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U.S. Trailer for Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Ghost Story ‘Daguerrotype’ Starring Tahar Rahim

The U.S. distribution of Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s films are never guaranteed, so when one comes our way, we’ll take it however it arrives. His ghost story Daguerrotype, which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival last fall, will get a VOD release next month, on November 7, and now a new trailer has landed.

Starring Tahar Rahim, Constance Rousseau, and Olivier Gourmet, the story follows a daguerreotype photographer’s assistant who falls in love with his employer’s daughter and things get more mysterious therein. See the trailer below, following an excerpt from our review:

Kiyoshi Kurosawa has ways of making it look easy, even unimpressive. To my knowledge, he has never made a film that’s less than a pleasure to simply observe, richly detailed in environment and carefully calibrated in composition, cutting, and gesture — masterclasses too focused on feeling (excitement, mystery, romance, and, most often, terror) to pronounce great pretensions.
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Before We Vanish’ Review: Kiyoshi Kurosawa Inches Towards Relevance With Sedate Alien Invasion Story — Nyff

  • Indiewire
‘Before We Vanish’ Review: Kiyoshi Kurosawa Inches Towards Relevance With Sedate Alien Invasion Story — Nyff
Watching the dreadful and painfully distended films Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa made over the last 10 years, you’d be forgiven for thinking that he was abducted in 2008 and hijacked by a clueless alien parasite trying to keep up appearances. A major figure during the early days of J-horror, Kurosawa distilled the entropy creeping into the digital age before most other artists even felt it — modern classics like “Cure,” “Pulse,” and even the less-horrifying likes of “Bright Future” continue to serve as invaluable time capsules from the era that we’re still trying to escape.

As recently as “Tokyo Sonata,” which is now almost a decade old, it seemed as though Kurosawa could sublimate his obsessions with societal decay into any genre, and the shattering final scene of that film left fans desperate to see where he would go next.

Then, things got bad. The falloff was subtle at first, and it came in small doses,
See full article at Indiewire »

Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Jumbled Yet Fascinating ‘Before We Vanish’ [Nyff Review]

Kiyoshi Kurosawa, the Japanese filmmaker behind “Cure,” Pulse” and “Tokyo Sonata,” tackles the sci-fi thriller in his latest venture entitled “Before We Vanish.” Adapted from Tomohiro Maekawa‘s play of the same name, which has been revived on the Japanese stage many times, the film has echoes of “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” which also had its invaders draining brains and ultimately trying to take our much beloved planet.

Continue reading Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Jumbled Yet Fascinating ‘Before We Vanish’ [Nyff Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

New to Streaming: ‘Manifesto,’ ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,’ ‘Creepy,’ ‘A Woman’s Life,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

After the Storm (Hirokazu Kore-eda)

Can our children pick and choose the personality traits they inherit, or are they doomed to obtain our lesser qualities? These are the hard questions being meditated on in After the Storm, a sobering, transcendent tale of a divorced man’s efforts to nudge back into his son’s life. Beautifully shot by regular cinematographer Yutaka Yamasaki, it marks a welcome and quite brilliant
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Creepy’ Review: ‘Pulse’ Director Kiyoshi Kurosawa Returns to Form with a Chiller That Lives Up to Its Title

  • Indiewire
‘Creepy’ Review: ‘Pulse’ Director Kiyoshi Kurosawa Returns to Form with a Chiller That Lives Up to Its Title
According to a lecture given early in “Creepy,” serial killers are broken down into three categories: organized, disorganized, and mixed characteristic. The first two are relatively easy to define, and thus simpler to track down. Mixed-characteristic killers, meanwhile, exhibit no discernible patterns. They’re puzzles, anomalies. You can probably guess which class of killer this detective story from Kiyoshi Kurosawa follows.

The director, whose genre mastery is most evident in the likes of “Pulse” and “Cure,” more recently delved into this territory in “Daguerreotype.” That old-fashioned haunt took him outside Japan with the help of Tahar Rahim, Olivier Gourmet, and Mathieu Amalric; “Creepy” is both a return home and a return to form. Here he’s woven a procedural yarn from a novel by Yutaka Maekawa that was either loosely adapted or strikingly aligned with the director’s long-established sensibilities.

Read MoreNew Films By Terence Davies & Kiyoshi Kurosawa Set Berlin Premieres,
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Before We Vanish’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Before We Vanish’
Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s “Before We Vanish” may be a sci-fi thriller about an alien attack and brain-drain à la “Invasion of the Body Snatchers,” but its ultimate message is the salvation of love. Playing frequently like an absurdist political satire with only flashes of violence, this low-tension, drawn-out work won’t gratify the chills or adrenaline rushes fanboys crave, but the ending strikes a romantic chord so pure that all but the most jaded cynics will be moved. Distributed in Europe through Wild Bunch,the film will rely heavily on Kurosawa’s reputation and longtime supporters even for moderate success.

The literal Japanese title, “Strolling Invaders,” suggests a threat so casual it’s not immediately noticeable. In light of how press freedom and human rights are being whittled away in many parts of the world, a story about aliens robbing humans of their values (family, work, rules) and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes: First Teaser For Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Alien Invasion Movie ‘Before We Vanish’

You can’t throw a rock without hitting a must-see movie at the Cannes Film Festival this year, and there are plenty more beyond the big name titles that are worth putting on the radar. And one that has our attention is Kiyoshi Kurosawa‘s “Before We Vanish.”

Slotted into the ‘Un Certain Regard’ section, the latest from the director of “Cure,” “Creepy,” and “Tokyo Sonata,” seems to be a hybrid of an alien invasion story and relationship drama.

Continue reading Cannes: First Teaser For Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Alien Invasion Movie ‘Before We Vanish’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

17 Shocks and Surprises from the 2017 Cannes Lineup, From ‘Twin Peaks’ to Netflix and Vr

For such a highly anticipated event, the Cannes Film Festival tends to contain a fairly predictable lineup: The Official Selection focuses on established auteurs whose work lands a coveted slot at the flashy gathering on autopilot. That was certainly the case last year, when the 2016 edition opened with a Woody Allen movie and featured new work from the likes of Pedro Almodovar, Nicolas Winding Refn, the Dardennes brothers and Olivier Assayas.

But we live in unpredictable times, and judging by today’s announcement of the Official Selection for Cannes 2017, even the world’s most powerful festival isn’t impervious to change. This year’s Cannes is filled with surprises: television and virtual reality, some intriguing non-fiction selections, and a whole lot of unknown quantities that push the festival in fresh directions.

That’s not to say that there aren’t a few familiar names that stand out. Todd Haynes is
See full article at Indiewire »

New to Streaming: ‘Jackie,’ ‘Fences,’ ‘I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

10 Cloverfield Lane (Dan Trachtenberg)

Forget the Cloverfield connection. The actors who were in this film didn’t even know what the title was until moments before the first trailer dropped. Producer J.J. Abrams used that branding as part of the wrapping for its promotional mystery box, but the movie stands perfectly alone from 2008’s found-footage monster picture. Hell, 10 Cloverfield Lane perhaps doesn’t even take place within the same
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Bottom Shelf: John Carpenter, Absurd, Intruder, Creepy

Nick Aldwinckle Mar 2, 2017

Vampires, Ghosts Of Mars and the super-tense Creepy lead our latest round-up of horror DVDs and Blu-rays...

Any regular readers (there must be a few of you; there must be) will be more than aware of this writer’s borderline obsessive love for the movies of one John Carpenter. You’ve got your Halloween, The Thing, They Live or The Fog, but everyone knows the real quality comes in the form of the later films in this cult film-maker, lord of the synth and accomplished ‘tache-wearer’s career and the classics that are Escape From L.A and his TV-movie take on Village Of The Damned. No? Ok, those are both more than a little iffy, but with the latest Blu-ray release of two other generally maligned late efforts in Carpenter’s body of work, we ask the age-old question 'Was Vampires really that bad?'

Yes,
See full article at Den of Geek »

New Trailer for Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s ‘Daguerreotype’ Explores a Photographer’s Obsession

Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa (Cure, Tokyo Sonata, and Creepy) is back with Daguerreotype, and like the title suggests, the story follows the obsession of an aged photographer (Oliver Gourmet) as he uses his own daughter and assistant for rendering life-like images, using old photographic techniques. Recently stopping by the Toronto International Film Festival where it was met with a divisive reaction, a new trailer has now landed, albeit without English subtitles, for the film known in France as Le Secret De La Chambre Noire, which translates to The Secret of the Darkroom.

We said in our review, “Kiyoshi Kurosawa has ways of making it look easy, even unimpressive. To my knowledge, he has never made a film that’s less than a pleasure to simply observe, richly detailed in environment and carefully calibrated in composition, cutting, and gesture — masterclasses too focused on feeling (excitement, mystery, romance, and, most often, terror) to pronounce great pretensions.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Notebook Reviews: Kiyoshi Kurosawa's "Creepy"

  • MUBI
Premiering earlier this year the Berlin International Film Festival, Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa's Creepy is a detective tale freely adapted from an award-winning novel by Yukata Maekawa. Like his second film shown at film festivals this year, Daguerrotype, it may not be the masterpiece on the level of Cure or Charisma that some of the filmmaker's fans are continually looking for, just like some acolytes of Johnnie To forever want him to make another The Mission. But then again, Kurosawa has always been a B-movie director at his core, with a love for pulp material that he slows down and draws out, mining the schlock and cliché of horror films and thrillers for their deep metaphysical unease. He films a world broken and disturbed at its core, so how can we expect perfection from such a vision?After the ghost romance Journey to the Shore, which debuted last year at Cannes,
See full article at MUBI »

Newswire: Kiyoshi Kurosawa, king of ambiguous dread, won’t say what his next movie’s about

Kiyoshi Kurosawa, the Japanese writer-director behind some of the most unsettling horror movies of recent decades, including Cure and Pulse, has been having a pretty good year. He’s premiered two new films, one of which, Creepy, recently opened in the U.S. and ranks as some of his best work in years. (The other, Daguerrotype, doesn’t yet have an American distributor.) And he’s already finished his next film, a currently untitled project that’s been shrouded in a fair amount of secrecy.

From Screen Daily come the first bits of information we’ve had about the film: it’s an adaptation of a play (though Kurosawa won’t say which one) and is being described as a “sci-fi suspense film” by its studio, Nikkatsu. The movie is currently in post-production, though at this point, even the cast is unknown. Screen Daily quotes the director as saying, “I
See full article at The AV Club »

[Review] Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s ‘Creepy’ Earns its Title

[Review] Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s ‘Creepy’ Earns its Title
It has been 10 years since Kiyoshi Kurosawa unleashed a horror film unto the world (2006’s Retribution), and even longer since his smash hits Cure (1997) and Pulse (2001). He returns to the genre he is known for with Creepy, which has its Texas premiere at the Austin Asian American Film Festival tomorrow night. Creepy is a slow burn thriller that has a […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Creepy Set to Terrify the Austin Asian American Film Festival

Fans of Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa (Pulse, Cure) and his contributions to J-horror will be happy to know that the director’s latest film Creepy will see its wide, digital release in just a few weeks on November 25th, 2016. Ahead of its release,… Continue Reading →

The post Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Creepy Set to Terrify the Austin Asian American Film Festival appeared first on Dread Central.
See full article at Dread Central »

Eureka Unveils From Caligari To Hitler, Creepy, VARIETÉ and More for January

One of our favourite distributors, Eureka! Entertainment, has announced its January slate of home releases, and as usual it boasts an eclectic and enticing range of diverse titles from around the world. Five new titles were announced, three of which will be part of their prestigious Masters of Cinema series. On 16 January, Robert Wiene's The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (spine no.92) will be re-issued in a limited edition 2-disc steelbook edition, now including Rüdiger Suchsland’s excellent 2014 documentary, From Caligari to Hitler: German Cinema in the Age of the Masses - well worth a double dip for those who already have the regular release. 23 January sees Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s fantastically unsettling Creepy arrive on dual-format Blu-ray and DVD. The director of Cure...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Movie Review: Horror master Kiyoshi Kurosawa finds evil next door in Creepy

When it comes to the films of Japanese writer-director Kiyoshi Kurosawa, the most apt comparisons have long been Fritz Lang and David Lynch, even though neither speaks to how his movies actually look. Like the former, he draws on a fascination with evil (one can imagine Lang’s masterpieces M and The Testament Of Dr. Mabuse remade as Kurosawa movies), and like the latter, he merges the macabre and the everyday in a way that unsettles feelings about both. In his films—which include Cure and Pulse, both classics of modern horror that rank among this publication’s favorites—an eerie and unclassifiable atmosphere of mystery grows around familiar genres: the detective procedural, the domestic drama, the ghost story. These movies find a way into the cosmic and unknowable through pulp clichés (overworked cops, supercriminals, subterranean lairs, etc.) and apparent predictability. Their repetitions become more mysterious with every occurrence, and
See full article at The AV Club »

Tokyo film festival to honour Scorsese, Kurosawa

Tokyo film festival to honour Scorsese, Kurosawa
Martin Scorsese and Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa are the recipients of Samurai Awards at this year’s Tokyo International Film Festival.

The Tokyo International Film Festival (October 25-November 3) will bestow its third annual Samurai Award to directors Martin Scorsese and Kiyoshi Kurosawa.

The award commends achievements by veteran filmmakers who continue to create groundbreaking films that carve paths to a new era in cinema. Previous recipients include Tim Burton and John Woo.

While Scorsese won’t be attending the 29th edition of the festival to collect his award, it couldn’t be more timely. His latest project, Silence, is based on a novel by Japanese author Shusaku Endo and is set in Japan.

Described as Scorsese’s passion project, having taken 27 years to realise, the film is scheduled for Us release in November, placing it in contention for next year’s Academy Awards, and for 2017 release in Japan.

Tokyo Sonata director Kurosawa will be present to receive
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Toronto After Dark Film Festival announces first 10 films for 2016

The Toronto After Dark Film Festival has announced the first wave of films set to screen at the 11th annual edition, which takes place between October 13th and October 21st. Check out the line-up below, and head on over to the official site for more info and to purchase tickets…

Under The Shadow (Iran/UK/Jordan) Opening Gala Film & Special Presentation

We open the festival with the supernatural tale, Under The Shadow. The scary Sundance sensation has drawn comparisons with our previous festival gem, The Babadook. After her husband leaves to fight in the war with Iraq, an Iranian mother and her young daughter are left to cope by themselves in an increasingly empty apartment building. It’s soon clear that someone or something else has moved into the building with them – an evil spirit who with a sinister agenda of its own. One the scariest films of the year,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Toronto After Dark Film Festival 2016’s First Wave of Movies Include In A Valley Of Violence, Under The Shadow

  • DailyDead
Cowboys and sinister spirits are coming to Canada this October for the 11th annual Toronto After Dark Film Festival. The fest's first ten films have now been announced, including Ti West's new Western, In a Valley of Violence, Babak Anvari's Under the Shadow, Richard Bates Jr.'s Trash Fire, and more.

Toronto After Dark Film Festival takes place October 13th–21st. To learn more, visit the festival's official website and check out the press release below for full details:

Press Release:September 22, 2016: Toronto After Dark Film Festival is thrilled to officially unveil its first wave of exciting film announcements for 2016! Included in the lineup are some of the most critically acclaimed and eagerly anticipated new horror, sci-fi, action and cult films from this year’s international film festival circuit. These 10 new movies will all screen at Toronto After Dark Film Festival as part of the 11th Annual Edition
See full article at DailyDead »
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