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‘Private Life’ Review: Paul Giamatti & Kathryn Hahn Shine in This Agonizing Family Dramedy [Sundance]

‘Private Life’ Review: Paul Giamatti & Kathryn Hahn Shine in This Agonizing Family Dramedy [Sundance]
For many couples, conceiving a child isn’t much of a challenge. For some, it’s a total freak accident. But for Rachel (Kathryn Hahn) and Richard (Paul Giamatti) it’s an uphill battle that they’ve been fighting for years with no signs of progress. In her latest feature, writer/director Tamara Jenkins (The Savages, Slums of Beverly Hills) slowly unfurls […]

The post ‘Private Life’ Review: Paul Giamatti & Kathryn Hahn Shine in This Agonizing Family Dramedy [Sundance] appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Tamara Jenkins Delivers Infertility Dramedy ‘Private Life’ for Sundance Opening Night

  • The Wrap
Tamara Jenkins Delivers Infertility Dramedy ‘Private Life’ for Sundance Opening Night
Director Tamara Jenkins has always been interested in the family dynamic. The indie classic “Slums of Beverly Hills” was about failed upward mobility in the late 1970s. “The Savages” was about disinterested siblings who need to solve the problem of an ailing father.

After a ten-year break, Jenkins returned to open the 2018 Sundance Film Festival on Thursday night with “Private Life,” about a reproductively-challenged couple who need to start a family before they eviscerate the two-person unit they’ve already got.

Kathryn Hahn plays Rachel, a 41-year-old novelist who...
See full article at The Wrap »

A Decade After ‘The Savages,’ Tamara Jenkins Returns to Sundance With a Personal Netflix Film

A Decade After ‘The Savages,’ Tamara Jenkins Returns to Sundance With a Personal Netflix Film
After she earned an Original Screenplay Oscar nomination for “The Savages” in 2008, along with a Best Actress nomination for star Laura Linney, writer-director Tamara Jenkins looked forward to a smoother run. Instead, it was a decade before she could make her next film, “Private Life,” a Netflix production starring Kathryn Hahn and Paul Giamatti that premieres opening night at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival.

“It took a long time to get the movie made,” Jenkins said. Some of this was her own doing; she and screenwriter husband Jim Taylor have a small child, and “I have my own slow demons, in terms of writing.” And then, displaying her own talent for the dry understatement that often informs her own filmmaking voice: “There’s always this delay.”

It’s not the first time this has happened. “The Savages” came nine years after her first feature, the 1998 Fox Searchlight comedy “Slums of Beverly Hills
See full article at Indiewire »

A Decade After ‘The Savages,’ Tamara Jenkins Returns to Sundance With a Personal Netflix Film

A Decade After ‘The Savages,’ Tamara Jenkins Returns to Sundance With a Personal Netflix Film
After she earned an Original Screenplay Oscar nomination for “The Savages” in 2008, along with a Best Actress nomination for star Laura Linney, writer-director Tamara Jenkins looked forward to a smoother run. Instead, it was a decade before she could make her next film, “Private Life,” a Netflix production starring Kathryn Hahn and Paul Giamatti that premieres opening night at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival.

“It took a long time to get the movie made,” Jenkins said. Some of this was her own doing; she and screenwriter husband Jim Taylor (with whom she wrote another Sundance film, “Juliet, Naked”) have a small child, and “I have my own slow demons, in terms of writing.” And then, displaying her own talent for the dry understatement that often informs her own filmmaking voice: “There’s always this delay.”

It’s not the first time this has happened. “The Savages” came nine years after her first feature,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Tamara Jenkins, Todd Haynes, Jonas Akerlund and More Added to 2018 Sundance Film Festival

Sundance always drops an announcement or two following their initial burst in early December, and today the Sundance Institute has done just that, releasing the titles of films and programs that cross the festival’s various programming categories. Honestly, when the first list came out without Tamara Jenkins’s latest, Private Life, I was expecting to see it slide into the schedule at a later date, which it has done today. The Slums of Beverly Hills/The Savages director’s new film stars Kathryn Hahn and Paul Giamatti in a tale of a couple exploring assisted reproduction and domestic adoption as they try to […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Laff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Elizabeth Rohrbaugh— “Becks”

Becks

Elizabeth Rohrbaugh is writer and director based in NYC. Her documentary, “The Perfect Victim,” was on the PBS series “America Reframed” after premiering at the Hot Springs International Film Festival. The film won a Telly Award and was nominated for a Silver Gavel Award. Rohrbaugh previously worked as a writer and director at MTV, where she won an Emmy Award and multiple Ctam Awards.

Becks” will premiere at the 2017 La Film Festival on June 15. The film is co-directed by Daniel Powell.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

ER: “Becks” is the story of an aimless singer-songwriter who moves back in with her mom, a former nun, after her cross-country move to be with her long-distance girlfriend ends in disaster. After weeks of moping, Becks begins exploring her hometown of St. Louis in a half-baked attempt to put her life back together.

She begins singing and playing music at her friend’s bar where she finds catharsis in playing her breakup music. She meets and befriends the wife of the guy who outed her at prom and starts giving her guitar lessons.

As she struggles to put the pieces of her life together she learns to look at her past from a new perspective and works to let go of co-dependent relationships.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

ER: This story is loosely inspired by a very good friend of mine, Alyssa Robbins, whose music is used throughout the film. She is a singer-songwriter and teacher who was going through a difficult breakup during a time that I was back in my hometown of St. Louis.

She found herself back home with her mom and began touring through the Midwest performing her music at local bars and clubs. She came through St. Louis and played at a tiny retro 24-hour diner on a Sunday night and the show was bizarre and beautiful, and filled with an odd but enthusiastic crowd.

The cathartic and honest nature of her performance even left the owner — a gruff man likely in his mid 70s — in tears as he reflected on his relationship with his own daughter. I left that evening feeling like I had lived a scene from a movie, and became drawn in as I reflected on my own place in life.

Despite the fact that from an outside perspective it would seem that Alyssa and I lived very different lives, we were actually in the exact same place — too old to not have our shit together and too young to be having our respective midlife crises.

Dan Powell and I had been working to collaborate on a feature narrative together and were throwing ideas around when I told him about this experience. We became very inspired by the idea of using a real person as the basis for a character — finding a way to practically incorporate her music, and creating a modern musical.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

ER: I would like for the audience to leave the theater feeling inspired and moved to make an active change in their lives. I know — that’s a tall order.

I hope that people will love the music and the incredible performances from Lena Hall, Mena Suvari, Christine Lahti, and Dan Fogler, and will feel touched by the film’s ending.

I hope that the characters feel like real to life, complex, and fully formed people. I would like to send the message that people are messy and imperfect beings, and that nobody really has it figured out.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

ER: Honestly, as far as production goes I had a glorious, amazing, life-changing experience. I had so much fun and Dan and I work splendidly together. It was my first time co-directing and it was wonderful. The entire shoot came together very quickly and having two directors allowed us to give attention to details that could have otherwise gone ignored had we not had the bandwidth.

Finding our key location was very difficult as we needed to be able to find a spot in the NYC area that could pass for suburban St. Louis and had no time and no money. Ultimately I found a place on Airbnb that was perfect and that we could afford.

For me personally, I was in the middle of moving two children and a household from St. Louis to Brooklyn and basically had to ignore living in squalor out of boxes for a couple of months. My parents and husband were incredibly supportive taking me off mom-duty entirely during prep and shooting.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

ER: Our funding came from Dan and my’s production companies, Irony Point and Outer Borough Pictures respectively, along with an investment from Tony Hernandez at Jax Media. Jax also provided us with all of our office space for pre-production and production.

We have a stellar beast of a producer, Alex Bach, who was masterful at making this film happen. I still don’t know quite how she pulled it off with our budget.

Dan and I have also been working in the industry for a decade each and called in all of the favors we had waiting for us.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at Laff?

ER: I am thrilled and excited and also a nervous wreck! But that is just who I am. I actually love observing an audience watch my work to gauge their reactions to lines, jokes, emotional scenes, and so forth.

To be able to premiere our first feature at one of the top indie film festivals in the country is a dream for me — probably in the way that some people dream about their wedding. I fantasize about film festivals.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

ER: The worst advice I have received — I will not mention who gave it — is that in a relationship only one person can have a focused career, particularly when kids come around. I very briefly followed that advice and was very depressed and unfulfilled. I have since discovered that my professional passions are a large part of my relationship and my family as a whole, and have become a much happier person as a result.

The best advice I have received, from my husband, was to start career and life coaching, which I have done with Betsy Capes at Capes Coaching. It has helped me remove the clutter of insecurity and distraction and helped me focus on getting what I want. It has been a phenomenal way to find my career path.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

ER: My advice is generic but true, which is that this is quite hard and takes a long time. Do this if you love it and if you love it then do it all the way. Make stuff as much as you can. Save up and make a short. But make sure that the script is on point and the casting is the best that it possibly can be — that you have prepared everything.

Hire the best people you can possibly afford, trust them to be professionals, and know what they are talking about. Develop friendships with talented people who you can collaborate with for years to come. Look at your peers — these are the people you will come up with so begin working together now. Develop a shorthand. And trust your vision above all else.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

ER: “Slums of Beverly Hills” by Tamara Jenkins. I haven’t seen it for years and have no idea if it holds up. “The Savages” is probably technically a better movie as I think her style became more nuanced and sophisticated, but I still love “Slums” more.

I was shown her shorts at Nyu in a film class and was immediately obsessed. She spoke the female coming-of-age language in such a fresh and different way and I adored it. I love Kevin Corrigan as the romantic interest in “Slums” and Natasha Lyonne is amazing.

After I saw the shorts I requested an interview with her for a class. She let me come to her apartment and interview her, which devolved into me professing my admiration and asking if I could work for her for free. She politely declined.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

ER: I deeply hope that more female filmmakers are recognized by the film community. From my time as a film student at Nyu I have always been aware that this is a male-driven industry and it takes chutzpah to persist in a field where you may not always be taken seriously.

That said, I have had tremendous mentors, male and female, who have supported me wholeheartedly throughout my career. I love working with female crew members on set and feel that it lends itself to a very collaborative process.

When we wrapped “Becks” I said that my life goal is just to get to do this again and again and again. I can only hope that the work resonates with a wide audience because that will ultimately prove our worth.

Unfortunately, getting a movie made is difficult and there is no rule book. I think we need to just keep pushing, and making stuff and moving forward. I’m writing another screenplay right now and will crawl through the mud to get it made.

Laff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Elizabeth Rohrbaugh— “Becks” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

15 Good Dark Comedies to Watch on Netflix in April 2017

This is no festive prank, these movies are hilarious.

Let’s face it, the world is a wreck. Every day things look bleaker than they did the day before. It’s gotten to the point where, if you can’t learn to laugh at our misery, you’re finished. If you need some help figuring out how to find humor in even the worst bits of the human experience, dark comedies work, Netflix has them, and we’ve made a list of the good ones. Click on the films’ titles to be taken to their Netflix pages.

Pick of the Month: This Must Be the Place (2011)

I can’t think of another movie in recent times that’s been so good and gotten so little love and attention in return. Maybe that’s because the concept of a former 80s glam rocker who still wears his makeup (Sean Penn) tracking down the Nazi concentration camp guard who
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Tamara Jenkins to Direct “Private Life,” Starring Kathryn Hahn and Molly Shannon

Tamara Jenkins: Nyu Tisch School of the Arts

It’s been a decade since Tamara Jenkins released her last film, but the writer-director has a project on the way, and it sounds amazing: “Private Life,” a Netflix original film, will star Kathryn Hahn (“Bad Moms”), Paul Giamatti (“Billions”), and Molly Shannon (“Divorce).

Variety reports that the drama centers on a couple (Hahn and Giamatti) “in the throes of infertility, trying to maintain their marriage as they descend deeper and deeper into the weird world of assisted reproduction and domestic adoption.” Shannon, who recently won an Independent Spirit Award for her supporting turn in “Other People,” plays a friend of the couple.

Stefanie Azpiazu (“Enough Said”) and Anthony Bregman (“Foxcatcher”) are producing, and filming is slated to kick off next month.

Jenkins most recently directed “The Savages.” The critically-acclaimed 2007 dramedy centers on adult siblings (Laura Linney and Philip Seymour Hoffman) dealing with their father’s ailing health. The film earned her an Oscar nomination for Best Original Screenplay. Jenkins also wrote and directed the 1998 cult classic “Slums of Beverly Hills,” starring Natasha Lyonne (“Orange Is the New Black”).

“Writing is weird and lonely and makes you grumpy and strange,” Jenkins has said of the writing process. She emphasized, “To write you really should be writing every single day to keep the muscle going. But then if you write and make a movie, the year of working on the movie goes by and then you’re supposed to start writing again and you have kind of forgotten how.”

Tamara Jenkins to Direct “Private Life,” Starring Kathryn Hahn and Molly Shannon was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

‘The Savages’ Director Tamara Jenkins Returns with ‘Private Life’

This year will mark a decade since the release of The Savages, the second feature from Slums of Beverly Hills director Tamara Jenkins. Starring Laura Linney and Philip Seymour Hoffman, it was a powerfully-acted, perceptive look at familial struggle, and we’ve been waiting ever since for her follow-up. 10 years later, it is finally coming and a cast has already been set.

Financed and distributed by Netflix, Private Life stars Paul Giamatti, Kathryn Hahn, Molly Shannon, and John Carroll Lynch. Jenkins’ script follows a married couple (Giamatti and Hahn) who are struggling with infertility and its damaging effect on their relationship, but when their niece offers up her eggs, things change. Shannon, who picked up an Indie Spirit award for Other People this year, will play the niece’s mother, while Lynch plays Giamatti’s brother and Shannon’s husband.

Produced by Anthony Bregman and Stefanie Azpiazu (Enough Said, Indignation
See full article at The Film Stage »

New to Netflix in March: ‘The Discovery,’ ‘Burning Sands’ and More Sundance Offerings

  • Indiewire
New to Netflix in March: ‘The Discovery,’ ‘Burning Sands’ and More Sundance Offerings
Netflix has announced the new titles arriving on the streaming platform next month, with five original films leading the pack: “Burning Sands” (3/10), “Deidra & Laney Rob a Train” (3/17), “Pandora” (3/17), “The Most Hated Woman in America” (3/24) and “The Discovery” (3/31). Three of these — “Burning Sands,” “Deidra & Laney,” “The Discovery” — are Netflix Origins that premiered during the Sundance Film Festival in January.

Read More: ‘The Discovery’ Review: Rooney Mara And Jason Segel Find Life After Death — Sundance 2017

Also available to stream next month are “The Bfg,” “Pete’s Dragon,” “The Life Aquatic,” “Blazing Saddles,” “Chicago,” “Jurassic Park,” “Memento,” “Million Dollar Baby,” “Evolution,” “Fire at Sea” and “Welcome to New York,” among others, while the likes of “Jaws,” “Animal House,” “Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey” and “Entertainment” are all expiring at the end of February. Find a full list of what’s coming in March below.

Read More: Why Martin Scorsese’s Netflix Deal Is
See full article at Indiewire »

Q&A with Antibirth Writer/Director Danny Perez

Both unflinchingly realistic and strangely surreal, the new film Antibirth boldly blazes a path into a genre all its own. With IFC Midnight releasing Antibirth in select theaters and on VOD this Friday, September 2nd, I had the opportunity to catch up with writer/director Danny Perez for our latest Q&A feature to discuss working with Natasha Lyonne and Mark Webber, mixing contrasting elements in settings and tone, and much more.

Thanks for taking the time to answer some questions for us, Danny, and congratulations on Antibirth. It’s definitely a film that will stick with me for a long time to come. Had this story been brewing within you for a while? How long did it take you to write the screenplay?

Danny Perez: Thanks for your support. The script had gone through about twenty drafts over about four years. I had been interested in various elements
See full article at DailyDead »

Random Roles: David Krumholtz on 10 Things I Hate About You and the role that almost killed him

Welcome to Random Roles, wherein we talk to actors about the characters who defined their careers. The catch: They don’t know beforehand what roles we’ll ask them to talk about.

The actor: An actor since he was 13, David Krumholtz has been blessed with a number of phases in his Hollywood career. First, there was his kid-star phase, in which Krumholtz hit it big with roles in movies like Addams Family Values and The Santa Clause. In the late ’90s, he transitioned into being a teen actor, popping up in movies like 10 Things I Hate About You and Slums Of Beverly Hills before making a run at a number of television series, including ER and the Rob Lowe vehicle The Lyon’s Den. He found a solid TV gig in 2005, when he was cast as math genius Charlie Eppes on Numbers, marking yet another phase in ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Denise Richards: examining her recent straight-to-dvd movies

Kirsten Howard Jul 19, 2016

From Blonde And Blonder and You Stupid Man, through to Edmond: we go through the recent straight-to-dvd films of Denise Richards...

So far in this series of pieces that look at the straight-to-dvd or VOD movies of some of our favourite actors who have fallen on hard times, we’ve only looked at men (to date: Bruce Willis, Nicolas Cage, John Cusack and John Travolta). That’s because, mostly, actresses find themselves almost completely out of the game once they hit 30ish – an unnecessary full stop that a lot of us would like to see removed in the future.

Denise Richards, sadly, is no different. After marrying a man she found herself in an abusive relationship with, her career climb stumbled and she was forced back down into TV roles, where she’s currently still putting in the hours.

Richards had a sparkling, American Dream-like start in life.
See full article at Den of Geek »

La Chienne | Criterion Blu-ray Review

Popular discussions of Jean Renoir tend to highlight his most renowned titles from particular periods of his career, though his greatest contributions and considerable reputation rest mainly on a handful of iconic titles from the 1930s, such as his early masterpiece Boudu Saved From Drowning (1932, remade several times in French and English, including by Paul Mazursky with Slums of Beverly Hills), and Grand Illusion (1937, notably the very first entry in Criterion’s esteemed collection).

Continue reading...
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Amazon Backs New Films From Jill Soloway, Barry Levinson, Tamara Jenkins, And More, Plus Launch First Live Show

In case you need a reminder how flush and competitive the TV landscape is at the moment: Netflix is spending $5 billion dollars on programming this year. So, if you want to keep pace, you have to throw down some cash, and that's exactly what their rivals Amazon are doing. Today it emerged that the online retailer is backing a whole new slate of feature films. From "Transparent" creator Jill Soloway (who is already brewing a new comedy for Amazon titled "I Love Dick"), the studio is developing “Ten Aker Wood,” a coming-of-age story about a woman who leaves her failing marriage and life on a pot farm, and falls in love a biker and his lifestyle. Tamara Jenkins (“The Savages,” “Slums of Beverly Hills”) is working on the drama “Private Life” about a woman in her 40s who will do anything to have a child. Meanwhile, Barry Levinson has a
See full article at The Playlist »

Jill Soloway to Write, Direct ‘Ten Aker Wood’ For Amazon Studios (Exclusive)

Jill Soloway to Write, Direct ‘Ten Aker Wood’ For Amazon Studios (Exclusive)
Transparent” creator Jill Soloway will co-write and direct “Ten Aker Wood” for Amazon Studios, Variety has learned.

The film is billed as a coming-of-age story; it centers on a woman in a failing marriage who leaves Los Angeles to live on a pot farm in Northern California. There she falls in love with a biker and embraces an outlaw lifestyle.

Soloway isn’t the only high-profile director in the Amazon stable. The studio is also working on a Barry Levinson (“Rain Man”) film about the Los Angeles comedy scene of the 1960s and ’70s. They’ve set up “Private Life,” a story about a woman in her 40s who goes to extremes to have a child, from Tamara Jenkins of “The Savages” and “Slums of Beverly Hills” fame. And they’re backing “Desired Moments,” a romantic-comedy-fantasy about a lonely TV station employee from director Tom Kuntz and writer Griffin Creech.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Natasha Lyonne Sounds Off on Orange Is the New Black's Most "Personal" Fans

  • BuzzSugar
Orange Is the New Black and American Horror Story have two of the most intense fan bases of any current TV shows, but what does it feel like to be on those shows? We recently caught up with Chloë Sevigny and Natasha Lyonne at the Sundance Film Festival, where they were promoting their drama, Antibirth, and they told us. "There's so much frenzy and attention over it," Sevigny said of Asylum, her first season on American Horror Story. "It hit such a zeitgeist. Old friends of mine on Facebook that are true weirdos loved it. I feel like there's a true weirdo audience across America that somehow are so seduced by that show." "They both have rabid fan bases that are really obsessive in kind of a fun way for us that I don't know that we've had so much of," said Lyonne, comparing Orange Is the New Black with FX's horror hit.
See full article at BuzzSugar »

The Conversation: Top 10 American Indie Filmmakers Missing in Action

No film buff wants to see a promising, or prominent filmmaker pull a disappearing act a la Terrence Malick, (though it seems he isn’t keen to repeat another lapse like the one between Days of Heaven to The Thin Red Line), but whether they’re dealing with unforeseeable professional (endless pre-production woes, writer’s block) or personal issues, sometimes there is a considerable time between projects.

With John Cameron Mitchell, Charlie Kaufman, Rebecca Miller, Patty Jenkins, Kenneth Lonergan and more recently, Barry Jenkins recently moving out of the so called “inactive” period, we decided to compile a list of the top ten American filmmakers who, for the most part, we’ve lost sight of and would like to see get back in the director’s chair again. Most of the filmmakers listed below have gone well over half a decade without a substantial movement in this category. Here is
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Natasha Lyonne Will Host Outfest Awards

Natasha Lyonne Will Host Outfest Awards
Lyonne, a 90s cult icon in everything from "But I'm a Cheerleader" to Tamara Jenkins' terrific "Slums of Beverly Hills," has resurged in Netflix's "Orange Is the New Black." In spirit of that Lgbt-aimed series, now she's hosting La nonprofit Outfest's 10th Annual Legacy Awards. As previously announced, legendary author Armistead Maupin ("Tales of the City") will be presented with the Visionary Award, Hilary Swank (“Boys Don’t Cry”) will receive the Trailblazer Award, and Levi Strauss & Co. will be awarded with the Guardian Award. This must-attend evening, usually full of stars and Lgbt celebrities and icons, goes down November 12th at the Vibiana in downtown Los Angeles. The Legacy Awards benefits the Outfest UCLA Legacy Project for Lgbt Moving Image Preservation, an invaluable project dedicated to maintaining queer cinema resources. Previous Legacy Award winners include writer-director Lee Daniels (“The Butler”), Craig Zadan and...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Indie Spotlight

We’re back with another edition of the Indie Spotlight, highlighting recent independent horror news sent our way. Today’s feature includes trailers for Zombie Hamlet, Cowboy Zombies, and Antisocial, details on an apocalyptic card game, release information for 7E, and much more:

Zombie Hamlet Trailer and Release Details: “The All-Star comedy feature film, Zombie Hamlet, will be available exclusively on DVD from Level 33 Entertainment beginning on December 31, 2013. Following a successful film festival run, the movie sets its sights on entertaining audiences everywhere that DVDs are available for rental or sale by capitalizing on a uniquely funny story and a long list of recognizable names and faces including: Travis Wester, Jason Mewes (Jay And Silent Bob Strike Back), Emmy Award winner Shelley Long (“Cheers”), Vanessa Lee Evigan, with Emmy® Award nominee John Amos (“Good Times”) and June Lockhart (“Lost In Space”).

Directed by John Murlowski, written by John McKinney, and produced by Tom Shell,
See full article at DailyDead »
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