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Tim Roth interview: Tin Star, Reservoir Dogs, Twin Peaks

Louisa Mellor Sep 8, 2017

Tim Roth leads an excellent cast in unpredictable new Sky Atlantic revenge drama Tin Star, out now…

“It’s the disposal,” says Tim Roth. “The killing isn’t the problem, it’s the disposal that’s the problem. You run out of space.” The storage issues faced by serial killers aren’t something to which many of us will have devoted much thought. Roth has. Reassuringly, he’s had reason to thanks to his recent sinister role as real-life murderer Reg Christie in BBC drama Rillington Place. “Charming fella” he jokes.

See related 26 new UK TV shows to look out for Life On Mars: revisiting a terrific UK crime drama Line Of Duty series 4: creator Jed Mercurio interview

Roth is back on UK television on the other side of the law in new Sky Atlantic drama Tin Star, which has already been renewed for a second series.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Adrien Brody on His Ties to China and New Film ‘A Dog Named De Niro’ (Exclusive)

Adrien Brody on His Ties to China and New Film ‘A Dog Named De Niro’ (Exclusive)
Adrien Brody was feted Friday with a lifetime achievement award at the Locarno Film Festival, Europe’s preeminent indie event, where he sat down with Variety and talked about why his 2003 Oscar for “The Pianist” didn’t lead to as many big studio roles as could be expected. He also delved into his ties to China, where he is one of a handful of bankable Western stars; and was cagey about his upcoming roles in TV show “Peaky Blinders” and genre-bending picture “A Dog Named De Niro.” Excerpts.

Of your early films the one that stands out for me is “Bread and Roses” by Ken Loach, who was celebrated here in Locarno last year. It’s still timely, given that it’s about exploited Mexican workers in L.A. Can you talk to me a little about working with Loach. How did it happen?

I don’t recall the audition, but
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Karlovy Vary rewards Laverty and Loach by Richard Mowe - 2017-07-05 15:00:55

Ken Loach meets the fans outside the Grand Hotel Pupp at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival Photo: Film Servis Kviff Ken Loach and Paul Laverty received a rapturous welcome at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival Photo: Film Service Kviff Rarely can a film festival and two filmmakers seem such a perfect match as the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival with its egalitarian approach and a preoccupation with social issues and director Ken Loach and his writing collaborator Paul Laverty who share the same values.

The match was celebrated when Loach and Laverty (Cannes Palme d’Or winner I, Daniel Blake, Bread And Roses, The Wind That Shakes The Barley, Carla’s Song among many), were given an ecstatic welcome by audiences when they received Crystal Globes for Outstanding Contributions to World Cinema, while Land And Freedom and Sweet Sixteen were screened in a section that marked 30 Years of the European Film Academy.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Adrien Brody to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award at Locarno Film Festival

Adrien Brody to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award at Locarno Film Festival
Rome – Oscar-winning actor Adrien Brody will be feted by the Locarno Film Festival with its Leopard Club Award for lifetime achievement.

Brody is expected to make the trek to the prominent Swiss fest dedicated to indie and cutting-edge fare, where his tribute will include an Aug. 4 screening of Roman Polanski’s “The Pianist,” for which Brody won the Academy Award for best actor in 2003, in the lakeside town’s 8,000-seat Piazza Grande. There will also be a public conversation with the actor.

“Brody gained a lasting place in the collective imagination of the movie-going public when he played composer Wladyslaw Szpilman in ‘The Pianist’ (2002), and has since demonstrated his status as one of the most versatile of actors, appreciated by filmmakers in Hollywood and beyond,” the festival said in a statement. Brody won the Oscar when he was 29 years old.

He made his acting debut as a teenager in Francis Ford Coppola’s “New York Stories” (1989) and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Exclusive: Writer Paul Laverty on his creative process on The Olive Tree

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Andy Furlong

This week HeyUGuys caught up with talented screenwriter Paul Laverty, the man who gave life to so many memorable characters and stories. In an extremely fascinating interview Paul talks about the latest film he wrote, The Olive Tree, directed by Icíar Bollaín. He also talks in depth about his creative process, what it is like working with Ken Loach, and Irish History.

One of things I have always appreciated about your writing is that it often has undertones of very socially relevant themes, such as the environment, poverty and recession – as indeed we see in The Olive Tree – but your characters never feel like just mouth pieces for these issues but rather fully fleshed out, real people that, through the audiences observation, become a window into these problems. How do you strike a balance between the themes you want to talk about in an overarching sense, without
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Films For Labor Day Weekend

Labor Day celebrates working people and the labor unions that brought working people the 40-hour work week, the 8-hour day, overtime pay, work-place safety, paid holidays and vacations, and a host of other protections and benefits. To honor those hard-working people and organized labor, here is a list (in no particular order) of a dozen worthy narrative films for Labor Day.

Norma Rae (1979)

For many people, the words “labor union” bring to mind the image of Sally Field standing up in defiance in “Norma Rae.” Field won an Oscar for her unforgettable, inspiring character, a worker in a Southern textile factory who becomes involved in labor organizing and stands up to management after the factory workers’ health is threatened in the workplace. This stirring drama, based on a true story, also stars Beau Bridges as Norma Rae’s husband Sonny and Ron Leibman as an union organizer from the Northeast.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

50 brilliant independent bookshops in the UK

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We're celebrating 50 brilliant UK independent bookshops. If your favourite is missing, please add it to the list below...

In Neil Gaiman’s preface to Shelf Life: Fantastic Stories Celebrating Bookstores, he describes four bookshops from his childhood. One was a travelling school shop, one a local store staffed by a helpful hippy where he’d pick up 25p Tom Disch novels, another was a bus ride away and owned by a Grinch who’d glower at schoolchildren customers, and the last was a now-defunct Soho sci-fi and fantasy treasure trove. Four individual shops run by booksellers with distinct personalities and idiosyncratic tastes. All of which made Gaiman what he is.

That’s the joy of independent bookshops. Their personalities shape those of the people who visit them. They’re not homogenous. Their stock tends to reflect their passions rather than the year's best-performing unit-shifters. And their
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Pride’ Review: Gay Activists, Striking Miners Unite to Fight the Power

  • The Wrap
‘Pride’ Review: Gay Activists, Striking Miners Unite to Fight the Power
In the opening moments of “Pride,” activist Mark (Ben Schnetzer) makes the case at the 1984 London Gay Pride parade that the Lgbt community and the coal miners on strike, seemingly disparate, actually share common enemies: Margaret Thatcher, the police and the tabloid press. The movie never says so explicitly, but it also suggests that the two groups share a love for a good anthem, and the most powerful moments of “Pride” revolve around music, whether it's a roomful of strike supporters singing “Bread and Roses,” Bronski Beat performing “Why?” at a benefit concert, or Billy Bragg's stirring rendition of.
See full article at The Wrap »

Jimmy's Hall likely Ken Loach's last feature

  • ScreenDaily
Jimmy's Hall likely Ken Loach's last feature
Exclusive: Jimmy’s Hall, which has begun shooting in Ireland, is likely to be Ken Loach’s last narrative feature - but he will continue to direct documentaries.

Ken Loach’s upcoming drama, Jimmy’s Hall, will likely be his last, according to regular producer Rebecca O’Brien.

“This is probably the last narrative feature for Ken,” O’Brien told ScreenDaily. “There are a few documentary ideas kicking around, and that will probably be the way to go, but this is a serious period-drama with a lot of moving parts so it’s a big thing to put together. I think we should go out while we’re on top.”

O’Brien, who has produced more than a dozen features with Loach since 1990, said that the 77 year-old director is likely to continue to make documentaries and TV work but that he is “unlikely” to make another narrative feature.

“It’s such a huge operation and Ken doesn
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Jimmy's Hall likely to be Ken Loach's last feature

  • ScreenDaily
Jimmy's Hall likely to be Ken Loach's last feature
Exclusive: Jimmy’s Hall, which has begun shooting in Ireland, is likely to be Ken Loach’s last narrative feature - but he will continue to direct documentaries.

Ken Loach’s upcoming drama, Jimmy’s Hall, will likely be his last, according to regular producer Rebecca O’Brien.

“This is probably the last narrative feature for Ken,” O’Brien told ScreenDaily. “There are a few documentary ideas kicking around, and that will probably be the way to go, but this is a serious period-drama with a lot of interconnecting elements so it’s a big thing to put together. I think we should go out while we’re on top.”

O’Brien, who has produced more than a dozen features with Loach since 1990, said that the 77 year-old director is likely to continue to make documentaries and TV work but that he is “unlikely” to make another narrative feature.

“It’s such a huge operation and Ken doesn
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes 2013: The Golden Cage (La Jaula de Oro) – review

Three Guatemalan teenagers' attempts to cross the murderous Mexico-us border region makes for gripping viewing

Even when Ken Loach doesn't have a film in competition in Cannes, his influence is still keenly felt. Spanish director Diego Quemada-Diez was a camera assistant on Loach's Carla's Song, Land and Freedom and Bread and Roses, and there is something very Loachian in this tough, absorbing, suspenseful drama showing in the Un Certain Regard section about three Guatemalan kids trying illegally to cross the Mexican border into the Us.

He has avowedly stuck to Loach's realist directing style: shooting in narrative sequence and using a semi-improvisatory approach on location. It is interesting that while British directors such as Andrea Arnold and Clio Barnard have hyper-evolved the Loach idiom into beautifully realised and photographed dramas of naturalism, Quemada-Diez is arguably closer to the gritty, grainy original.

The title comes from a Mexican ballad, Jaula de Oro,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'The Angels' Share' Review: Ken Loach Pours Engaging Shot of Scotch

  • The Wrap
'The Angels' Share' Review: Ken Loach Pours Engaging Shot of Scotch
Ken Loach, the 76-year old, British filmmaker best known for his bleak political dramas such as "The Wind that Shakes the Barley," "Bread and Roses" and "Ladybird Ladybird," has with "The Angels' Share" made a wee, entertaining comedy about the theft of high-priced scotch in Scotland. Like most Loach films, it starts out focused on those barely clinging to the bottom rung of the social ladder, this time in Glasgow. Robbie (newcomer Paul Brannigan), a skinny runt of a young man, is up before a judge who'll decide whether he goes
See full article at The Wrap »

'The Angels' Share' Review: Ken Loach Pours Engaging Shot of Scotch

  • The Wrap
'The Angels' Share' Review: Ken Loach Pours Engaging Shot of Scotch
Ken Loach, the 76-year old, British filmmaker best known for his bleak political dramas such as "The Wind that Shakes the Barley," "Bread and Roses" and "Ladybird Ladybird," has with "The Angels' Share" made a wee, entertaining comedy about the theft of high-priced scotch in Scotland. Like most Loach films, it starts out focused on those barely clinging to the bottom rung of the social ladder, this time in Glasgow. Robbie (newcomer Paul Brannigan), a skinny runt of a young man, is up before a judge who'll decide whether he goes
See full article at The Wrap »

Ken Loach: 'the ruling class are cracking the whip'

The leftwing film director talks about the riots, his early work on television and the documentary he made for Save the Children 40 years ago that is about to be screened for the first time

About halfway through our interview, I call Ken Loach a sadist. The mild-mannered, faintly mole-like film director blinks hard, chuckles, and carries on. We are discussing a key aspect of his film-making: the element of surprise. Loach has spent his career depicting ordinary people, telling working-class stories as truthfully as possible, and he works distinctively – filming each scene in order, often using non-professional actors, encouraging improvisation.

They don't tend to see a full script in advance, and move through his films as confused as the audience about what lurks around the next corner. I ask Loach which surprise was most memorable, and he laughs incongruously through a few examples. He talks about an incident when an actor walked through a door,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Clip joint: Strikes

In anticipation of the public sector strikes on Thursday 30 June, here are five great cinematic portrayals of downing tools

For the most part, cinema celebrates capitalism. From the wild frontiers of the western genre, where it's every man for himself, to James Bond saving the world from evil Soviet plots – not to mention all the movies celebrating the "magic" of Christmas: film is full of individualistic messages.

But not all movies ignore the existence of communist thinking entirely: there are plenty of on-screen characters wearing overalls and flat caps, and refusing to doff those caps to authority. One of the first films to portray workers rising up was Strike, a 1925 silent movie by Russian propagandist Sergei Eisenstein. From 1952, Salt of the Earth tells the true story of workers taking action against lower wages for Mexican workers, and was subsequently banned by a Us government paranoid about communism. But even apolitical
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ben Vereen To Attend Charity Talent Show

Ben Vereen, legendary entertainer, will attend The All Stars talent show in Harlem on Saturday, May 14 at 3:00 Pm at Bread and Roses High School where 100 inner city youth from throughout New York City will produce and perform in a vibrant hip-hop talent show featuring songs, dance and rap.

The All Stars Talent Show Network (Astsn) involves thousands of young people ages 5 to 25 in creating developmental culture through producing and performing in auditions, workshops and talent shows in neighborhood school auditoriums.

“The All Stars is taking the arts into the community and developing a bridge that allows us to see a better way to a future for all of us. When All Stars comes into the poor community, opportunity is built.” states Ben Vereen who was recently awarded the All Stars Project’s 2011 Bridge Building Award for Leadership in Community Relations.

Read more
See full article at Look to the Stars »

A decade of Cannes winners - and the films that should have won

Righting the wrongs of festivals past, I would never have awarded the Palme d'Or to the awful Dancer in the Dark. But the jury got it spot on with Nanni Moretti's deeply-moving The Son's Room

The Cannes film festival is about to start, and today is the day for savouring the eve-of-battle atmosphere … as ever, a luxurious time of leisure before critics and journalists are all plunged into a frantic rush.

For me, the proceedings will be that little bit more hectic, as I am a member of this year's Un Certain Regard jury, chaired by double-Palme d'Or winner Emir Kusturica. My gibbering excitement about this has, so far, been unremittingly uncool. Last year, at this time, I blogged about an imaginary "No Cannes Do" festival, taking place in my imagination, consisting of 10 well-received or at any rate much talked-about Cannes films which for some reason never made it to the UK.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Should non-actors work in feature films?

Directors sometimes like to use 'real' people instead of actors – the results are often wonderful

Using non-professional actors in a fictional movie is a high-risk business. There is a danger that they will, paradoxically, not look "real", or that they will look real and that their authenticity will somehow expose the fiction and createdness of the rest of the film. This blog is a footnote on this subject: in cinemas at this moment, there are two interesting uses of non-professionals.

In Joanna Hogg's Archipelago, the role of the artist and painting teacher Christopher is played by real-life artist Christopher Baker. His character, always laid-back and softly spoken, becomes a kind of father-figure to the troubled young Edward, played by Tom Hiddleston, as the pain caused by his absent father becomes ever clearer. It is a measure of how naturalistic Hogg has made her film and to the rest of the performers that Baker's gentle,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Made in Dagenham | Film review

The strike by women at the Dagenham Ford factory in 1968 that led to the Equal Pay Act is given the Calendar Girls treatment

Andrzej Wajda's superb Man of Iron (1981) was shot in the Gdansk shipyards at the very heart of Solidarity's activities, gave Lech Walesa a brief role as himself, and became part of the political process it commented on. It was a rare case of a feature film based on a major episode in the history of organised labour made close to the actual events. More typically, Mario Monicelli's The Organizer (1963) was a bracing reconstruction of a strike in late 19th-century Turin. Bo Widerberg's Adalen 31 (1969) lyrically recreated the violent strike in northern Sweden that ushered in 40 years of Social Democratic government.

There was an even greater gap in the case of Comrades (1986), Bill Douglas's epic account of the Tolpuddle Martyrs, the Dorset labourers transported
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Adrien Brody, Posterized

Oscar winner Adrien Brody is back in theaters with Predators (i.e. Predators 5: A Reboot??? I don't know. I don't follow these things) and it arrives so shortly after his last sci-fi effort Splice... why not feature him? We never discuss him and isn't there plenty to discuss. As in Wtf with his career? I can't include all 35 movies so I thought we'd pick up just where things got interesting.

Though he's had his share of straight to DVD or barely released indies over the years, he actually started off with quite a few classy projects with the likes of Steven Soderbergh (King of the Hill) and Francis Ford Coppola (New York Stories). He reportedly expected Terrence Malick's The Thin Red Line (1998) to be his film-carrying breakthrough but Malick's film was so fluid in the telling that many famous actors were entirely deleted in the final cut and Brody's part was drastically reduced.
See full article at FilmExperience »
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