Bamboozled (2000) - News Poster

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Sammy Davis Jr. ‘I’ve Gotta Be Me’

Sammy Davis Jr. ‘I’ve Gotta Be Me’
Premiering at Tiff 2017, Sammy Davis, Jr.: I’ve Gotta Be Me is the first major film documentary to examine Davis’ vast talent and his journey for identity through the shifting tides of civil rights and racial progress during 20th-century America.

Today Sammy Davis is seen primarily as part of The Rat Pack. That quartet of bad boys who sing and joke around is very much a part of time when Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin were the kings of the Las Vegas scene.

But Sammy Davis Jr. was much more than that and merely by lending his black face to that group makes The Rat Pack seem like a liberal if slightly dissolute, but a filled-with-fun group. In truth, his position with Sinatra, Martin, Peter Lawford was not all that comfortable and the path Davis had already trod before landing there was not a simple or easy one.

He
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Dear Hollywood: 9 Top Women Cinematographers Who Are Ready to Direct

  • Indiewire
Dear Hollywood: 9 Top Women Cinematographers Who Are Ready to Direct
Here’s how studios say they see it: Sure, we really want to hire women directors. But there’s almost no studio movie that isn’t big budget, and we can’t find women who have the experience necessary to handle the really big movies. (Never mind Colin Trevorrow. Or Marc Webb. Or Gareth Edwards. Or Jon Watts.)

Of course, that logic is a vicious cycle at best, but here’s a chance to break it. Director Reed Morano’s dazzling execution of the first three episodes of Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” suggests another excellent source for future women directors: top cinematographers.

Read More: 7 Female Genre Filmmakers You Should Get to Know Right Now

Women cinematographers work harder, longer, and have to be gifted and tough in order to keep landing jobs. As a cinematographer, make one mistake and you’re through. Any working cinematographer has more than
See full article at Indiewire »

Dear Hollywood: 9 Top Women Cinematographers Who Are Ready to Direct

Dear Hollywood: 9 Top Women Cinematographers Who Are Ready to Direct
Here’s how studios say they see it: Sure, we really want to hire women directors. But there’s almost no studio movie that isn’t big budget, and we can’t find women who have the experience necessary to handle the really big movies. (Never mind Colin Trevorrow. Or Marc Webb. Or Gareth Edwards. Or Jon Watts.)

Of course, that logic is a vicious cycle at best, but here’s a chance to break it. Director Reed Morano’s dazzling execution of the first three episodes of Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” suggests another excellent source for future women directors: top cinematographers.

Read More: 7 Female Genre Filmmakers You Should Get to Know Right Now

Women cinematographers work harder, longer, and have to be gifted and tough in order to keep landing jobs. As a cinematographer, make one mistake and you’re through. Any working cinematographer has more than
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Netflix Orders Series From Spike Lee Based On His Film She’S Gotta Have It

  • LRM Online
Today’s modern television culture has opened the floodgates for all sorts of creatives. In the past, TV was a medium that was oftentimes creatively constricting, and as such, many auteurs stuck to film, where their visions could flourish. The past decade has seen a definite shift away from episodic storytelling to more serialized content — content that could exist in an ongoing format or as a limited series.

This has attracted a good number of filmmakers and actors to the medium, who see unique opportunities. The latest filmmaker to make the jump from film to TV is Spike Lee, the director of such films as Malcolm X, Do the Right Thing, Inside Man, Bamboozled, and He Got Game. Now, according to Deadline, Netflix has just ordered a series from Spike Lee. The project: 10-episode re-imagining of Lee’s 1986 breakout film She’s Gotta Have It.

Here's what the outlet said
See full article at LRM Online »

Recommended New Books on Filmmaking: ‘The Force Awakens,’ Spike Lee, ‘Alien,’ Pixar, and More

  • The Film Stage
Force Awakens fever is still gripping the film industry two months after the release of the seventh Star Wars entry, and the world of cinema-centric books is just as Snoke-obsessed. But there’s plenty more worth snagging, including in-depth analyses of Pixar and Spike Lee’s Bamboozled, a lavish study of musicals, and a graphic stunner called Filmish.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens Visual Dictionary by Pablo Hidalgo (Dk Publishing)

Dk’s Star Wars visual dictionaries are, quite simply, must-owns. (Even the three prequel editions are fascinating.) And the Force Awakens Visual Dictionary might be the best yet. Author Pablo Hidalgo goes deep, providing everything you wanted to know about Jakku (but were afraid to ask), offering insight on briefly seen characters like Max Von Sydow’s Lor San Tekka, and breaking down exactly why the “crossguard blades” of Kylo Ren’s lightsaber are a necessity. Plus, the film stills
See full article at The Film Stage »

Hey, Chris Rock: Here's How the Oscars Should Go

  • PEOPLE.com
Hey, Chris Rock: Here's How the Oscars Should Go
Dear Mr. Rock, As a movie journalist, I wouldn't normally dream of telling a multimillionaire comedian how to do his job, but this one is too important. You're not just hosting the Oscars anymore, you're hosting #OscarsSoWhite. Since, pretty much by definition, you'll be the only black person sanctioned to be onstage, it's all on you, brother. Forget the fact that, as Wanda Sykes might say, white folks are lookin' at you. Far scarier is the realization that black folks are lookin' at you - and Asian-Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, et. al. The pressure does not get any greater. So
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Old Spike Lee Is Back with Biting Anti-Gun, Anti-Violence Satire

'Chi-Raq' with Teyonah Parris. 'Chi-Raq' movie review: The return of the Spike Lee of old The star of Spike Lee's Chi-Raq is an astounding young actress named Teyonah Parris (Dear White People); she plays Lysistrata – the name of the titular character in Aristophanes' comedy from about 411 Bce. That Greek play is about one woman's attempt to end the Peloponnesian War (a messy thing involving Athenians and Spartans, among others) by soliciting all Athenian women to withhold sex until peace is negotiated. It would have been a damn good idea to end a war. It was a great idea for a play. And it is a wonderful concept for a satirical film set amongst the very wars being fought on the streets of Chicago and in so many other cities around the world, here on the planet of angry men and their powerful guns. Scary boyfriend and city The Lysistrata
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Chi-raq | Review

  • ioncinema
Sexual Healing: Spike Lee’s New Joint Aims to Anoint

Provocateur Spike Lee continues to fling his ambition into surprising experimental formats and narratives. Following the box office failure of his 2008 war drama Miracle at St. Anna, Lee has branched out inventively, though his feature narrative products have not often received the same level of critical acclaim elicited by his early titles from the late 80s and early 90s when he was a lone representative of black independent cinema at the art house. After funding 2012’s Red Hook Summer out of pocket and controversially trawling Kickstarter for 2014’s Da Sweet Blood of Jesus (a remake of Bill Gunn’s 1973 classic Ganja & Hess), he’s back with his grandest platform in quite some time with Chi-raq, so named for the controversial moniker Chicago has earned due to the astronomical urban violence plaguing the metropolis’ South Side. Assembling an impressive cast, including
See full article at ioncinema »

November Highlights Pt.1

If years were musicals we'd be about to hear  the 11th hour showstopping numbers before the climax in December when Oscar Fever and List Mania truly begins. Consider that in two days two of the best films of this already great year emerge in theaters: Carol, Mustang and then the Thanksgiving blockbusters hit. But for now some highlights from the month's first half since we don't want you to miss anything! We're illustrating with Slave Girl Princess Leia because we reject any corporate attempts to erase popular culture touchstones because people are so easily offended. Slave Girl Leia turned her chains into weapons and defeated the patriarchy Jabba the Hut and should be celebrated not covered up. 

Grey Gardens Manuel's HBO Lgbt retrospective season reached this eccentric gem

Female Directors diversity in director's chair is the hot topic of the year 

Charming Sir Ian at the Brit brunch party for
See full article at FilmExperience »

Watch: Spike Lee Addresses Critics with Second 'Chi-Raq' Trailer, as Amazon Studios Tries New Release Model

Watch: Spike Lee Addresses Critics with Second 'Chi-Raq' Trailer, as Amazon Studios Tries New Release Model
Amazon Studios' first original movie release, Spike Lee's "Chi-Raq," is officially hitting theaters December 4, via Roadside Attractions and Lionsgate. But the first trailer (see below), as Shadow and Act reports, drew criticism in some quarters from those who claim the director's adaptation of "Lysistrata" trivializes the violence that continues to plague Chicago. (Not knowing Aristophanes' anti-war play could surely lead to some misunderstandings.) Now, Lee is out with a second trailer, which he prefaces by saying, "'Chi-Raq' is not a comedy. 'Chi-Raq' is a satire... In no way, shape, or form are we not respectful of the situation that is happening in 'Chi-Raq.'" As with "Do the Right Thing" and "Bamboozled," Lee's latest is almost sure to be divisive, though this is, notably, also the vein in which the filmmaker has produced much of his most lasting and essential works. The film
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Daily | Lynch, Franju, French

  • Keyframe
In today's roundup: Praise for Criterion's release of David Lynch's Mulholland Dr., revisiting Georges Franju's Eyes Without a Face and Spike Lee's Bamboozled, The Babadook and It Follows as harbingers of a new wave of horror, Arthur Freed as the true "author" of Meet Me in St. Louis, Terry Gilliam's memoir, the career of Geraldine Page, chats with Agnès Varda and Catherine Hardwicke, art work by The Wolfpack boys, remembering film critic Philip French—and Patricia Arquette has joined Robert Pattinson and Mia Goth in the cast of Claire Denis’s as-yet-untitled science fiction project, written by Zadie Smith her husband, Nick Laird. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

All hail, Cookie! Empire's leading lady is part of the female antihero antidote

Empire’s matriarch heads new breed of acerbic, exciting and original female leads blowing away Don Draper, Walter White and Tony Soprano’s gloomy presence

With the end of Mad Men this summer, the melancholy and self-destruction that accompanied fictional male pro-/ antagonists like Don Draper, Walter White and any other main character mentioned in Brett Martin’s Difficult Men (a great read, thank you kindly) died as well, effectively making room for strong leading women who refuse to play second fiddle to another dude in crisis. Empire’s Cookie Lyon (Taraji P Henson), Scandal’s Olivia Pope, and Brooklyn Nine-Nine’s Rosa Diaz, Amy Santiago and Gina Linetti have risen up to offer us a reprieve from the winter of our (male-led) discontent. Now, in the words of Cookie herself, these women are taking what’s theirs. And through that, they’re offering us a pop culture palette cleanser
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Bamboozled: Spike Lee's masterpiece on race in America is as relevant as ever

On the 15th anniversary of the film’s release, critic Ashley Clark argues in an excerpt from his forthcoming book that the satire is frighteningly prescient, with its impact being seen from reality show Real Housewives to the Fox hit Empire

I first saw Bamboozled as a 15-year-old, in April 2001, at the Ritzy Cinema in Brixton, south-west London, and it threw me for a loop. Written and directed by Spike Lee, the film is an intense satire about a frustrated African American TV executive, Pierre Delacroix (Damon Wayans), who creates a contemporary version of a minstrel show in order to purposefully get himself fired, and expose the commissioning network as a racist and retrograde outfit. However, the show, which features its black stars wearing blackface, becomes a huge hit, prompting Delacroix’s mental collapse, and an explosion of catastrophic violence, the effects of which are felt far and wide.

Related:
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Michael Rapaport Calls Spike Lee a "S--- Stain" During Gentrification Feud

Michael Rapaport Calls Spike Lee a
A feud grows in Brooklyn! Michael Rapaport continued his ongoing gentrification battle with Spike Lee, calling the famous director a "s--- stain" on HuffPost Live Tuesday, July 22. The stars' public debate over the topic of Brooklyn's shifting population began in the spring when Rapaport slammed an epic rant delivered by Lee back in February. "Spike lives on the Upper East Side [in Manhattan]," Rapaport, who appeared in Lee's 2000 movie Bamboozled, sniffed of the director while appearing on HuffPost Live in April. "The majority of those [...]
See full article at Us Weekly »

Blu-ray Review: ‘Spike Lee Joint Collection’ Releases Are Solid Starting Point

Who of our modern filmmakers will justify lavish, career-spanning box sets in the next generation (presuming there is such a thing and we’re not 100% digital)? We’ve seen Oliver Stone, Martin Scorsese, and Alfred Hitchcock sets in recent years but who will get the same treatment in ten or twenty years?

One man who I’d love to see dissected from first film to last is the essential Spike Lee. He has had an undeniably spotty career with films both considered masterpieces and complete failures. But Spike is always working, always trying something new, always willing to challenge himself and the viewer. Did his “Oldboy” remake work? No. He picks himself up, dusts himself off, and gets back to it. Spike has been everywhere lately, promoting and discussing the 25th anniversary of his masterpiece, “Do the Right Thing,” and so someone figured it was a good time to release
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

On the digital legacy of Michael Mann's 'Collateral' nearly 10 years later

  • Hitfix
On the digital legacy of Michael Mann's 'Collateral' nearly 10 years later
If you're interested in an anniversary conversation that really has some bearing on today's film industry, I highly recommend American Cinematographer's recent chat with "Collateral" Dp Dion Beebe. It's been nearly a decade (if you can believe it) since Beebe and Paul Cameron carved out a serious place for digital with that film, earning an American Society of Cinematographers (Asc) nomination in the process. It got me thinking about the history of the industry's acceptance of digital as reflected in the nominations handed out by both the Asc and Academy's cinematography branch over the last 10 years. Academy members were a bit slower on the uptake, as you might recall. Beebe and Cameron were snubbed by the branch despite the Asc nomination. Of course, that was still a dicey time for the technology. The first feature films shot digitally were Lars Von Trier's "The Idiots" and Thomas Vinterberg's "The Celebration,
See full article at Hitfix »

Barack Obama, John Singleton and the Academy toast 'Do the Right Thing'

  • Hitfix
Barack Obama, John Singleton and the Academy toast 'Do the Right Thing'
Yes, another day, another anniversary. But this one is quite noteworthy. Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing" turns 25 on Monday. It is a film I first saw when I was young, but I wasn't at all ready for it. I saw it again in film school and noticed I had grown with it, but it still whipped up complex feelings (as only the best films can). I've revisited it a number of times over the years and come to cherish it as one of the greatest pieces of cinema ever conjured, but the Academy frankly seemed like it was holding its nose just to give it the two nominations it received a quarter century ago. Kim Basinger had the right idea when the night of the Oscars came. "The best film of the year is not even nominated [for Best Picture] and it's 'Do the Right Thing,'" the "Batman" star said,
See full article at Hitfix »

Spike Lee on ‘Da Sweet Blood of Jesus’ and Hollywood’s Diversity Problem

Spike Lee on ‘Da Sweet Blood of Jesus’ and Hollywood’s Diversity Problem
Spike Lee’s latest horror film, “Da Sweet Blood of Jesus,” is about a couple of bloodsuckers, but don’t call them vampires. “This is not a vampire story,” Lee says from his production offices in Brooklyn. “Vampires can’t go out in the day in the Fort Green Projects. This is about people who are addicted to blood.” His movie was inspired by 1974′s “Ganja & Hess,” directed by Bill Gunn, which Lee first saw in NYU film school. “Bill didn’t think it was a vampire movie either,” Lee says. “Once it was taken from him and recut, it was sold that way to capitalize on the success of ‘Blacula.’”

Lee’s project, which he co-wrote and produced, is probably best known as the one he pitched on KickStarter last year. He says he learned about the crowd-funding site from his students at Nyu, where he’s long taught film classes.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

12-Day Spike Lee Retrospective Coming To BAMcinématek (NYC) June 29 - July 10 (Includes Rare Screening Of 'Joe’s Bed-Stuy Barbershop: We Cut Heads')

  • ShadowAndAct
Just in time for the release of his mystery Kickstarter-funded joint, Da Sweet Blood Of Jesus, this summer, BAMcinématek in Brooklyn, New York will host a retrospective of Spike Lee's film, in a series titled "By Any Means Necessary: A Spike Lee Joints Retrospective" running from June 29 - July 10. It will probably be a good time for me to revisit my Spike Lee retro from a couple of years ago, during which I revisited what I called his *forgotten* films - essentially, those titles that rarely come up when conversations about favorite Spike Lee films are had - like Girl 6, She Hate Me, Bamboozled, and others.  I wonder if we'll ever see a Tyler Perry retrospective. He's directed about...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Spike Lee Teams Up With Eminem To Direct His Video For ‘Headlights’

  • The Playlist
Though he’s not really known for his music video work, Spike Lee has directed over a dozen music vids (they are listed on Wikipedia, fyi). Perhaps his most notable are the dual version of Michael Jackson’s “They Don't Care About Us” and Public Enemy's "Fight The Power" (in which he has a cameo at the end), but he has also directed videos by Prince (who scored all of "Girl 6"), Arrested Development, Bruce Horsnby, Branford Marsalis, Guru featuring Donald Byrd, Curtis Mayfield, Naughty by Nature and Fishbone, among others (the clip he did for the Crooklyn Dodgers uses his trademark dollyshot too). He also directed a clip for Mau Maus, the fake gangster rap band from “Bamboozled” that featured Mos Def. One thing Lee has shied away from in his career is lensing music videos for “booty and bitches” rap videos or aggro ganster rap with anti-conscious messages
See full article at The Playlist »
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