The Cruise (1998) - News Poster

(1998)

News

Discover: The SundanceNow Doc Club & Their Truth Telling Risk-Takers

The Independent filmmaker’s nirvana we all know as Sundance showed audiences yet again that honesty is hot right now and documentaries, those cinematic observations of real life, are in the midst of a renaissance.

A large number of films that were lauded this year by critics and filmgoers were either visual journalism features or shorts, or based in fact story tellers. From documentaries Going Clear: Scientology And The Prison Of Belief (an exposé of Scientology), 3½ Minutes (the case of Jordan Davis and the danger and subjectivity of Florida’s Stand Your Ground self-defence laws), and The Wolfpack (the mesmerising story of six home-schooled children who had spent the entirety of their life locked inside their Lower East Side Manhattan apartment), to fact-based films The End Of The Tour (dramatisation of the five-day interview between novelist David Foster Wallace and Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky), A Walk In The Woods
See full article at The Hollywood News »

John Marsh Could Become First Director Oscar-Nommed for Doc Feature and Feature Film

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor

Making the transition from documentary to feature film — or vice versa — can be difficult, but some filmmakers are well-known for jumping between the two styles. Bennett Miller, whose directorial debut was the documentary The Cruise, has made three feature films, including this year’s Oscar contender Foxcatcher.

The Theory of Everything, another of this year’s Oscar contenders, was directed by James Marsh, who received an Oscar nomination for his documentary Man on Wire (2008), which showcases Philippe Petit’s unauthorized high-wire walk between the World Trade Center buildings in 1974. He is also well-known for his documentary Project Nim (2011), about a chimpanzee raised like a human child. Both films garnered him BAFTA nominations: Man on Wire for best British film and Project Nim for best documentary. If Marsh, who received a BAFTA nomination for directing The Theory of Everything, is nominated for a best director Oscar,
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Could Dan Gilroy Become the Sixth Director Oscar-Nommed for First Feature?

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor

Screenwriter Dan Gilroy made his directorial this year with Nightcrawler, which stars Jake Gyllenhaal as a corrupt freelance crime reporter who will do anything to get a story. Since the film’s premiere at the Toronto Film Festival, it’s garnered Oscar buzz and has been compared to best picture winner Crash (2004). It holds a 95 percent positive rating on Rotten Tomatoes, was named one of AFI’s top 10 films of the year and received four BAFTA nominations, as well as three Critics’ Choice Awards. Gyllenhaal has earned Golden Globe, Screen Actors Guild and Critics’ Choice acting nominations. If Gilroy were to earn a nomination for best director, like Crash did, he would become the sixth director in the 21st century to achieve that accolade.

Tony Gilroy, Dan’s older brother, earned his first Oscar nomination for Michael Clayton (2007), his directorial debut. He was also nominated for best original screenplay.
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

First Look 2015

  • MUBI
For Astoria’s Museum of the Moving Image to house an event like the First Look series—opening this Friday and running through January 18—is a cinematic blessing. Here, in its fourth year, you’ll find undistributed gems, but, though its similarities to other festivals halt with “undistributed,” the curation of the series is precise and impeccable, giving an illusion of intimacy. This year, with selections from Omer Fast, Gina Telaroli, and Jessica Hausner, there’s a stress on waking nightmares; films whose atmospheres are bone chilling in both overt and subtle ways.

Ville Marie

Opening with a title card dedicating the film to Carlos Lorenzo, Ville Marie—one of the many experimental films being exhibited during the series—intentionally or otherwise becomes a living fever dream, its use of double and reverse exposure reminiscent of E. Elias Merhige’s horror experiment Begotten. That film sought to expose the horror of creation,
See full article at MUBI »

Live blogging the 2014 Gotham Awards: Follow along with 'Birdman's' big night

  • Hitfix
Live blogging the 2014 Gotham Awards: Follow along with 'Birdman's' big night
Yes, it's true! The first real awards show is here! It's time for the 2014 Gotham Awards live from New York City. The 24th installment of the annual indie awards fete should feature salutes to Tilda Swinton and Bennett Miller as well as an intriguing best feature film showdown between "Birdman" and "Boyhood." You can watch the show streamed live yourself here. For all of this year's nominees and winners click here. 5:08 Pm - And we're off, with Uma Thurman as your host. She's having a few issues looking back and forth between the teleprompters too much. Eke. "And. Then. We. Have... 'Boyhood.'" (aka "the movie my ex-husband made for 12 years"). Just sayin'! 5:09 Pm - Uma is already on her way to full Faye Dunaway camp mode and we're just one minute in! 5:11 Pm - The Ifp has been there since the birth of Independent Film? That might be stretching it,
See full article at Hitfix »

'Foxcatcher' Review: You May Wrestle With It, But It's Definitely Worth Seeing

"Foxcatcher" isn't a film about trapping animals, but it is captivating, and in its own way extremely wild. Based on a true story involving Olympic wrestlers, an heir to a great fortune, and a smouldering conflict that soon caught fire, this is a challenging-yet-rewarding film with some impeccable performances.

This is the one with Steve Carell wearing a funny nose, right?

Yeah, that's the one. It also stars Channing Tatum and Mark Ruffalo. In fact, if there's three things to recommend about the film, it's these actors. Performance-wise the film is incredible, with each actor stretching in ways that put them all at the top of their game.

Carell's quiet sociopathy is riveting, and he portrays John du Pont with an unsettling air that's intoxicating. That snout he wears may be costume affectation, but it gives his face just the right amount of arrogant aloofness to give the film its core tonality.
See full article at Moviefone »

‘Foxcatcher’ Interview with Director Bennett Miller

“I think that we could all do with a healthy dose of disillusionment,” remarks director Bennett Miller while recently speaking in Chicago about his new film Foxcatcher. It’s a statement delivered with his zen garden-like tone (Mark Ruffalo’s words, not mine), and with truth concerning his dramatic pursuits as a storyteller. Foxcatcher, like his previous projects Capote and Moneyball, explores characters and systems that audiences may recognize, but with dramatic ambition then seeks to unravel it in a colder light.

A riveting true story about Olympic wrestling brothers Mark and David Schultz (Channing Tatum and Ruffalo, respectively) and the billionaire who wanted to own their glory (Steve Carell), Foxcatcher is an observational drama on the morose results of the American Dream, and the ideals that create selfish ambition. Miller is certainly aiming high with his material, and mostly achieves this desired prominence with the help of larger-than-life performances.
See full article at Scorecard Review »

Bennett Miller: The "Invisible" Auteur Behind 'Foxcatcher,' 'Moneyball' & 'Capote'

It feels appropriate to write this in the dull early morning. Through the window, the trees are nearly bare, the sky flat and gray; it will not change at all until night falls. If Terrence Malick owns a kind of harvest time golden hour, then perhaps Bennett Miller, director of “Foxcatcher,” (our review) owns this slate, damp, late autumnal dawn. It’s the color of the beginning of his feature debut, “Capote," as a car drives up to a house, eerily still amid miles of empty Kansas farmland. It’s the color of the skies that hover over a deserted Fenway Park as Billy Beane is made an offer he can’t refuse and does. “More clouds of gray… than any Russian play… ” warbles Timothy Speed Levitch tunelessly as Miller’s black and white 1998 documentary “The Cruise” opens, and that same film ends with a hazy, low-contrast aerial shot of
See full article at The Playlist »

He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother: Foxcatcher

One of the more graceful film segments in recent memory, a literally winning one at that, takes place about an hour into the wrestling drama Foxcatcher, directed with patience and precision by Bennett Miller (Moneyball, Capote, The Cruise). In it, each of four males labors in his own way. Straight out of small-town Wisconsin, impressionable prole Mark Schultz (Channing Tatum), heavyweight Gold Medal winner at the 1984 L.A. Olympics, is already under the spell of wealthy, patriotic, and highly educated John du Pont (a career-best Steve Carell) — less eccentric than deranged, the middle-aged heir to the chemical fortune and […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

'Foxcatcher' Review: 10 Things You Should Know About the Starry Drama

Bennett Miller is a filmmaker who knows a good true story when he sees one. The director, who got his start with the documentary "The Cruise," and then directed the critically adored, Oscar-strewn films "Capote" and "Moneyball," both of which were based on real life accounts of very different events (the making of Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" and then something involving math and baseball). For his latest film, "Foxcatcher," Miller once again dips into the reservoir of real life tragedy to come up with his dramatic inspiration.

"Foxcatcher" is based on a famous incident in 1996 when John Du Pont (played in the film by Steve Carell), a multimillionaire weirdo, murdered Mark Schultz (played by Mark Ruffalo), an Olympic wrestler, on his vast estate (named Foxcatcher). Du Pont fancied himself a wrestling fanatic (and amateur coach) and wanted to will a team to Olympic glory basically through money and weird encouragement.
See full article at Moviefone »

Making the Switch From Documentary to Narrative (and vice versa)

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor

Where feature filmmakers head into a project with a script and a plan, the path for documentarians is unpredictable. They follow real subjects and real issues often in real time — and sometimes for years at a time — and piece everything together as the footage comes along. Sometimes, things fall apart or the subject has to change, such as it with Alex Gibney’s The Armstrong Lie (2013). Though different skill sets go into the distinct film forms, some documentary filmmakers choose to transition to narrative features and vice versa, such as Spike Lee, whose next release will be a documentary titled Go Brasil Go!.

Rob Epstein and Jeff Friedman have made the jump from documentaries to feature films and have said that they intend on continuing to make both types of film. Epstein and Friedman won an Oscar for their first co-directed documentary, Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Nyff ’14: Kyle’s 5 Most Anticipated Films

Though I did get to attend the TCM Classic Film Festival earlier this year (which was an amazing experience, and well worth your time), the New York Film Festival, in its 52nd year this time around, will be the first time I will have attended a festival as press. So, I’m very giddy about it. I’m excited to hobnob with other writers, get up at unfathomable times to catch screenings of films in languages I don’t often hear, and write like the wind. So, without further ado, here are my top five anticipated films of Nyff.

- Goodbye to Language 3D | Directed by Jean-Luc Godard

Though I’ve never felt much warmth towards the iconoclastic Godard (save for Vivre sa Vie), I found myself realizing, as word came from Cannes, that I was incredibly eager to test out his newest film Goodbye to Language. Intellectually stimulating, supposedly playful,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Toronto Spotlight: ‘Foxcatcher’s Bennett Miller On Wrestling with Psychosis And Dislocated People In His Non-Fiction Films

  • Deadline
Toronto Spotlight: ‘Foxcatcher’s Bennett Miller On Wrestling with Psychosis And Dislocated People In His Non-Fiction Films
Many saw Foxcatcher when Bennett Miller and Sony Pictures Classics premiered it at Cannes. I saw it yesterday at Toronto, and the tale about two Olympic Gold Medalist brother wrestlers who get entwined with the bizarre Du Pont family scion John is just as soul crushing when it veers from a quirky character study to tragedy. The human need that gets twisted and corroded in the relationship between Mark and Dave Schultz with Du Pont is every bit as powerful as the strange bond between In Cold Blood killer Perry Smith and Truman Capote in Miller’s first narrative film. Capote got five Oscar noms and won Philip Seymour Hoffman his Best Actor Oscar, and Miller’s follow-up, Moneyball, got six Oscar noms including Best Picture. Foxcatcher’s had Oscar buzz on it since Cannes, where Miller was named Best Director and the film was a Palm d’Or nominee with praise for Steve Carell,
See full article at Deadline »

Cannes Check 2014: Bennett Miller's 'Foxcatcher'

  • Hitfix
Cannes Check 2014: Bennett Miller's 'Foxcatcher'
Welcome back to Cannes Check, In Contention's annual preview of the films in Competition at this year's Cannes Film Festival, which kicks off on May 14. Taking on different selections every day, we'll be examining what they're about, who's involved and what their chances are of snagging an award from Jane Campion's jury. Next up, a film we've been waiting to see for some time now: Bennett Miller's "Foxcatcher." The director: Bennett Miller (American, 47 years old). The film may be one of the biggest-name selections in Competition, but in festival auteur terms, Miller is one of its least seasoned entrants -- "Foxcatcher" is only his third narrative feature, and his first to appear at one of the European majors. That said, he's certainly made the other two count. Born and raised in New York, he attended high school with future collaborator Dan Futterman; together with Philip Seymour Hoffman, they
See full article at Hitfix »

'Foxcatcher' Gets Award Season November Release

'Foxcatcher' Gets Award Season November Release
Sony Pictures Classics will release Bennett Miller's "Foxcatcher" on November 14, a full year after it was scheduled to open at the AFI Film Festival 2013. Michael Barker and Tom Bernard pulled the film from that festival; it's now heading to screen in competition at Cannes. It's a big deal to be anointed a full-fledged auteur your first time playing at Cannes, which tends to throw newcomers ("The Cruise," "Capote" and "Moneyball" did not play the festival) into Un Certain Regard or the Quinzaine (Directors Fortnight).  The anticipated awards contender, backed by billionaire Larry Ellison scion Megan Ellison's Annapurna Pictures, is co-financed by Sony. Miller worked with Sony motion picture chairman Amy Pascal on the Oscar-nominated "Moneyball."  E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman (Miller's "Capote" adapted a true story long-in-development by Miller. John du Pont, a multimillionaire and paranoid schizophrenic, built a wrestling training facility named...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

We Can't Wait #3: Foxcatcher

[Editor's Note: We Can't Wait is a Team Experience series, in which we highlight our top 14 most anticipated films of 2014. Here's Glenn Dunks on "Foxcatcher"]

Mark and Dave Schutlz played by Ruffalo and Tatum respectively

Foxcatcher 

Based on the true story of Olympic gold medalist Mark Schultz (Channing Tatum), Foxcatcher tells the story of how John du Pont (Steve Carell), member of the millionaire du Pont family, murdered Schultz's brother, wrestling champion Dave (Mark Ruffalo). 

Talent

Director Bennett Miller, unlike the David O. Russells of the world, is switching his casts with each movie. Here he is working with a screenplay by Oscar-nominated Dan Futterman and Emmy-nominated E. Max Eyre. Steve Carell, Mark Ruffalo and Channing Tatum take the three major roles, but the peripheries are filled out with such names as Vanessa Redgrave, Sienna Miller, Anthony Michael Hall and prolific character actor Brett Rice.

Why We Can't Wait

Appearing, at least on first inspection, like a cross between the real life sport drama of Moneyball and the small town true crime drama of Capote
See full article at FilmExperience »

Speed Levitch Talks About His New Hulu Series, Richard Linklater and the Perils of Being a Documentary Subject

Speed Levitch Talks About His New Hulu Series, Richard Linklater and the Perils of Being a Documentary Subject
Timothy "Speed" Levitch is both an unconventional tour guide and a kind of indie film muse. Working on double-decker bus hosting sightseeing tours in his native New York in the '90s, he attracted attention for his unique, philosophical take on the city and its history. He eventually became the subject of the 1998 documentary "The Cruise," which launched the career of "Moneyball" director Bennett Miller and made Levitch both a fixture on the festival circuit and an occasional on-screen presence in films like "Scotland, Pa.," "Waking Life" and "The School of Rock." Levitch's friendship with Richard Linklater, director of those latter two features, lead to the pair conceiving of the new Hulu original series "Up to Speed," a quirky, psychedelic half-hour travel show that showcases host Levitch's personality and his distinctive take on a location's past and present. He takes...

...
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Speed Levitch Talks About His New Hulu Series, Richard Linklater and the Perils of Being a Documentary Subject

  • Indiewire
Speed Levitch Talks About His New Hulu Series, Richard Linklater and the Perils of Being a Documentary Subject
Timothy "Speed" Levitch is both an unconventional tour guide and a kind of indie film muse. Working on double-decker bus hosting sightseeing tours in his native New York in the '90s, he attracted attention for his unique, philosophical take on the city and its history. He eventually became the subject of the 1998 documentary "The Cruise," which launched the career of "Moneyball" director Bennett Miller and made Levitch both a fixture on the festival circuit and an occasional on-screen presence in films like "Scotland, Pa.," "Waking Life" and "The School of Rock." Levitch's friendship with Richard Linklater, director of those latter two features, lead to the pair conceiving of the new Hulu original series "Up to Speed," a quirky, psychedelic half-hour travel show that showcases host Levitch's personality and his distinctive take on a location's past and present. He takes...
See full article at Indiewire »

Kevin Smith, Richard Linklater Join Hulu Summer Slate

Kevin Smith, Richard Linklater Join Hulu Summer Slate
Hulu unveiled a summer slate of 10 shows Monday, including the Kevin Smith movie show "Spoilers" and a Richard Linklater travel show called "Up to Speed." "Spoilers," a half-hour movie "revue" with fearure the "Clerks" and "Red State" director talking movies. It launches on Hulu and Hulu Plus on June 4th. "Up to Speed," from the "Dazed and Confused" and "School of Rock" director, stars Speed Levitch ("The Cruise"). It debuts in August. The basketball comedy "We Got Next, "co-created by Kenya Barris (“America’s Next Top Model”) and Hale Rothstein (“The Game”) will
See full article at The Wrap »

'Catching Fire': Our Breakdown Of Two New Possible Directors

Bennett Miller and Francis Lawrence have been added to short list to direct 'Hunger Games' sequel.

By Kevin P. Sullivan

Jennifer Lawrence in "Hunger Games"

Photo: Lionsgate

It is now certainly safe to say that the search for a "Catching Fire" director is under way. Not long after "Hunger Games" director Gary Ross turned down the job, names of potential replacements began appearing. Last week, a Lionsgate wish list of seven or eight directors included the names David Cronenberg, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu and Alfonso Cuaron. (We also had a few suggestions of our own.)

Now, two more possibilities have stepped forward. The Playlist is reporting that Bennett Miller and Francis Lawrence are also in contention for the gig. Both directors have impressive résumés, but "Catching Fire" would be their most noteworthy credits to date.

Here is our breakdown of the two latest candidates.

Bennett Miller

Background: Documentary

Miller's first film
See full article at MTV Movie News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites