Guilty as Sin (1993) - News Poster

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Daredevil Season 2, Jessica Jones Season 1 Come to Disc in Aug

  • Comicmix
Raw, riveting and relentlessly compelling, Marvel’s Jessica Jones: The Complete First Season ignites a firestorm of suspense cloaked in the haze of a noir-inspired slow burn. Haunted by a tragedy that broke her world apart, Jessica Jones settles in Hell’s Kitchen, New York City, and opens her own detective agency, called Alias Investigations, with the hope of rebuilding her life and keeping the lights on in her apartment. She discovers that the source of her trauma, a mind-controlling sociopath named Kilgrave, has resurfaced, forcing her to use her gifts as a private eye to track him down before he causes more damage to her life or to anyone else.

The complete first season of the Netflix original series Marvel’s Jessica Jones is available to own on Blu-ray™ and DVD on Aug. 22 with 13 exciting episodes for fans to add to their libraries.

Cast: Krysten Ritter (Big Eyes
See full article at Comicmix »

Daredevil season 2 episode 12 viewing notes: The Dark At The End Of The Tunnel

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Elektra's backstory comes into focus in the penultimate episode of Daredevil season 2, which continues to deliver...

Please remember to keep spoilers for future episodes out of the comments!

This was kind of a strange episode. Perhaps motivated by the need to wrap up Frank’s storyline without having it steal time from the end of Matt’s, this instalment sees Frank finally track down and confront the guy who made his life a misery: The Blacksmith. And it turns out to be Colonel Schoonover, Frank’s old commander. That guy we met for like three minutes that one time.

I’m probably not alone in thinking this isn’t a particularly satisfying reveal, though it also isn’t like they had anywhere else to go with it because this series wasn’t exactly stuffed with characters who had any kind of personal connection to Frank. I’d
See full article at Den of Geek »

Daredevil season 2 episode 11 viewing notes: .380

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With spoilers, we take a look at Daredevil season two episode 11, .380...

Please remember to keep spoilers for future episodes out of the comments!

As the show reaches its climax, there’s a definite sense that the plot’s speeding up again after a few slower (though still gripping) episodes. So let’s tackle the various threads in turn.

First, The Hand’s attack on the hospital. A great fight scene, and one with a genuinely unexpected ending as the blood-bank rescues turn out to be either brainwashed, mystically controlled or in on the whole Hand thing. We see evidence that one of the Hand ninjas appears to have been autopsied already in the past, giving us a slight nudge towards considering their claims about being able to grant immortality. And although Claire’s bosses are mad about her actions, they get paid off, forcing her to quit in moral outrage.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Daredevil season 2 episode 10 viewing notes: The Man In The Box

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The mysticism is coming thick and fast in Daredevil season two, which lays groundwork for Iron Fist and a possible season 3 tease...

Please remember to keep spoilers for future episodes out of the comments!

To be honest, I wasn’t expecting the Kingpin to be back so soon after last episode, but I’m glad he is because the face-to-face confrontation of Murdock and Fisk is probably my favourite scene of the series yet. Seeing Matt’s confidence utterly undone by the sudden fury of the Kingpin as he reveals this extent of his control, slamming Matt’s surprised face into the table while the guard looks the other way was utterly fantastic. Clearly, it was a bad move trying to go through Vanessa to get to Fisk.

Claire’s reappearance is always welcome, and I’m enjoying the way her own arc is moving through the various Marvel shows.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Daredevil season 2 episode 9 viewing notes: Seven Minutes In Heaven

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More intrigue, more thrilling fights in contained spaces and more spoilers in our viewing notes for Daredevil season 2 episode 9...

Please remember to keep spoilers for future episodes out of the comments!

While you can completely see the creative decisions that went into keeping Wilson Fisk mostly off-camera for this series, this episode can’t help but make you wonder whether it was the right choice. Starting with a flashback to Fisk entering prison after his trial, we see how he applies his own superpower – the ability to exercise control – to the point where he’s able to get away with basically anything.

In particular, it was fun watching him play off The Punisher. Unlike Matt, Frank isn’t interested in verbal jousting and Fisk seems to respect his single-mindedness. I’m not sure that translates well into Fisk changing his mind as soon as he realises he
See full article at Den of Geek »

Daredevil Season 2 Episode 9 Review – ‘Seven Minutes in Heaven’

Ricky Church reviews the ninth episode of Daredevil season 2…

Earlier this season Daredevil once again got a fight in a tight hallway outnumbered by a bunch of thugs. It was a very well filmed and choreographed scene, showcasing Daredevil’s fighting skills, but this time The Punisher got his own hallway fight scene and showed just how brutally effective he could be when pushed into a corner.

First off, after ‘Guilty as Sin’s cliffhanger, it was great to see Vincent D’Onofrio again and with such a prominent role in this episode. He was one of the standout aspects of Daredevil’s first season and it was very exciting to see him in such a drastically different environment. Despite the change in his circumstances, Fisk still manipulated events and has not given up on his quest to rule the city. D’Onofrio again excelled in selling the character’s charisma and Machiavellian intelligence,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Daredevil Season 2 Episode 8 Review – ‘Guilty As Sin’

Martin Carr reviews the eighth episode of Daredevil season 2…

Once Elektra crossed that line in episode seven there was a wedge driven between Nelson, Page and Murdock the size of a Buick. Testimonies are thrown out, friendships are in tatters, while there is the small matter of that forty storey chasm at the end of ‘Semper Fidelis’. Aside from this we have an open and shut multiple homicide murder trial, with a man more than aware of his wrong doing.

As relationships splinter, loyalties are tested and district attorney Reyes begins circling the wagons we open on ‘Guilty As Sin’. Which throws up a few big surprises, one large slab of long term narrative exposition to lay some structural groundwork, as well as one blinding slap fest. Beyond that Daredevil drifts into the realms of Aaron Sorkin courtroom mainstay A Few Good Men, minus any implication of not being able to handle the truth.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Daredevil season 2: examining Jon Bernthal's Punisher

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With the help of the hugely talented Jon Bernthal, Marvel has finally done tragic and brutal on-screen justice to The Punisher. Spoilers...

This article contains major spoilers for the whole of Daredevil seasons one and two.

It's only been a week since Netflix released season two of Marvel's Daredevil, but lots of fans and viewers would already declare Jon Bernthal's take on Frank Castle to be the best screen version of the Punisher to date. He's not even the principal antagonist, but he steals scenes left and right all the way through the season.

Following the acclaimed portrayal of Wilson Fisk last season, new showrunners Douglas Petrie and Marco Ramirez provide a more humanised spin on the character than is traditionally depicted in the comics, without having him get pally with his neighbours, like the 2004 film did, or having him indiscriminately blow up free runners with a bazooka,
See full article at Den of Geek »

'Daredevil' season 2: Reviewing every episode

  • Hitfix
'Daredevil' season 2: Reviewing every episode
Last week, I published my review of the first half of Daredevil season 2. Over the weekend, I watched the remaining six episodes, and I have some more thoughts — first general, non-spoiler ones, followed by more specific and spoiler-filled thoughts on each episode — coming up just as soon as I inherit the tapes with the car... In some ways, the back half of the season was an improvement over the first, thanks to the arrival of two strong characters, and the rapid shift away from a few story threads (mob war, Reyes' vendetta against the law firm) that never worked in the first place. But in others, it continued many of the problems I had through the first seven hours. It was still too cluttered and flabby, while Daredevil himself remained one of the least interesting parts of a show that bore his name. Also, the later episodes focused more on Elektra than Punisher,
See full article at Hitfix »

Hk FilMart: Fox Channels ‘Guilty’ of Move Into Asian Mini-Series

Hk FilMart: Fox Channels ‘Guilty’ of Move Into Asian Mini-Series
21st Century Fox’s Hong Kong-based pay-tv group Fox Intl. Channels is to back “Guilty As Sin,” an Asian mini-series that will begin production later this year.

Budgets on the 6-8 episode series, which will tell a contemporary Hong Kong-set story, are expected to be around Us$1 million per episode.

Production is led by former Warner Bros. executive Mia Hsia.

Later in the year Fic expects to green light another, untitled “Asian scale” series, about an Asian-American sniper. It will likely be shot in English and destined for a regional or global audience.

The move into original content production by pay-tv groups is a well-established trend in North America and Europe, but is relatively new in Asia.

The Fic initiative is spearheaded by Cora Yim, senior VP of content and head of its Chinese-language entertainment. The series will air first on Fic’s Star Chinese Movies Channel.

“We have
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Jon Secada Says Don Johnson 'Owes Me Money' [Exclusive Video]

Jon Secada, who writes about the hardships he faced breaking into the music industry in his book Secada: A New Day, reveals that Don Johnson still owes him an unpaid debt from decades ago.

Jon Secada Says Don Johnson Owes Him Money

Back in the 80s, before Secada went on to become a Grammy-winning singer and songwriter, he was a struggling artist. To make money on the side, he’d coach for an hourly rate. One of his clients in those early days was Miami Vice star Don Johnson.

"We got the call by somebody that was working with Don Johnson," Secada told uInterview exclusively. "He was doing a duet in Spanish. They needed someone to coach him though the song. He was doing the duet with a really well known Mexican singer. I got the job. I got the call. I did the job, and I helped him with the song.
See full article at Uinterview »

Tribeca Film Review: ‘Alex of Venice’

Tribeca Film Review: ‘Alex of Venice’
As so many mainstream films venture further into the screamingly implausible, indie efforts veer toward the understated and mundane, their realism obviating any perceived need for drama. But the pleasures of well-observed characters and small epiphanies are undeniable, and “Alex of Venice,” actor Chris Messina’s directing debut, is amply supplied with both, thanks to Mary Elizabeth Winstead’s extraordinary performance: Registering profound shocks with slight ripples rather than big emotions, she quietly commands attention. But the film around her proceeds more unevenly, determined more by actors’ rhythms than by the structure of the whole. The result will attract connoisseurs of the laid-back.

When Alex (Winstead), a workaholic lawyer for an environmental group, is suddenly abandoned by her stay-at-home artist/surfer hubby, George (Messina), her carefully ordered existence begins to fall apart. On top of her huge caseload occasioned by an important trial, she now bears full responsibility for the needs of her 10-year-old son,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Films Of Sidney Lumet: A Retrospective

  • The Playlist
It has been a year since Sidney Lumet passed away on April 9, 2011. Here is our retrospective on the legendary filmmaker to honor his memory. Originally published April 15, 2011.

Almost a week after the fact, we, like everyone that loves film, are still mourning the passing of the great American master Sidney Lumet, one of the true titans of cinema.

Lumet was never fancy. He never needed to be, as a master of blocking, economic camera movements and framing that empowered the emotion and or exact punctuation of a particular scene. First and foremost, as you’ve likely heard ad nauseum -- but hell, it’s true -- Lumet was a storyteller, and one that preferred his beloved New York to soundstages (though let's not romanticize it too much, he did his fair share of work on studio film sets too as most TV journeyman and early studio filmmakers did).

His directing career stretched well over 50 years,
See full article at The Playlist »

Don Johnson on Sidney Lumet: 'Sidney's abundant energy and creative consciousness lives on.'

Don Johnson on Sidney Lumet: 'Sidney's abundant energy and creative consciousness lives on.'
Don Johnson, who starred in Sidney Lumet’s 1993 film Guilty As Sin, has released a statement to EW about the late director, who passed away Saturday at the age of 86. Said Johnson in his statement: “I’m saddened to learn of the great Sidney Lumet’s passing. I believe Sidney’s abundant energy and creative consciousness lives on. Of course through his vast contribution to our art during his life, but also beyond, into whatever form his consciousness becomes. And through the millions of lives he touched with his passion, love and kindness. So long Sidney. With love and gratitude,
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Sidney Lumet was the quintessential New York filmmaker, a prince of the city who captured our flawed souls

Sidney Lumet was the quintessential New York filmmaker, a prince of the city who captured our flawed souls
Few, at this point, would dispute that the 1970s is the single greatest decade in American filmmaking after World War II. If you were to list the landmark movies that were central to the decade’s pop-cultural identity, that list would surely include the following three films: Serpico (1973), Dog Day Afternoon (1975), and Network (1976). Those three classics — made, bang bang bang, more or less right in a row — were all directed by the same man, Sidney Lumet, who died today at 86. Yet Lumet, one of the most exciting American filmmakers who ever lived, occupies, to this moment, a unique and slightly
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Film Panels at Afm!

The 2009 American Film Market today announced its schedule of seminars and conferences to be held between Nov. 4 and 11. Celebrating its 30th year, the Afm will showcase panels on film financing opportunities, local and international distribution trends, marketing strategies and digital technologies. The sessions will include film executives, producers, writers, directors, distributors, financiers and attorneys. This year’s seminars and conferences will include the annual “Afm Finance Conference” on Friday, Nov. 6; “Pitch Me!” on Saturday, Nov. 7; “No Direction Home – Changing Indie Distribution Strategies” on Sunday, Nov. 8; “Writing for the Genre World” on Monday, Nov. 9; “Case Study: How to Package and Finance Your Independent Project Overseas” on Monday, Nov. 9; and “The New Hollywood Movie Studio, New Media and Social Networking” on Tuesday, Nov. 10.

Programming the seminars and conferences will be the American Society of Cinematographers, British Academy of Film & Television Arts/Los Angeles, Directors Guild of America, Film Independent, Hong Kong Trade Development Council,
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

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