair Hotel.

The awardees are director Gurinder Chadha (“Viceroy’s House,” “Bend it Like Beckham”), producers Alison Owen (“Harlots,” “Suffragette”) and Elizabeth Karlsen (“Carol,” “Made in Dagenham”), Robert Fox Ltd theater producer Zelda Perkins, BFI London Film Fest director Clare Stewart, and Bechdel Test Fest’s Corrina Antrobus and Simran Hans.

“Women and Hollywood has been highlighting the need for gender equality since before the conversation became mainstream. We are thrilled to be honoring these incredible women, from accomplished producers Alison Owen and Elizabeth Karlsen, to groundbreaking director Gurinder Chadha, to Clare Stewart, the leader of the BFI London Film Festival, as well as next
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Megan Colligan Out as Global Marketing Chief at Paramount (Exclusive)

Megan Colligan Out as Global Marketing Chief at Paramount (Exclusive)
Updated: Megan Colligan is out as head of worldwide marketing and distribution at Paramount Pictures, Variety has learned. The move comes as newly installed studio chief Jim Gianopulos continues to shake up the top executive ranks at the troubled company in the wake of a series of film flops such as “Ghost in the Shell” and “Baywatch.” Paramount’s latest bomb, “Suburbicon,” a dark satire from George Clooney, debuted to a dreadful $2.8 million. It has eked out $5.1 million in two weeks of release. In September, Gianopulos ousted Marc Evans, the motion picture group president, and replaced him with Wyck Godfrey, the producer of “The Fault in Our Stars” and “Twilight.”

In a memo to staff, Colligan thanked her colleagues for their “hard work, inspired talents and true professionalism.” She went on to write, “You are a team in every sense of the word. You never give up and never give in, no matter
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gurinder Chadha on “Viceroy’s House,” the Partiality of Historical Films, and “Bend It Like Beckham…

Gurinder Chadha on “Viceroy’s House,” the Partiality of Historical Films, and “Bend It Like Beckham”“Viceroy’s House”

Gurinder Chadha is a writer, director, and producer known for films like “Bend It Like Beckham,” “Bride & Prejudice,” and “It’s a Wonderful Afterlife.” Her newest movie, “Viceroy’s House,” is set in India during Partition. The movie follows the lives of the last Viceroy of India (Hugh Bonneville) and his family (Gillian Anderson, Lily Travers), as well the Indian citizens who work for them (Manish Dayal, Huma Qureishi, Om Puri).

We recently spoke to Chadha about “Viceroy’s House,” why the film feels so personal to her, and the uphill battle she faced as she tried to secure funding for “Bend It Like Beckham.”

“Viceroy’s House” premiered in the UK in March. It hits U.S. theaters this Friday, September 1.

This interview has been edited. It was transcribed by Kaidia Pickels.

W&H: The story of “Viceroy’s House” is your personal history. It seems like you’ve been gearing up to this.

Gc: Yeah, it’s a big, sumptuous, British costume drama, which I’ve never done before. It’s quite a challenge. It took a lot of courage to actually go for it, because it’s about such a tumultuous period in our history, and also I’m challenging the British Empire and its version of history. I was a bit intimidated, obviously, because that’s 200 years of British rule.

I think I had to tell the story because it was my personal story, and I had come across evidence that showed that the history that I’d been taught in school — the British Empire’s version of Indian independence — was wrong. I closed my eyes and just went for it. I think having children and being a mother made me feel, like, “You’ve got to go for it and tell your story.”

As women, we don’t get to tell those kind of big, epic stories. A million people died during the partition of India and Indian independence and 14 million people became refugees overnight, but most people in the world don’t even know that that happened. I think that what’s really important is to stress how being a woman and being a mother, as a director, really influenced how I chose to tell that story.

W&H: Can you elaborate on that?

Gc: So, for example, it was a very violent period. Normally people who know about partition talk about the violence a lot, and what happened to ordinary people — neighbors turning on neighbors, a lot of fights between Hindus and Muslims and Sikhs. I went to investigate this and found that a lot of it was not the case — it was instigated violence. It was militia, it was organized. It was men leaving the army and keeping their weapons, and using them.

I didn’t want to recreate scenes and spend thousands of dollars to show Muslims killing Hindus and vice versa. I chose a way to tell the story using archival footage, and sometimes I recreated scenes with my actors that looked like archival footage. I considered an empathetic approach to violence as opposed to glorifying the violence.

W&H: Which is what we probably wouldn’t have seen from a male director.

Gc: I think so, I wouldn’t say I’m 100 percent sure but I think it would’ve been an easy thing to show rioting and people killing each other in a film about partition, but it was a conscious decision on my part to not do that. What I’m interested in now is the response of women to the film. Women will respond often quite differently to men in that women just understand it, and understand the emotional choices that I’ve made in telling the story, whereas often men will want to get caught up in and challenge the historical minutiae. Women, they sort of get it.

W&H: Meanwhile, most movies about historical details take license with them.

Gc: Well, you have to, otherwise you’d make a documentary. History is so partial! How I interpret my history is different to you. As a British person, I’m sitting here in the U.S., which is a former colony. Americans were the “bad guys” and the Brits should’ve had America — that just sounds so ludicrous now, but I’m sure there are people in Britain who think like that.

In India, in 1857, you had a lot of soldiers who mutinied. In British history books it’s called the “Great Indian Mutiny of 1857.” In Indian history books it’s called the “First War of Independence.”

W&H: This feels like a much bigger movie for you.

Gc: Yes, it’s a bigger budget, it’s epic in its scope, and also it’s very resonant with today, even though it’s set 70 years ago. It’s talking about how politicians use hate in order to divide us and get what they need and want. That has tremendous lessons for today.

When we started writing the film, the world was a different place. Barack Obama was the U.S. president, there was no Brexit, and there was no Syrian refugee crisis. During the writing and the making of the film, the world really changed. That has really affected how I’ve told the story.

W&H: It took you and Paul [Mayeda Berges] about a decade to get the film written, and then you brought in Moira [Buffini]. Why did you bring in a third voice?

Gc: There came a point where I felt that I was very close to the story, and so I appreciated Moira’s distance. She was able to come in and say, “I know why this is emotionally important, so let’s look at the scene like this,” or “I believe this, but I don’t believe this.” Also, in terms of dialogue, I’ve never really written period dialogue before. I’ve got an ear for it from what I’ve seen, but she was very good at some of the dialogue as well.

W&H: In India, the film is called “Partition 1947,” but Pakistan has banned the movie.

Gc: The film is also released in English in India as “Viceroy’s House.” I made the film as “Viceroy’s House,” and that’s the film that’s being seen around the world. However, when the Indian distributors saw the film, they felt very strongly that it had a much bigger audience in India than the English version would reach, so they wanted to dub it in Hindi. They’d actually done that before, “Bend It Like Beckham” was dubbed in Hindi as well, as was “Bride & Prejudice.” There was a history of my movies being dubbed because they feature Indians, and they feel like an Indian audience will prefer the Hindi version.

It’s interesting because it’s about the audiences. What’s been interesting about India is that some people just don’t want to go there, because Partition is such a hard subject. Others will — one Indian external affairs minister held a screening and tweeted about the film and went on television to say, “Every Indian should watch this film.”

I was surprised that the government of Pakistan picked up on the film like it has. The ban in Pakistan was obviously a big story in India. I, for one, was saddened by the ban. However, a lot of British-Pakistanis saw the film and appreciated it in Britain and I dare say here in America, too, I’m glad that American-Pakistanis have the opportunity to see the film.

It’s all about history. I talk about history from a British, female, Indian perspective, and I make it very clear that this is my perspective of history. Obviously in Pakistan they don’t want to hear what I have to say about how my family suffered for the birth of their country. They’ve spent 70 years building their own version of how their country came to be, and they don’t really want to dwell on the plight of my family. I understand it, I’m not cross about it.

It’s a funny thing. Maybe it’s because I’m a mom, but if anybody criticizes the film, I just say “What are you gonna do?” It’s history — it’s my version. People aren’t used to people like me making big statements about the world and what happened, the geopolitics of what happened then and how it’s resonating today in that area of the world.

I’m sure a lot of it is also because I’m a woman — “how dare she.” I feel quite powerful, because I got to tell my story.

W&H: America is a country where it is opening that doesn’t have a relationship to the occurrences in the film. What are your thoughts on American audiences?

Gc: Well, you say that it doesn’t have a relationship, but when you see the film, you’ll realize that America did have a relationship, because it was the beginning of the Cold War. The top-secret documents that are featured in the film come from a book that part of the story is based on. The author of that book spent a lot of time at the American archives in Washington, looking at the letters between President Roosevelt and Winston Churchill discussing India and the future of Asia, and what would happen if Britain handed India back.

America was very vociferous during the war toward Churchill, saying “You’ve got to give India her independence.” The Japanese had taken southeast Asia at that point, and Roosevelt and the Americans said, “If you don’t commit to giving India her independence, you’re asking them to open their arms out to the Japanese,” and everyone was afraid of that. Also, the Allies needed their troops. A deal was struck during the war that would grant India independence after the war, so India became part of the Allied forces.

However, in 1945, after the war, there was a panic. The thought was, “If we hand India back, what’s going to happen to us in Asia?” Of course, the Soviets were expanding. So America was involved in some ways!

W&H: You recently told me a story about how “Bend It Like Beckham” almost didn’t get funding. Can you tell that story again?

Gc: Every film I’ve made, I’ve always had to fight for it. Every time I choose to make a film that has Indians in it, or people of color — particularly women — suddenly, everyone goes, “Uh, it ain’t commercial. It’s niche.” Even though I’ve proved it financially, you know?

I’d been working on the “Bend It Like Beckham” script for about three years, and loads of people had passed on it: BBC, Channel 4, all the usual distributors. Everyone said, “Oh, it’s too niche. No one’s going to want to go and see a film about an Indian girl who plays football.” I was getting more and more agitated about it because I’d thought this was really going to work. There was something in this film that made me think, “Oh my god, there’s something here that’s going to work.” I was really dejected. I was almost going to give up, actually, but I’d submitted it to the UK Film Council, who were giving grants to British filmmakers.

I was waiting to hear the results, and someone who was on this panel had told me that they’re going to reject it because a reader wrote in a report that they should pass on the film because “we’re never going to find a girl who can bend it like David Beckham.” I just thought, what does this guy think, that Harrison Ford actually jumps out of helicopters? I was absolutely furious.

I called the new head of the new council at that time, John Woodward. I said, “This is outrageous! How dare this guy say this, and how dare you all listen! I’m fed up with you all putting me on panels to do with diversity and filmmaking, and having me bleating on about how hard it is for me as an Indian woman to make films and here I am with a project that I think is really commercial and you’re not supporting me!” John told me to calm down and come meet with him and talk about it. He said “Yes, that is a very stupid thing for that guy to say, but hold on a minute. You are one of our few female filmmakers of color, and we need to support you. Here’s what you’ve got to do.” In that reader’s report there were a couple of other script points. John asked me to take care of those, and he said he’d put the project through in the next round when he’s took over.

I said, “Fuck that, I don’t believe you. What are these notes?” I got the notes, went home on a Friday, rewrote those particular scenes, and on Monday morning, I handed the script back to John. That committee was meeting that week. He took my script, he went down to that committee, and he said, “I don’t care what you fun, but you have to fund this one. We have to support her.” They gave me a green light, I got a million pounds, and then everyone else started coming in because I had some money. That’s how “Bend It Like Beckham” got made.

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Gurinder Chadha on “Viceroy’s House,” the Partiality of Historical Films, and “Bend It Like Beckham… was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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‘Viceroy’s House’ Review: Whites Are Burdened, Indians Contrived in Colonial Drama

‘Viceroy’s House’ Review: Whites Are Burdened, Indians Contrived in Colonial Drama
The very premise of “Viceroy’s House” invites cynicism. Set during the 1947 Partition of India, in which the reluctantly departing British colonial rulers cleaved the subcontinent into India and Pakistan, the period drama focuses on the good intentions and imperial beauty of the English leadership’s last few months. Historians estimate that the Partition led to between 200,000 and 2 million dead, as well as between 10 million and 20 million displaced. But director Gurinder Chadha (“It’s a Wonderful Afterlife,” “Bend It Like Beckham”) attempts to explore the cataclysmic human costs of the Partition without humanizing any of the Indian...
See full article at The Wrap »

As ‘Patti Cake$’ Stumbles, Fox Searchlight Faces a Battle To Remain on Top

As ‘Patti Cake$’ Stumbles, Fox Searchlight Faces a Battle To Remain on Top
Standing before the packed house at Manhattan’s Metrograph Theater, “Patti Cake$” director Geremy Jasper introduced his film. He was excited, in the way that first-time directors often are at their premieres, thanking his producers, his cast, his reps — but the most heartfelt thanks went to distributor Fox Searchlight. Not only did it make his Jersey girl-rapper tale one of the biggest buys of the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, but it also represented a genuine dream come true. When the “Patti Cake$” team imagined their ideal distributor, he said, they agreed that nothing could be better than becoming a Fox Searchlight movie.

Headstones in the graveyard of studio specialty divisions include Warner Independent, Picturehouse, Fine Line Features, Paramount Classics, Paramount Vantage, and beyond. However, Fox Searchlight has persevered, and succeeded, for more than 20 years: Savvy, innovative, and astute, it’s known for its skill in finding acquisitions that reached audiences beyond the arthouse.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

As ‘Patti Cake$’ Stumbles, Fox Searchlight Faces a Battle To Remain on Top

As ‘Patti Cake$’ Stumbles, Fox Searchlight Faces a Battle To Remain on Top
Standing before the packed house at Manhattan’s Metrograph Theater, “Patti Cake$” director Geremy Jasper introduced his film. He was excited, in the way that first-time directors often are at their premieres, thanking his producers, his cast, his reps — but the most heartfelt thanks went to distributor Fox Searchlight. Not only did it make his Jersey girl-rapper tale one of the biggest buys of the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, but it also represented a genuine dream come true. When the “Patti Cake$” team imagined their ideal distributor, he said, they agreed that nothing could be better than becoming a Fox Searchlight movie.

Headstones in the graveyard of studio specialty divisions include Warner Independent, Picturehouse, Fine Line Features, Paramount Classics, Paramount Vantage, and beyond. However, Fox Searchlight has persevered, and succeeded, for more than 20 years: Savvy, innovative, and astute, it’s known for its skill in finding acquisitions that reached audiences beyond the arthouse.
See full article at Indiewire »

Just 4 Women-Directed Films Included in BBC’s 100 Greatest Comedies List

Amy Heckerling’s “Clueless” is one of the four women-directed films on the list

BBC Culture recently asked 253 film critics (118 women and 135 men) to identify their top 10 favorite comedies. “We urged the experts to go with their heart and pick personal favorites,” the source emphasized. “Films that are part of their lives.” After crunching the numbers and identifying the most popular selections, BBC Culture published a list called The 100 Greatest Comedies of All Time — and only four female-directed films made the cut.

Elaine May’s “A New Leaf” came in at number 90. The 1971 film follows a newly poor playboy (Walter Matthau) who decides to marry and murder a rich woman (May) to regain his wealth. At number 89 is Vera Chytilová’s 1966 film “Daisies,” about two teen pranksters (Jitka Cerhová and Ivana Karbanová).

Maren Ade’s award-winning “Toni Erdmann” placed at number 59. Last year’s hit traces the strained but loving relationship between an ambitious career woman (Sandra Hüller) and her practical joker father (Peter Simonischek). Finally, Amy Heckerling’s “Clueless” came in at number 34. The 1995 Beverly Hills-set film stars Alicia Silverstone as a rich queen bee trying to use her “popularity for a good cause.”

None of those films cracked the top 30 and only “Toni Erdmann” was released in the past 20 years. The severe lack of women is even more frustrating since many of the male directors — like Billy Wilder, Howard Hawks, Rob Reiner, and Wes Anderson — hold multiple spots on the list.

While BBC Culture didn’t provide specific criteria for what constitutes a comedy — they left that up to the critics to determine — it would have been nice to see a classic like Penny Marshall’s “Big” be included. The 1988 body swap comedy not only stars Tom Hanks in an Oscar-nominated performance, it serves as inspiration for everything from “13 Going on 30” to episodes of shows like “The Mindy Project.”

It also would have been great to see comedies that present oft-ignored stories be recognized. Nancy Meyers’ “Something’s Gotta Give” is a sexually frank rom-com about people over 50. Rachel Tunnard’s “Adult Life Skills” is about a young woman who isn’t really interested in anything but making movies that star her thumbs. Gillian Robespierre’s “Obvious Child” presents abortion as just one small part of a struggling comedian’s life. And Gurinder Chadha’s “Bend It Like Beckham” sees its heroine stuck in a culture clash between her Sikh family and her love of sports.

The inclusion of only four women in The 100 Greatest Comedies points to the (historic and present) lack of opportunity for female directors. An Mdsc Initiative study from earlier this year evaluated the 1,114 directors on the last decade’s top-grossing films and found that only four percent were female (Four really seems to be the not-so-magic number). The report concluded that there had been “no meaningful change in the prevalence of female directors” on top films. The 100 Greatest Comedies of All Time list makes that lack of progress very clear.

Just 4 Women-Directed Films Included in BBC’s 100 Greatest Comedies List was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

India’s Partition: The Forgotten Story review – Gurinder Chadha attempts to pin down a complex story

The film-maker’s short and personal investigation cannot begin to cover the necessary ground to make convincing arguments for how the partition of India came to be

Bend It Like Beckham director Gurinder Chadha faced some criticism when her most recent film, Viceroy’s House, was released in March. It told the story of Indian partition, set in and around the palace of the final viceroy, Lord Mountbatten, partly, Chadha has said, to ensure this chapter of history was remembered in Britain. But the film’s version of that historical divide was controversial. In this paper, the writer Fatima Bhutto called it a “servile pantomime of partition”, while Ian Jack wrote that the film takes “a breathtaking liberty with the historical record”. Chadha was defensive, of course, and issued a firm denial of any perceived anti-Muslim bias, stating her sadness that “a film about reconciliation should be so wilfully misrepresented
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

10 Female-Directed Films to See This Season, From ‘Lady Bird’ to ‘Professor Marston & the Wonder Women’

10 Female-Directed Films to See This Season, From ‘Lady Bird’ to ‘Professor Marston & the Wonder Women’
All this week, IndieWire will be rolling out our annual Fall Preview, including the very best indie cinema has to offer, all the awards contenders you need to know about, and even blockbuster fare that seems poised to please the most discerning tastes, all with an eye towards introducing you to all the new movies you need to get through a jam-packed fall movie-going season. Check back every day for a new look at the best the season has to offer, and clear your schedule, because we’re going to fill it right up.

Finally: 10 new features from female filmmakers. From first-time directors to bonafide superstars, personal stories to historical epics, this season has something for everyone, and all from women.

“Viceroy’s House” (September 1)

After investigating her own heritage during the filming of an episode of BBC’s “Who Do You Think You Are?,” “Bend It Like Beckham” filmmaker
See full article at Indiewire »

Gurinder Chadha’s Viceroy’S House Us release In Theaters & On Demand September 1st

Award-winning director Gurinder Chadha explores the end of colonial rule in India with her latest motion picture Viceroy’S House which releases in the U.S. on Friday, September 1, playing in select theaters and also on-demand nationwide. Huma Qureshi, Manish Dayal, Om Puri, Gillian Anderson, and Hugh Bonneville head up the all-star cast and Oscar winner A.R. Rahman provides the music. The new Us poster and trailer have premiered for this acclaimed motion picture event.

Watch the new Viceroy’S House trailer here:

New nations are rarely born in peace… India, 1947: Lord Mountbatten (Downton Abbey’s Hugh Bonneville) is dispatched, along with his wife Edwina (Gillian Anderson), to New Delhi to oversee the country’s transition from British rule to independence. Taking his place in the resplendent mansion known as the Viceroy’s House, Mountbatten arrives hopeful for a peaceful transference of power. But ending centuries of colonial rule
See full article at Bollyspice »

Gurinder Chadha: “Partition:1947 is an eye opener and my chance to rewrite history”

Gurinder Chadha

Best known for her crossover films Bend It Like Beckham and Bride & Prejudice, director Gurinder Chadha is now bringing her latest outing Partition: 1947. The film has been in news since it brings to fore what truly transpired before the decision to divide India and Pakistan was taken back in 1947. While the film is releasing on the 70th anniversary of India’s independence from the British and arrives on 18th August, the makers are now shying away from declaring loud and clear that there was a big international conspiracy (and not the infighting between the Indians) that led to the decision of partition.

We get into a chat with the filmmaker.

It is a pleasure to be in touch, Gurinder. It has been a long gap of seven years between your last release It’s a Wonderful Afterlife and now Partition: 1947. You must not have bargained for that, isn’t it?
See full article at Bollyspice »

Kelsey Grammer To Lead London Production Of ‘Big Fish: The Musical’

Actor Kelsey Grammer is to lead the cast of a new West End production of Big Fish: The Musical. Based on the novel Big Fish by Daniel Wallace and the Columbia Pictures film screenplay by John August, this new production will be the London premiere of the musical and also marks Kelsey’s first time on the London stage.

Directed by Nigel Harman, Big Fish: The Musical will play at The Other Palace from Wednesday 1 November 2017 – Sunday 31 December 2017. Tickets go on sale on 31st July 2017.

The Other Palace opened in February 2017 as a home for musical theatre. Discovering, developing and reimagining musicals is at the heart of what The Other Palace is about. The spaces are used to nurture the next generation of musicals, and the creatives behind them; celebrating the very best of the art form, from the established to the brand new.

Kelsey Grammer played the role of Dr.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Sarah DeLappe’s “The Wolves” to Make Off-Broadway Return This Fall

“The Wolves”: ThePlaywrightsRealm/YouTube

Listen up, “Bend it Like Beckham” fans: If you’re in New York City this fall, you may be able to catch “The Wolves,” an all-too-rare story about female athletes. According to Playbill, Sarah DeLappe’s play is making its Off-Broadway return. The finalist for the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Drama centers on a suburban high school’s girls’ soccer team.

Originally produced last year at The Duke on 42nd Street by The Playwrights Realm in association with New York Stage & Film and Vassar’s Powerhouse Theatre season, “The Wolves” is directed by Lila Neugebauer, a former soccer player. “The opportunity to be both a coach and director at one time has been the apotheosis of my hopes and dreams,” she has said.

Previews are scheduled to kick off Lincoln Center Theater’s Mitzi Newhouse Theater November 1. Original cast members Tedra Millan, Sarah Mezzanotte, Mia Barron, Brenna Coates, Jenna Dioguardi, Samia Finnerty, Midori Francis, Lizzy Jutila, and Susannah Perkins will return for the upcoming run with more casting details to be announced.

A number of women will be working in key positions behind the scenes. “The production will feature scenic design by Laura Jellinek, costume design by Ásta Bennie Hostetter, [and] lighting design by Lap Chi Chu,” Playbill reports.

“I didn’t intend [‘The Wolves’] to be a political statement,” DeLappe has shared. “I was just trying to write these women as authentically and truthfully as possible — which I guess is a political act.” Whatever her intention for the play, it’s clearly struck a chord with both critics and audiences. “The production won an Obie Ensemble Award — for Neugebauer and the acting ensemble — and a Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Ensemble. The play received nominations for the the Lucille Lortel Award, the Drama League Award, and the Outer Critics’ Circle Award,” Playbill writes. And it’s already set to receive productions at the Goodman Theatre, Studio Theatre, Marin Theatre Company, Lyric Stage Company, and Hyde Park Theatre.

Sarah DeLappe’s “The Wolves” to Make Off-Broadway Return This Fall was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Female Fight film Brawl set to Kick-Ass in 2018

  • ShockYa
Female Fight film Brawl set to Kick-Ass in 2018
The hard hitting thriller currently in development has some big names already attached in Mem Ferda (London Heist), Amy Tyger (Legacy), Shanika Warren-Markland (Brotherhood), Olivia Chenery (Queens), Pooja Shah (Bend it like Beckham) and Monika Miles (War Games). Brawl stars Amy Tyger (Legacy) as Beki Knight, a fighter unable to get a licence because of […]

The post Female Fight film Brawl set to Kick-Ass in 2018 appeared first on Shockya.com.
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Ladies of the London Underworld Brawl in Upcoming Thriller

Kick-Ass Female Fight film Brawl is set for 2018. Set in London’s dark underworld of illegal fight clubs ,Brawl is a hard hitting thriller in development that has some big UK names already attached in Mem Ferda (London Heist), Amy Tyger (Legacy), Shanika Warren-Markland (Brotherhood), Olivia Chenery (Queens), Pooja Shah (Bend it like Beckham) and Monika Miles (War Games).

Brawl stars Amy Tyger (Legacy) as Beki Knight, a fighter unable to get a licence because of a health issue, who joins an illegal fight club in order to get [Continued ...]
See full article at QuietEarth »

Ar Rahman shortlisted for one more prestigious award

Viceroy's House is a British-Indian historical film directed by Gurinder Chadha who had earlier made films like Bend it like Beckham and Bride and Prejudice. Viceroy’s House features Hugh Bonneville, Gillian Anderson, Manish Dayal, Huma Qureshi, and Michael Gambon. Ar Rahman is the music composer of the film which was released in the United Kingdom earlier in the year.

Now, for the latest buzz, Rahman’s soundtracks for the film have been shortlisted for the 2017 World Soundtrack Public Choice Award. Sharing this news in his social media page, Rahman says, “Delighted to be shortlisted for the World Soundtrack Awards...
See full article at Behindwoods »

Akshay jumps and Bhumi weaves her magic in ‘Bakehda’ from Toilet: Ek Prem Katha

What do you do if you have a song to finish off filming but you’re running late for an important meeting? You jump! Superstar Akshay Kumar found himself exactly in that situation whilst filming the song ‘Bakheda’ for his upcoming film ‘Toilet: Ek Prem Katha’, slated to release on 11th August 2017.

Reports have emerged of the heroics displayed by the star who left the film crew awestruck on the spot. As the megastar Akshay Kumar had just 10 minutes to shoot before leaving for his meetings, the sequence involved the actor having to jump from balconies. Sensing the delay at the spot, the superstar made the impulsive decision to perform the stunt himself without a safety harness, much to the surprise of the cast and the crew. The actor not only performed the dangerous stunt in a single take, he even taunted the cast and the crew by hanging on
See full article at Bollyspice »
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