Cape Fear (1991) - News Poster

(1991)

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Canon Of Film: ‘The Night of the Hunter’

In this week’s edition of Canon Of Film, we take a look at Charles Laughton‘s one-off masterpiece, ‘The Night of the Hunter‘. For the story behind the genesis of the Canon, you can click here.

The Night Of The Hunter (1955)

Director: Charles Laughton

Screenplay: James Agee based on the novel by David Grubb

Although he acted in over 50 films during his illustrious acting career, Charles Laughton only got to direct one film in his lifetime, but he made it count, and it stands as a strange, unique essential film that’s part ‘Huckleberry Finn’, and the rest, this surrealistic nightmare with a tone that seems to directly influence modern horror/slasher film directors like Wes Craven, John Carpenter and Tobe Hooper. ‘The Night of the Hunter,’ frightened the hell out of me on my first viewing, and still continues to shake me on subsequent ones. It’s at
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

Antalya Festival: Juliette Lewis on Harvey Weinstein, Acting with Robert De Niro, ‘Natural Born Killers’

Antalya Festival: Juliette Lewis on Harvey Weinstein, Acting with Robert De Niro, ‘Natural Born Killers’
Antalya, Turkey — When asked whether she’s had trouble along the lines of the alleged sexual assaults of Harvey Weinstein, Juliette Lewis said producers were too frightened of her, even at age 18, to try anything.

“I scared everyone,” she told fans at the Antalya Film Fest. “Even at 18, people thought I might blow their head off. It’s a good power to have.”

Speaking to an audience who had just seen “Cape Fear,” the 1991 Martin Scorsese film that launched her career, Lewis added, “In any field, it’s nice when things get revealed. It’s important for any line of work that people get found out for their crimes.”

Having received the key to the city from Antalya’s mayor at the fest’s opening gala Saturday, Lewis reflected on the many lessons she gleaned from filming with Robert De Niro, Nick Nolte and Robert Mitchum.

“I was 18 when I did ‘Cape Fear’ but I’m playing
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Christopher Walken, Juliette Lewis to Be Honored at Antalya Film Festival

Christopher Walken, Juliette Lewis to Be Honored at Antalya Film Festival
Turkey's Antalya film festival will present Christopher Walken with an honorary lifetime achievement award this year.

Walken, who won an Oscar for his performance in Michael Cimino's The Deer Hunter, will receive an Honorary Golden Orange Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Art of Film, organizers said Tuesday.

Meanwhile, Juliette Lewis, who was nominated for an Academy Award for her part in Cape Fear, will be presented with the key to the city of Antalya by Mayor Menderes Turel.

The actors will be joined by other prominent guests at the Mediterranean resort for the festival. Japanese actor and Jim Jarmusch...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Curious Languor of Robert Mitchum

  • MUBI
Everyone notices the eyes first, languid, those of a somnambulist. Robert Mitchum, calm and observant, is a presence that, through passivity, enamors a viewer. His face is as effulgent as moonlight. The man smolders, with that boozy, baritone voice, seductive and soporific, a cigarette perched between wispy lips below which is a chin cleft like a geological fault. He’s slithery with innuendo. There’s an effortless allure to it all, a mix of malaise and braggadocio, a cocksure machismo and a hint of fragility. He’s ever-cool, a paradox, “radiating heat without warmth,” as Richard Brody said. A poet, a prodigious lover and drinker, a bad boy; his penchant for marijuana landed him in jail, and in the photographs from his two-month stay he looks like a natural fit. He sits, wrapped in denim, legs spread wide, hair shiny and slick, holding a cup of coffee. His mouth is
See full article at MUBI »

Flashback: 'The Ben Stiller Show' Turns 25! Why the Actor Laughed at Winning an Emmy for the Series

Flashback: 'The Ben Stiller Show' Turns 25! Why the Actor Laughed at Winning an Emmy for the Series
On Sept. 27, 1992, The Ben Stiller Show premiered on Fox, showcasing the titular star’s now well-known talent for emulating celebrities and crafting original characters. The sketch comedy series was abruptly canceled before its first season finished airing, but almost a year after it debuted, the show won an Emmy for Outstanding Writing in a Variety or Music Program.

“We had no idea,” Stiller told Et backstage at the 45th Primetime Emmy Awards. Apparently, none of the show’s writers had attended the ceremony with the notion they might beat out comedy institutions such as Saturday Night Live and Late Night with David Letterman. At some point leading up to the night, Stiller thought maybe he should put together a few words, just in case. “And then at the last minute, I thought, You know, I'm not gonna prepare a speech, because I'll feel like such a jerk when I don't win.”

Created by [link
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Horror Highlights: Nitehawk Cinema’s October Programming, Red Christmas Clip, Web Of The Spider Blu-ray

  • DailyDead
Brooklyn's own Nitehawk Cinema has announced their programming guide for October and it includes Mario Bava's Kill Baby, Kill, Black Sabbath, and so much more. Also: check out a clip from Red Christmas before its home media release on October 17th, and we also have details on the Blu-ray release of Web of the Spider.

Nitehawk Cinema's October Programming Revealed: To learn about the October programming at Brooklyn's Nitehawk Cinema, read the details below or visit them online.

“New Horror

We are in the midst of a horror film resurgence. A significant group of contemporary horror films made in the past couple of years is reminiscent of the socio-political classics of the 1960s and 1970s in that they are boldly confronting the terrifying undercurrent of life today. Like their predecessors, these films tackle class, gender identity, and race in a way that shows us both where we are and how far we,
See full article at DailyDead »

Martin Scorsese to Teach First-Ever Online Filmmaking Class

Martin Scorsese to Teach First-Ever Online Filmmaking Class
Legendary filmmaker Martin Scorsese is launching an internet-based course in making movies — his first foray into e-learning.

The Oscar-winning director will debut the class in early 2018 through online-education startup MasterClass. The class costs $90 for unlimited access to more than 20 video lessons; pre-enrollment is available starting Friday at masterclass.com/ms.

In addition to the videos, Scorsese’s MasterClass course will include a downloadable workbook with lesson recaps and supplemental material. Students enrolled in the class will be able to upload video questions to Scorsese, who will provide feedback to select students.

“I was excited by this project because it gave me a chance to pass down my own inspirations and experiences and practices and evolutions,” Scorsese said in a statement, “not as a blueprint for how to make movies but as a guidepost, an offering to young people attempting to find their own way.”

Over a 50-plus career, the New York City native has produced a legion
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: How Jessica Lange Made Conniving Joan Crawford Sympathetic — Career Watch

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: How Jessica Lange Made Conniving Joan Crawford Sympathetic — Career Watch
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Jessica Lange, who’s at the height of powers at age 68, revealing depths of emotion as fading Golden Age star Joan Crawford in FX’s mighty Emmy contender “Feud: Bette and Joan.”

Bottom Line: Jessica Lange has matured from a gorgeous movie ingenue to a theater and screen character actress with extraordinary range who keeps surprising audiences with what she can make them feel.

Career Peaks: From the start, Lange impressed people even when she was in the clutches of the Dino De Laurentiis incarnation of “Kong Kong.” She followed that up with her performance as a sexy waitress who seduces Jack Nicholson on a kitchen table in Bob Rafelson’s “The Postman Always Rings Twice” (1981) and with a weighty dramatic role as the depressed
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: How Jessica Lange Made Conniving Joan Crawford Sympathetic — Career Watch

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: How Jessica Lange Made Conniving Joan Crawford Sympathetic — Career Watch
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Jessica Lange, who’s at the height of powers at age 68, revealing depths of emotion as fading Golden Age star Joan Crawford in FX’s mighty Emmy contender “Feud: Bette and Joan.”

Bottom Line: Jessica Lange has matured from a gorgeous movie ingenue to a theater and screen character actress with extraordinary range who keeps surprising audiences with what she can make them feel.

Career Peaks: From the start, Lange impressed people even when she was in the clutches of the Dino De Laurentiis incarnation of “Kong Kong.” She followed that up with her performance as a sexy waitress who seduces Jack Nicholson on a kitchen table in Bob Rafelson’s “The Postman Always Rings Twice” (1981) and with a weighty dramatic role as the depressed
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Back In The Day: The 10 Best Horror Movies From The 90s

If the ’90s taught us anything, it’s that Tamagotchis were way harder to keep alive than we first anticipated, Edward Furlong’s bangs were cooler than a liquid-metal shape-shifting cucumber and those slap bracelets could severely reduce circulation to your fingers if left on for too long (it was totally worth it, though).

The ’90s ruled. Not only did they introduce us to Pogs, rollerblades, Ring Pops and Angelica’s spine-chilling nightmare sequences from Rugrats (oh god, no), but they also introduced us to a multitude of wicked and wonderful horror flicks, too. So, for your reading pleasure, we’ve separated the weak from the chaff and hand-picked a selection of the best horror movies that went on to define a decade. Before we kick off though, we’d just like to touch on a few honourable mentions.

We really wanted to include Stephen King’s It, however, it
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Martin Scorsese and Leonardo DiCaprio Aim to Shoot ‘Killers of the Flower Moon’ Next Year

It was just a few days ago we learned that next month Martin Scorsese would begin directing Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Joe Pesci, Harvey Keitel, Bobby Cannavale, and the recently-added Ray Romano in his long-gestating crime epic The Irishman. With that Netflix production set to continue to the end of the year, it was reasonable to imagine much of 2018 would find Scorsese and Thelma Schoonmaker in the editing room. However, it looks like we may get another new Scorsese film sooner than expected.

Speaking to Variety, Scorsese’s long-time production designer Dante Ferretti says that the goal is to begin shooting their adaptation of Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI this spring. Based on the book from David Grann, the author behind The Lost City of Z, Eric Roth (Forrest Gump, The Good Shepherd) has penned the script that follows
See full article at The Film Stage »

Tamed Aliens, Harmonic Nuns and a Leather Catsuit: Strange Tales from 1992’s Summer of Cinema

Author: Cai Ross

The summer movie season of 1992 opened under a cloud; a dark cloud from the still-smouldering buildings that had burned to the ground during the La riots in April. Racial tension after the disastrous acquittal of Rodney King’s uniformed attackers had reached an all-time high and Hollywood appealed for calm.

Thus, in a touchingly bold demonstration of selfless generosity, Walter Hill’s unremarkable urban thriller, The Looters, was hastily withdrawn and held back until Christmas, re-christened Trespass (memorably starring two Bills – Paxton and Sadler – and a pair of Ices – T and Cube). Elsewhere, it was business as usual.

The Rodney King affair was briefly alluded to in Lethal Weapon 3, the second-biggest hit of the summer and one of only a handful of ‘sure things’ on the menu. Though there were mutterings about the dominance of sequels in the summer movie season, there were weird things afoot in most of the other returnees. Aside from Lethal Weapon 3 – which was essentially a watered down Lethal Weapon 2 with too much added Joe Pesci – the rest of the sequels veered off into strange tangents, with varying results.

Alien 3, for example strayed dangerously far from the template set down by the first two classics. Bravely, it has to be said, David Fincher tried to create a quasi-religious epic, following Scott’s horror movie and Cameron’s war film. Latterly, Fincher’s frustrations and behind-the-scenes interferences became legendary, but audiences didn’t click with his compromised vision and it became the first in a long line of Alien movies to fall a bit flat.

Another major sequel, Honey, I Blew Up The Baby was in fact the complete opposite of 1989’s Honey, I Shrunk The Kids, culminating in the spectacle of a 99 foot toddler stomping through Las Vegas. It was directed without enthusiasm by Grease director Randal Kleiser, reminding audiences once again why no one remembers who directed Grease.

It wasn’t just sequels that dared to be different. One of the strangest mainstream offerings of the year was Robert Zemeckis’s black comedy, Death Becomes Her, which might have been a delicious satire on America’s vain obsession with cosmetic surgery if only Bruce Willis had stopped shouting at everyone like he was trying to prevent a plane crash.

Back in the ‘90s, much more so than today, comedies were a vital part of the summer success story – an inexpensive sop for the grown-ups while their teenage kids watched things explode in Screen 7. There were high hopes for Steve Martin and Goldie Hawn’s Housesitter, which was only a medium-sized hit, despite the bit where Steve Martin sings ‘Tura Lura Lura’ to his dad, and the other bit when his falls over his couch.

Boomerang was a bigger hit and restored some credibility to Eddie Murphy’s career after the crippling one-two punches of Harlem Nights and Another 48 Hours. It was also responsible for one of the great ironic ‘First Dance At a Wedding’ songs, Boys II Men’s The End of The Road.

Nicolas Cage embarked on a three year long career as a romantic comedy star with the rather wonderful Honeymoon in Vegas, famed for its skydiving Elvis finale. Tom Hanks and his Big director Penny Marshall reteamed to great success with wartime baseball comedy A League of Their Own, which also saw Geena Davis giving a star performance and Madonna giving a bearable one. “There’s no crying in baseball!!!” was probably the most quoted line of the summer.

As with City Slickers in 1991, comedy provided the biggest sleeper hit of the summer: Sister Act, with Whoopi Goldberg excelling as a murder witness hiding out in a convent. As with City Slickers, an unwise sequel was hastily made and hastily forgotten. The original though, was the sixth biggest film of the year and is still going strong as a west-end show to this day.

It wasn’t just the many and varied comic tastes of adults that were appeased; semi-literate young people were also provided for by Encino Man (or California Man as we knew it, since we don’t know where Encino is. It’s in California). Noted for Brendan Fraser’s first stab at the big time, this grungy caveman caper will be of interest to young contemporary archeologists keen to investigate who or what Pauly Shore was.

Teenagers were also palmed off with a silly-sounding comedy called Buffy The Vampire Slayer, written by first-time screenwriter Joss Whedon. Starring Kristy Swanson as the eponymous heroine, but marketed as a vehicle for Beverly Hills 90210 heart-throb Luke Perry, the producers had hoped for a chunk of the Bill & Ted audience that Encino Man hadn’t swallowed up. Sadly, they had to make do with a long-running spin-off television show regularly cited as one of the greatest ever made. Gnarly.

The stalking killer thriller phenomenon that started with The Silence of The Lambs and Cape Fear echoed into 1992 with solid hits like Unlawful Entry and Single White Female. Even Patriot Games – a sort-of sequel to The Hunt For Red October with Harrison Ford rebooting Alec Baldwin’s Jack Ryan – for all its CIA espionage and partial understanding of “The Troubles” in Northern Ireland, was basically a slasher movie, with Sean Bean doing to Harrison Ford what Robert De Niro had done to Nick Nolte the year before. (Sean Bean dies, obviously).

Crimes against the Emerald Isle weren’t restricted to the gratuitous amounts of Clannad in Patriot Games. Tom Cruise’s Irish accent in Ron Howard’s Far and Away was the benchmark for all bad Irish accents until Brad Pitt graciously took the relay baton in The Devil’s Own. The film, shot in glorious 70mm was the biggest risk of the summer and proved to be the dampest squib, considering the star power of Cruise and (then-wife) Nicole Kidman. Despite looking ravishing, the script had all the depth of a bottle-cap. It desperately wanted to be a timeless classic in the David Lean tradition but held up against Unforgiven, which was released in August, Far & Away was shown up as the glorified Cbbc TV special it was.

Unforgiven came out of nowhere. Clint Eastwood’s previous movie, The Rookie, was somehow even worse than 1989’s Pink Cadillac. However, he’d been sitting on David Webb Peoples’ script for years until he was finally old enough to play William Munny. An extraordinary, mature and masterful critique of Western mythology, Unforgiven was hailed as Eastwood’s best work from the get-go, took the summer’s number five spot and would later win a handful of Oscars, including Pest Picture.

So who was the box office champion of Summer ’92? Well, that question was never in any doubt. Tim Burton’s Batman was the cultural phenomenon of 1989, redefining the parameters of box office limitations and merchandise licensing in a way not seen since Star Wars. Speculation as to who Batman would fight next and who would play him/her began immediately. Dustin Hoffman was touted to play The Penguin and Annette Bening was actually cast as Catwoman, before pregnancy forced her to drop out.

On the 19th of June, all was revealed when Batman Returns opened to a spectacular $45m weekend, $5m more than the original. Michael Keaton returned as The Caped Crusader (having split up with the creditably tight-lipped Vicki Vale), while not one but three villains put up their dukes. Danny DeVito played the Penguin as a deformed, subterranean leader of a gang of circus act drop-outs. Michelle Pfeiffer as Catwoman (perhaps her signature role) was transformed from a clumsy secretary into a vengeful whip-wielding dominatrix. Christopher Walken borrowed ‘DocEmmett Brown’s hair to play new villain, Max Shreck.

Despite the enormous opening weekend, things took a downward turn almost immediately. Audiences expecting more of the same were treated to a dark, nose-bitingly violent combination of German Expressionism, kinky S&M and oversized rubber ducks. The box office the following week dropped by 40%, and there was further controversy when McDonalds had to deal with the ire of horrified parents across America, ‘tricked’ by their Batman Returns Happy Meals into taking their kids to watch Burton’s deranged fairy tale, pussy jokes et al.

The backlash (against what is now considered a unique high-water mark in the superhero genre), meant that Batman Returns wound up making $100m less than its predecessor and it placed third for the year, behind Home Alone 2: Lost in New York, a film so determined to give its audience a familiar experience that it simply changed the first film’s screen directions from Int. Kevin’S House – Night to Ext. New York – Night and reshot the entire script. (The box office crown for the year was taken eventually by Disney’s Aladdin.)

Warner Bros. took evasive action, hiring Joel Schumacher to sweeten the mix, which would help to restore Batman’s fortunes in 1995, before everything, literally absolutely everything went wrong in 1997 and the world had to wait for Christopher Nolan to finish attending Ucl, become a director and save the Dark Knight from the resultant ignominy.

Hollywood was given a crash course in the perils of straying too far from a winning formula in the summer of ’92. Sadly, for a while at least, it learned its lesson.

The post Tamed Aliens, Harmonic Nuns and a Leather Catsuit: Strange Tales from 1992’s Summer of Cinema appeared first on HeyUGuys.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

David Bowers interview: Wimpy Kid, James Bond, family movies

Simon Brew May 25, 2017

The director of the new Wimpy Kid - and the last three - on the movie, and why he doesn't like deleted scenes...

Returning for the fourth Diary Of A Wimpy Kid film – and his third as director – is British-born director David Bowers. Having started with animation – directing Flushed Away and Astro Boy, amongst his extensive credits – Bowers has since been primarily working on bringing Jeff Kinney’s characters to the screen.

Ahead of the release in UK cinemas this Friday of Diary Of A Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul, he spared us some time for a chat about the movie.

We started by my asking if he’d been to see the film himself since it was finished…

I went on Saturday to watch it. My mother in law wanted to see it. The guy in front of us, who’d grudgingly taken his seven-year old daughter,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Catalog From The Beyond: Stir Of Echoes (1999)

A lot of well-known actors get their start in low-budget horror flicks, but Kevin Bacon happened to cut his teeth in one of the most well-known horror movies of all time, Friday the 13th. Few actors star in a classic horror movie out of the gate and then find mainstream success on their own the way Bacon did. He doesn’t often wax nostalgic about his time at Camp Crystal Lake, although that seems less because he feels above it than it does that it was thirty-seven years and almost eighty roles ago.

Friday fans (like yours truly) will always remember him as Jack, the likeable guy who ended the summer of 1980 with one hell of a sore throat, but it’s important to remember that he also has some other phenomenal genre work to his credit. One such film didn’t have me expecting much at first, but by
See full article at DailyDead »

Cannes 2017: The Killing of a Sacred Deer Review

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Jo-Ann Titmarsh

Intense choral music in the dark opens The Killing of a Sacred Deer, setting the tone for an intense ride into the crazy world of Yorgos Lanthimos. The first image we see is a close-up of a beating heart, the marble and red organ surrounded by the blue sheet of the operating theatre. This segues onto the surgeon dropping his bloodied gloves into a bin: the colours and image is similar, but one represents pulsating life and the other defeat and death.

The surgeon is Steven (Colin Farrell). He’s a renowned cardiologist married to ophthalmologist Anna (Nicole Kidman). They are a beautiful couple with two gorgeous kids – Kim (Raffey Cassidy) and Bob (Sunny Suljic). But there is another less gorgeous element: Martin (Barry Keoghan) is a teenager who surreptitiously visits Steven. They have covert meetings and Steven lavishes the boy with expensive gifts. Is he an illegitimate child?
See full article at HeyUGuys »

The Best Of The Best – The Greatest Composers And The Scores That Made Them Great

Author: Dave Roper

With Actors, Directors, Actresses and Screenwriters under our collective belt and Cinematographers still to come, we presently turn our eye towards Composers, whose music lends so much to the films they work on.

As with the other lists, credit is given for not merely one or two sterling scores, but rather a consistently excellent body of work with specific stand-out films. To be blunt, this is a trickier prospect than it at first appears. Just because a film is terrific or well-loved doesn’t necessarily mean that the score is itself a standout. We begin with perhaps the most obvious and celebrated film composer of them all…..

John WilliamsStar Wars

Goodness me. The Poseidon Adventure, The Towering Inferno, Earthquake, Jaws, Raiders of the Lost Ark, The Long Goodbye, Catch Me If You Can, Star Wars, Close Encounters, Star Wars, Superman, Et, Born on the Fourth of July,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Jonathan Demme Appreciation: A Filmmaker Who Turned His Humanity Into Art

Jonathan Demme Appreciation: A Filmmaker Who Turned His Humanity Into Art
The great filmmakers who came to prominence in the 1970s — and Jonathan Demme, who died Wednesday, was one of them — had stylistic traits that made them iconically identifiable. Robert Altman had his multi-character hubbub, Martin Scorsese had his volcanic rock ‘n’ roll virtuosity, and Francis Ford Coppola had his lavishly scaled operatic grandeur. But Demme, vivid and stirring as his filmmaking voice was, had no such obvious signature. You could almost say that he was defined by his lack of signature.

What defined a Demme film was the open-eyed flow of its humanity, the way his camera drank in everyone on screen — it didn’t matter whether the character was a goofy truck driver, a derelict billionaire, the troubled wife of a mobster, a new wave rock ‘n’ roller, or a serial killer — and took the full measure of their life and spirit. For Demme, the magic of movies resided
See full article at Variety - Film News »

What If? ‘The Graduate’ as a Horror Film

A fan trailer reimagines Mike Nichols’ classic coming-of-age story.

It’s always fun to reorient a film’s narrative based on elements of other genres. For example, I once wrote at length about why What About Bob? isn’t just a slapstick comedy but also an intense psychological thriller, and I’ve seen fan-made trailers turn films like There’s Something About Mary and Dumb and Dumber into psycho-killer flicks.

In that tradition, Alejandro Villareal has reimagined Mike Nichols’ classic coming-of-age film The Graduate into a horror film via this trailer he’s calling Hello Darkness.

From Villareal’s intro:

What ifThe Graduate” were a horror movie? The 50th anniversary of “The Graduate” is here. And in honor of this occasion, I created a fake trailer with a slight adjustment in perspective. Imagine “The Graduate” meets “Basic Instinct” meets “Cape Fear” with acne and pimples all over. Mike Nichols’s film is its generation’s grand
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »
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