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(1995)

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Sammy Davis Jr. ‘I’ve Gotta Be Me’

Sammy Davis Jr. ‘I’ve Gotta Be Me’
Premiering at Tiff 2017, Sammy Davis, Jr.: I’ve Gotta Be Me is the first major film documentary to examine Davis’ vast talent and his journey for identity through the shifting tides of civil rights and racial progress during 20th-century America.

Today Sammy Davis is seen primarily as part of The Rat Pack. That quartet of bad boys who sing and joke around is very much a part of time when Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin were the kings of the Las Vegas scene.

But Sammy Davis Jr. was much more than that and merely by lending his black face to that group makes The Rat Pack seem like a liberal if slightly dissolute, but a filled-with-fun group. In truth, his position with Sinatra, Martin, Peter Lawford was not all that comfortable and the path Davis had already trod before landing there was not a simple or easy one.

He
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Bradford Young Breaks Color Barrier With Oscar Nomination for ‘Arrival’

Bradford Young Breaks Color Barrier With Oscar Nomination for ‘Arrival’
Ending an 87-year drought, the Academy finally nominated its first African-American cinematographer, Bradford Young, for his dark, richly textured work on Denis Villeneuve’s science-fiction hit “Arrival.” Young had already picked awards twice at Sundance for his lensing on Dee Rees’ “Pariah” and shooting Andrew Dosunmu’s “Mother of George” and David Lowery’s “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” the same year, and he served as Ava DuVernay’s cinematographer on “Middle of Nowhere” and “Selma.” With Oscar in sight, Young spoke with Variety from London, where he is currently filming a little project unofficially known as “Han Solo,” a new chapter in the “Star Wars” franchise.

Personally and historically, what does this nomination mean to you?

It’s a tough question that I’ve been thinking about a lot. It’s always an honor when your peers recognize the hard work you put into the films that we make,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

John Turturro Talks ‘The Night Of,’ Crime Scenes, Kalief Browder

At first, they look like any other subway ad for a certain low-level New York lawyer: A middle-aged man, a cheesy font, a name — John Stone. Unless you noticed the HBO logo in the corner, you wouldn’t know it was promoting HBO’s limited series “The Night Of,” starring John Turturro as one of those low-level New York lawyers who takes on the case of a Pakistani-American college kid from Queens accused of murder (played by Riz Ahmed).

“The lady who works at our house, she was on the subway and saw it, and went to take a picture of it,” Turturro, who lives in Brooklyn, tells Variety. “A guy saw her and said, ‘Do you know that guy?’ She said, ‘Yeah, I work for him,’ and he said, ‘Is he a good lawyer?'”

John Stone was a good enough lawyer, though his client suffered possibly irreparable psychic damage from his time on Rikers Island
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Top 10 Shots of 2016

For a decade now I’ve written about the year in single images. It’s an annual tradition that started on a whim — certain shots from “No Country for Old Men” and “The Bourne Ultimatum” spurred a desire to seek out other potent imagery and chew on it — and it has developed into my own little way of adding to the usual year-in-review cavalcade.

The rise of press screeners has certainly helped me to be thorough. Re-watching the year’s movies and scrubbing them for stand-out shots I might have missed has become its own unique form of absorbing movies. Other outlets have come along and taken similar approaches, which is great, because this is as subjective as anything else. But many have bailed after giving it a go, too, which I understand: this can be sort of taxing.

But I’ve cherished it. I’ve delighted, and continue to delight,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

James Franco’s Movie Column: My Favorite Horror Movies to Watch on Halloween

  • Indiewire
James Franco’s Movie Column: My Favorite Horror Movies to Watch on Halloween
James + Semaj is a column where James Franco talks to his reverse self, Semaj, about new films. Rather than a conventional review, it is place where James and Semaj can muse about ideas that the films provoke. James loves going to the movies and talking about them. But a one-sided take on a movie, in print, might be misconstrued as a review. As someone in the industry it could be detrimental to James’s career if he were to review his peers, because unlike the book industry—where writers review other writer’s books—the film industry is highly collaborative, and a bad review of a peer could create problems. So, assume that James (and Semaj) love all these films. What they’re interested in talking about is all the ways the films inspire them, and make them think. James is me, and Semaj is the other side of me.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Good Wife’ Spinoff Adds Delroy Lindo to Cast

‘The Good Wife’ Spinoff Adds Delroy Lindo to Cast
Delroy Lino has joined the cast of the CBS All Access spinoff of “The Good Wife.” Lindo is set to play Robert Boseman, a lawyer who poaches Diane Lockhart’s associates and clients and threatens her ability to stay in business when Lockhart, played by Christine Baranski, falls upon financial hard times.

“Boseman is a character who dominates every scene, intimidates every lawyer, and is beloved by every client. He needs to look like a Chicago lawyer, but have a Shakespearian facility with language, and Delroy Lindo was really the only actor who came to mind,” said executive producers Robert and Michelle King. “Obviously, we always loved his work in ‘Get Shorty’ and ‘Clockers,’ but it really was his work in ‘Heist’ that jumps off the screen. It’s an incredible character he created and we are thrilled that Delroy agreed to come on board. Just thinking of his scenes with Christine Baranski and Cush Jumbo makes
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Black films matter – how African American cinema fought back against Hollywood

The late 80s and 90s heralded a breakthrough led by Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing and John Singleton’s Boyz N the Hood. At first, Hollywood embraced this wave of talent, then it ignored it. Now, in the wake of #OscarsSoWhite, black film is rising again

‘Black film properties may be to the 90s what the carphone was to the 80s; every studio executive has to have one,” wrote the New York Times magazine in the summer of 1991. It’s a comment that speaks volumes about both a cultural moment and its transience. The piece was titled They’ve Gotta Have Us, referring to Spike Lee’s 1986 breakthrough movie She’s Gotta Have It. The group portrait on the cover brought together an impressive collection of young, black film-makers – what has been labelled “the class of 91”. Lee was head boy, of course. By that time he was well
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'The Night Of': 5 Things We Learned

'The Night Of': 5 Things We Learned
Welcome to The Night Of's day after, when viewers are undoubtedly experiencing the slightly woozy, vaguely hungover sensation that accompanies eight weeks of investment in a TV show and the promise of a potentially earth-shaking pay-off that, in the end, can be filed under mileage-may-vary. To be fair, it was apparent very early on that this HBO miniseries wasn't likely to dominate the modern equivalent of water-cooler discussions in a way that, say, the true-crime phenomenon Making a Murderer did last winter, or the spot-the-Reagan-era-reference game that was Stranger Things
See full article at Rolling Stone »

James Franco’s Movie Column: How Richard Linklater Inspired My Work

  • Indiewire
James Franco’s Movie Column: How Richard Linklater Inspired My Work
James + Semaj is a column where James Franco talks to his reverse self, Semaj, about new films. Rather than a conventional review, it is place where James and Semaj can muse about ideas that the films provoke. James loves going to the movies and talking about them. But a one-sided take on a movie, in print, might be misconstrued as a review. As someone in the industry it could be detrimental to James’s career if he were to review his peers, because unlike the book industry—where writers review other writer’s books—the film industry is highly collaborative, and a bad review of a peer could create problems. So, assume that James (and Semaj) love all these films. What they’re interested in talking about is all the ways the films inspire them, and make them think. James is me, and Semaj is the other side of me.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Night Of is the TV Crime Drama We Need Right Now

Drawing influences from The Wire, this HBO show boldly tackles race in the face of the criminal justice system.

After a string of disappointments and a lot of drama, HBO can finally rest easy with its promising summer murder mystery series The Night Of. Based on the BBC show Criminal Justice, The Night Of follows Nasir “Nas” Khan (Riz Ahmed), a smart young Pakistani American who finds himself at the center of a police investigation after a night on the town goes horribly wrong. The show recalls the procedural aspects of Law and Order and True Detective, but operates more like The Wire in its examination of race and the criminal justice system through the eyes of the investigators and the accused. The show’s first episode, titled “The Beach,” breaks down the events of “the night of” as Nas remembers it, and then some. In true procedural fashion, we get to play detective and guess what
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

James Franco’s Movie Column: Civil War Meets Mumblecore in ‘Men Go To Battle’

  • Indiewire
James Franco’s Movie Column: Civil War Meets Mumblecore in ‘Men Go To Battle’
James + Semaj is a column where James Franco talks to his reverse self, Semaj, about new films. Rather than a conventional review, it is place where James and Semaj can muse about ideas that the films provoke. James loves going to the movies and talking about them. But a one-sided take on a movie, in print, might be misconstrued as a review. As someone in the industry it could be detrimental to James’s career if he were to review his peers, because unlike the book industry—where writers review other writer’s books—the film industry is highly collaborative, and a bad review of a peer could create problems. So, assume that James (and Semaj) love all these films. What they’re interested in talking about is all the ways the films inspire them, and make them think. James is me, and Semaj is the other side of me.
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: 'The Night Of' is the great drama HBO very badly needs right now

  • Hitfix
Review: 'The Night Of' is the great drama HBO very badly needs right now
There's his name about a minute into the opening credits of The Night Of: James Gandolfini. That Gandolfini, who died three years ago, is still listed as an executive producer on the new HBO miniseries speaks to the deal he signed way back when he was going to co-star in the project (in a role now played by John Turturro), and to his role as one of the people championing it through development. It also evokes images of a time when HBO owned the Prestige TV game outright, benevolently renting space out to would-be challengers because its position was so strong. That was a long time ago, before the rise of Netflix and all the other Peak TV players, and before HBO skidded into its current rough patch. Executives keep leaving abruptly. Recent dramas have either failed outright (the expensive, star-laden Vinyl got unrenewed last month), imploded quickly (True
See full article at Hitfix »

New Trailer For HBO’s ‘The Night Of’ With John Turturro & Riz Ahmed Says Don’t Talk To Anybody

  • The Playlist
Law and order has always made for compelling drama, and HBO has snared two of the best in the game for their upcoming miniseries “The Night Of.” Directed by Steve Zaillian (“Moneyball,” “The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo,” “Gangs Of New York“) who co-wrote the drama along with Richard Price (“The Wire,” “Clockers“) and Peter […]

The post New Trailer For HBO’s ‘The Night Of’ With John Turturro & Riz Ahmed Says Don’t Talk To Anybody appeared first on The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Why 1995 Was the Best Year in Movie History

  • Hitfix
Why 1995 Was the Best Year in Movie History
All week our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century. Click here for a complete list of our essays. When I picked this year, it was under the mistaken assumption that we were writing on the best film of a year, and not the best film year in general. But having realized the mistake, I stand by my choice. 1995 is still the best! Straight up: 1995 wins, because Todd Haynes’s “[Safe]" is still my favorite film to have come out since, Idk, I’ve been alive. It’s deeply self-conscious about genre, while still managing to not really resemble anything I’ve ever seen. It’s the perfect film about L.A.; about how space is mobilized in cinema; about the environment; about Gothic horror; about white femininity; about film bodies; about falling in love in the movies. It’s Todd Motherf*#@$^ Haynes’s best film.
See full article at Hitfix »

Child 44 review

  • Den of Geek
Tom Rob Smith's acclaimed novel Child 44 comes to the movies with Tom Hardy in the lead. Here's our review...

How does a state where 'there is no crime' handle an act like murder when it occurs not once but dozens of times? The answer is that the state – in this case, post-World War II Stalinist Russia – creates an 'official' story and buries the truth as capitalist propaganda.

That’s what happens in Child 44, the new political thriller based on the first in a trilogy of novels by Tom Rob Smith. Tom Hardy stars as Mgb agent Leo Demidov, who is busy at his job of routing out political dissidents when two major challenges come into his life: he is asked to denounce his own wife, Raisa (Noomi Rapace), as a traitor, and also stumbles upon a series of grisly child killings that seem to stretch across 20 years
See full article at Den of Geek »

LatinoBuzz: Interview with Elvis Nolasco from ABC's 'American Crime'

LatinoBuzz: Interview with Elvis Nolasco from ABC's 'American Crime'
I must have met E.O. around the winter of ‘96. He was that kid from around the way that was in Spike Lee’s Clockers. We’d catch each other in the heights here and there but not often enough. Years later I decided to make my own short film. I sent Elvis the script. He was down. We shot with a few hundred dollars on the Canon Xl (the Excalibur of its time) on the stoops, brownstones and rooftops of Harlem, New York. The film had some sweet humble success with festivals all things considering. I still don’t know how best to direct actors but Nolasco always had that razor sharp focus when it came to his craft. He made it seem effortless but I knew it came from years of discipline. He’s gone on to work with some of the best and after a few pilots that weren’t picked up,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

LatinoBuzz: Interview with Elvis Nolasco from ABC's 'American Crime'

I must have met E.O. around the winter of ‘96. He was that kid from around the way that was in Spike Lee’s Clockers. We’d catch each other in the heights here and there but not often enough. Years later I decided to make my own short film. I sent Elvis the script. He was down. We shot with a few hundred dollars on the Canon Xl (the Excalibur of its time) on the stoops, brownstones and rooftops of Harlem, New York.

The film had some sweet humble success with festivals all things considering. I still don’t know how best to direct actors but Nolasco always had that razor sharp focus when it came to his craft. He made it seem effortless but I knew it came from years of discipline. He’s gone on to work with some of the best and after a few pilots that weren’t picked up, ABC will debut "American Crime," an anthology series based on class, race & gender politics created by Academy Award-winner John Ridley, on March 5th. Fast forward, 2015, there’s nothing like seeing your homeboy’s billboard on Sunset and Vine.

LatinoBuzz: Do you recall that first moment you wanted to be an actor?

Elvis: I can honestly say that...that moment of wanting to be an actor, was a moment that found me. After many early years of dancing, it was not until I arrived at George Washington High School, where I was faced with the options of what I wanted as my extra curriculum studies. Now, the only thing on that list that came close to dancing was "Introduction to Theatre". I said "well maybe I can get to dance in this class"... (Not So). It was my drama teacher Robert Stonebridge who after the first few weeks in his class he saw something in me, that I of course did not see in myself. He challenged me to play the role of Bill Starbuck in the play The Rainmaker. From that moment on, I found my voice, my body felt something magical and new, I felt comfortable, I finally was introduced to a new form of expression, the freedom of expression, the art to play. That was the moment and I never looked back. Thank You Mr. Stonebridge.

LatinoBuzz: What was the most discouraging moment you have ever experienced?

Elvis: That's a good question. I feel that the times I've had experience those moments, it has been when I've allowed outside voices to try and deter me from my path, my passion. Those voices can be very discouraging and destructive to one's journey. Today, I make sure to listen to the voice inside me, the voice of the heart, the voice of my passion, my truth.

LatinoBuzz: Who has been the biggest influence in your life and work?

Elvis: That's a long list, however I'll narrow it down to this many... My mother, my father, who have taught me the importance of hard work in a very dignified way. My aunts and uncles, who have taught me the value of family, music, dance and history. My good friend Robert (Fileo) Lewis, who has taught me the power of unconditional love. My brothers and sisters, especially my younger brother Yanko "Valentin", who is always, and I mean always busy and relevant, I'm telling you that kid don't stop. Work wise...Spike Lee, Darnell Martin, John Ridley...And tons of many, many more...

LatinoBuzz: What's your take on the ‘Whitewashing’ Hollywood has been accused of lately?

Elvis: The Whitewash of Hollywood is not new but the broader conversation that we are having about it is. The fact that people of color are not the only ones involved in the public conversation about it, is new. That's a good thing for everyone involved. Diversity in film and television benefits society as a whole.

LatinoBuzz: You did a one-man show based on Junot Diaz’ Purlizter Prize awarded ‘The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao’ – you didn’t find that daunting at all? We are talking a very celebrated novel.

Elvis: Oscar Wao? Daunting? Nah! When this project was brought to my attention, I was immediately in and up for the challenge. I, at that time (2010) had already read Junot Diaz' previous works, had read The Brief Wondrous Life Of Oscar Wao two times, therefore I was of fan, a fan of the book and of Junot’s work. Now, having said that, to sit in a stuffy New York City basement at a theatre on 36th street with the great director Elise Thoron for two whole weeks (lost count of the hours) and together work on the adaptation of this magnificent, extraordinary and compelling Pulitzer prize winning novel...Ok, I think we can now revisit that word... ‘daunting”... Lol. We were able to narrow it down to an hour and 10 minutes and tell the beautiful story of Oscar De Leon and Yunior and audiences loved it. Truly a pleasure to take on this story on stage.

LatinoBuzz: I always have to ask this: Your dream role, dream director, dream co-star.

Elvis: Dream Role? I would say, playing Sidney Poitier on the big screen. Directors? Clint Eastwood, Denzel Washington, Lee Daniels. Co-Star? Will Smith.

Do the social media lovin’!

Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1Fozjcx

Twitter: @Eonolasco

Airing times and schedule for American Crime can be found here: http://abc.go.com/shows/american-crime

Written by Juan Caceres . LatinoBuzz is a weekly feature on SydneysBuzz that highlights Latino indie talent and upcoming trends in Latino film with the specific objective of presenting a broad range of Latino voices. Follow [At]LatinoBuzz on Twitter and Facebook
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Sony In Talks To Adapt Richard Price’s The Whites

Over the years, American novelist and screenwriter Richard Price has seen many of his works make smooth transitions from the page to the screen. His book The Wanderers was adapted by Philip Kaufman into a now-iconic coming-of-age film, and Spike Lee’s take on Clockers earned strong reviews. Additionally, Price’s work as a screenwriter has been highly successful – among his accolades are an Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay (for The Color of Money) and a Writers Guild of America Award (for HBO’s The Wire, on which he served as a writer). Now, Sony is betting on Price’s ability to deliver another strong drama by entering talks to adapt his upcoming work The Whites.

If a deal is made, super-producer Scott Rudin (Captain Phillips) will produce a film adaptation of the crime drama, the first written by Price under the pen name Harry Brandt. Set in New York City,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Script News: Shaolin, Whites, Day, Highmore

Shaolin Temple

Andrew Dominik ("Chopper," "Killing Them Softly") has come onboard to write the Justin Lin-directed China-set 3D feature "Shaolin Temple" for Perfect Storm Entertainment and Beijing Enlight Pictures. Troy Craig Poon, Bruno Wu and Wang Changtian are producing.

A remake of the 1982 film which served as Jet Li's screen debut, the story is set in the period between China's Sui and Tang Dynasties. When the Tang emperor is betrayed by one of his generals, the son of one of his slave workers escapes to the temple, trains in kung fu, and sets out to kill the traitor. [Source: Deadline]

The Whites

Sony Pictures is in negotiations to option the film rights to "Clockers" and "The Wanderers" author Richard Price's upcoming crime novel "The Whites" for Scott Rudin to produce.

The story follows detective Billy Graves, whose tainted past comes back to haunt him when he takes on a
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Blu-ray Review: ‘Spike Lee Joint Collection’ Releases Are Solid Starting Point

Who of our modern filmmakers will justify lavish, career-spanning box sets in the next generation (presuming there is such a thing and we’re not 100% digital)? We’ve seen Oliver Stone, Martin Scorsese, and Alfred Hitchcock sets in recent years but who will get the same treatment in ten or twenty years?

One man who I’d love to see dissected from first film to last is the essential Spike Lee. He has had an undeniably spotty career with films both considered masterpieces and complete failures. But Spike is always working, always trying something new, always willing to challenge himself and the viewer. Did his “Oldboy” remake work? No. He picks himself up, dusts himself off, and gets back to it. Spike has been everywhere lately, promoting and discussing the 25th anniversary of his masterpiece, “Do the Right Thing,” and so someone figured it was a good time to release
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »
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