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12 Movies to Watch After You See ‘The Fate of the Furious’

Assorted recommendations inspired by the multifarious sequel.Sorry, Marky Mark, but you’ve already got a car-based franchise.

By the time you’re done watching The Fate of the Furious, you’re likely to have forgotten some of its distinctly differing parts. The sequel begins as one thing then becomes another and another and another, delivering a thrilling mix of action sequences that don’t quite fit together as a fluid and cohesive whole.

I was reminded of a number of dissimilar movies while watching the eighth Fast and the Furious installment, so this week’s list of recommendations could be an even more mixed assortment than usual. But I have no interest in prescribing bad-tasting medicine like The Game Plan in response to Dwayne Johnson’s soccer dad scene. I’m also ignoring Jason Statham’s cheeky insult reminding Johnson and us all of his dumb Hercules movie.

Instead of going with the usual chronological trip
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The Infiltrator | Review

  • ioncinema
Undercover Blues: Furman’s By-the-Numbers Thrills Enhanced by Cranston

Certain performers manage an incalculable hook into material otherwise hampered by cliché and familiarity, something accomplished with blissful ease by Bryan Cranston in the 1986 set The Infiltrator, which glances at an undercover agent attempting to take down the Medellin cartel in South Florida via a money laundering operation.

Continue reading...
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Bond, Kubrick Designer Ken Adam Has Died

Oscar winning production designer Ken Adam died today in London at the age of 95 according to The BBC.

Adam is most famous for creating the iconic and sprawling lairs of the supervillains who populated the Sean Connery and Roger Moore-era James Bond films. His designs included the Crab Key complex in "Dr. No," the Fort Knox interiors on "Goldfinger," the volcano lair of "You Only Live Twice," Stromberg's supertanker and Atlantis sets in "The Spy Who Loved Me," and Drax's space station in "Moonraker". He also did the production design on "Thunderball" and "Diamonds Are Forever".

Adams' work extended well beyond the Bond franchise though, such as two films in the anti-Bond Harry Palmer film series with Michael Caine - "The Ipcress File" and "Funeral in Berlin". He was a favorite of Stanley Kubrick following his design of the famous war room for "Dr. Strangelove". He was offered "2001" but turned it down,
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Crazy Triple Features: Olive Films’ Voodoo Man, Undercover Blues & Phase IV Blurays

As weird as it can be, I love to take three films that have Nothing to do with each other and watch them back to back. Sure, nothing beats binge watching any of my favorite franchises like the Halloween, Friday The 13th or A Nightmare On Elm Street films, but this odd triple feature approach I think really encapsulates how all across the board my taste in movies can be. Thanks to the great gang at Olive Films, these Crazy Triple Features nights that I have are well stocked, due to their output not being confined to just one genre. This week, I’ve chosen three recent releases of theirs and to say these films are different from each other would be an understatement, but let’s jump in regardless!

1.) Voodoo Man (1944)

The first film to grace the Crazy Triple Features entry, is the 1944 Bela Lugosi horror film, Voodoo Man.
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Dave Chappelle Talks Bill Cosby and Police Brutality During Stand-up Performance

  • Vulture
Dave Chappelle Talks Bill Cosby and Police Brutality During Stand-up Performance
Dave Chappelle's set at New Orleans's Saenger Theater on Friday night was entirely topical, with a heavy focus on Bill Cosby and police brutality. Chappelle referred to Hannibal Burress, who opened for him the night before, as "the guy who accidentally killed Bill Cosby," a nod Burress's role in resurfacing multiple sexual assault accusations against the comedian. (As you may have heard, they've since been joined by several other allegations.) According to Times-Picayune reporter Jarvis DeBerry, Chappelle also talked about being choked by a police officer in New Orleans when he was filming a movie for Undercover Blues: Chappelle said he was working on his "first movie" here in New Orleans. He was playing a mugger, he said. He was dressed for the part. The movie set was surrounded with police tape. He ducked under it. Then a police officer set upon him and immediately started choking him.
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Dave Chappelle Says He Was Choked by a Police Officer in New Orleans

  • Vulture
Dave Chappelle Says He Was Choked by a Police Officer in New Orleans
At a stand-up set in New Orleans last night witnessed by journalists from the New Orleans Times-Picayune, Dave Chappelle told the crowd he'd been choked by a police officer while working in the city decades earlier. Chappelle was riffing on the death of Eric Garner when he mentioned that he too had been the victim of police violence. The comedian claimed he was stepping off the set of one his first movies — likely 1993's Undercover Blues, in which he played a mugger — when a police officer came up behind him and immediately put him in a chokehold. Chappelle said the cop only let go after a female crew member intervened. When she told him Chappelle was an actor, the officer reportedly asked her, "Why didn't he say something?" And here's the kicker: Chapelle told the audience he wasn't even surprised by the chokehold. As a black man in America, he said,
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Happy Birthday To Stanley Tucci, Who Is Still So Hot

  • The Backlot
Happy 53rd birthday to Stanley Tucci, who started out his career playing Italian-American tough guys but is probably best-known for his roles in nuttier Meryl Streep fare like The Devil Wears Prada and Julie and Julia, not to mention his Oscar-nominated turn in The Lovely Bones. He was also gay and jilted in Burlesque, which I hope you all remember.

And more importantly, I hope you remember he is so damn hot.

Here are my favorite five examples of his legendary hotness.

#1: This Levi’s ad where he is scorching.

2. Right here. Oh yes, right here. (I think it’s from his short-lived CBS series 3 lbs.)

3. This awesomely gaudy getup from Shall We Dance

4. This magazine cover, oh yes yes yes.

5. And oh yes, this still from Undercover Blues.

Happy 53 to Miranda Priestley’s unflappable second banana! What’s your choice for Tucci’s hottest act?

The post Happy Birthday To Stanley Tucci,
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10 Scenes We Love From ‘True Romance’

Tony Scott‘s True Romance is probably one of my top ten all-time favorite movies, which is kind of weird since Badlands is one of my top five all-time favorite films. Or maybe it’s appropriate that this is the case. I’m sure that one of the reasons I fell in love with this movie is because of how directly it’s inspired by and references the earlier Terrence Malick film. Notice I make the distinction between movies and films. Scott made movies, Malick makes films. Scott also made a movie I like that directly references another of my all-time favorite films (Enemy of the State –> The Conversation). I was sad when Scott died particularly because I was hoping he’d eventually cover all my top shelf titles (just imagine what he could have done with Duck Soup!). Then again, maybe he’d have just redone himself, the way he did with Domino, which
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

'Footloose' Then and Now

  • NextMovie
Seventeen years after the original "Footloose" inspired audiences around the world to kick off their Sunday shoes, Craig Brewer's "Footloose" remake arrives in theaters this Friday, October 14.

Although Brewer and his filmmaking forebear, Herbert Ross, share an affection for music-driven movies, it remains to be seen whether the director of "Hustle & Flow" and "Black Snake Moan" will go on to Ross's highs of "The Secret of My Success," or the lows of "Undercover Blues."

In the meantime, we took a look at both theatrical versions of this iconic story in order to see what they have in common, and where Brewer might have cut a little bit loose.

The Location: Although both films are set in a town called Bomont, the '84 film takes place in Utah, which actually has a town with that name, while the '11 film relocates the conflict to the South, fabricating a Bomont, Georgia.
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What I Watched, What You Watched: Installment #93

I'm here in Cannes and prepared this week's "What I Watched" last Sunday in preparation for the trip so I only have one movie this time around, but I am about to get to work on three reviews for movies I just saw back-to-back-to-back... those movies being The Artist, Take Shelter and Martha Marcy May Marlene... So look for those in the next five hours, for now here's what I watched, share your week's worth of movie watching in the comments.

Undercover Blues (1993) Quick Thoughts: For whatever reason, my girlfriend got this film stuck in her head and it just so happened to be available on Netflix Instant so the night before I left for Cannes this was our evening entertainment. Surprisingly enough, it's a pretty funny film with rather comical performances from Dennis Quaid and Kathleen Turner, but the best comes from Stanley Tucci as Muerte.

It's directed by Herbert Ross (Footloose,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

"Nobody's going to keep me from working in this town!"

Every once in a while I miss Kathleen Turner so much I could spit. I don't even care that my infrequent posts about her fall on mostly deaf ears. Her superstardom was shortlived but she remains one of my all time favorites.

I accidentally ended up watching that old Steve Martin silliness The Man With Two Brains (1983) the other day and I marvelled first at how funny it still was (I think I had assumed it was more sketch funny than movie-length funny but I was laughing throughout) and then how it accidentally foretold the entire Kathleen Turner Story when the Kathleen Turner Story had only barely begun. The Man With Two Brains was just her second feature, a comic twist if you will of her debut in Body Heat.

In this comedy she is introduced as a murderous femme fatale (Body Heat. Check). She's barely been introduced when she's
See full article at FilmExperience »

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