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Meryl Streep Has the Best Comeback to Tom Hanks' "High Maintenance" Remark

Meryl Streep Has the Best Comeback to Tom Hanks'
Meryl Streep had quite the comeback for her co-star Tom Hanks. While attending The Post premiere in Washington D.C., Streep addressed the joke the actor recently made about her being "high maintenance." "Just check the amount of time he took in hair and makeup and how much I did, and you'll find out who's high maintenance," she jokingly said with a smile. The three-time Oscar winner also dropped a little trivia about the phrase and its relation to the film. "By the way, the movie is dedicated to Nora Ephron, who claims that phrase—high maintenance—as her own," she said. Ephron was a screenwriter for When Harry Met Sally…. At...
See full article at E! Online »

Donald Trump Is ‘Mentally Unfit’ to Be U.S. President, Rob Reiner Says

Donald Trump Is ‘Mentally Unfit’ to Be U.S. President, Rob Reiner Says
President Donald Trump is “mentally unfit” to be U.S. leader, Rob Reiner told Variety at the Dubai Intl. Film Festival, but the director fears the American press is failing to hold the Trump administration accountable for its actions. Reiner, who is best known for “A Few Good Men,” “When Harry Met Sally…” and “The Princess Bride,” was at the festival to promote his latest movie, “Shock and Awe.”

“Donald Trump is the single-most unqualified human-being to ever assume the Presidency of the United States. He is mentally unfit. Not only does he not understand how government works, he has no interest in trying to find out how it works,” Reiner said, when asked to compare Trump with President Lyndon Johnson, who was the subject of Reiner’s recently released biopic “Lbj.”

Reiner added: “Lbj – except for the Vietnam War, which is a terrible stain on his legacy – was probably the most effective and successful President as far
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Peter Bradshaw Q&A: 'Now critics get reviewed – it's a sobering experience'

This week the Guardian’s film critic presented his shortlist of 2017’s most awards-worthy movies, directors and actors. Here, he talks to arts editor Liese Spencer about the realities of reviewing, the worst thing he’s watched, and getting it wrong …

The Braddies 2017: Peter Bradshaw nominates his films of the year

Q: How did you become a film reviewer?

A: Weirdly, I’d never reviewed a film before I came to the Guardian. I read English at Cambridge in the 1980s when there was no such thing as film studies (the subject was frowned on the way English was frowned on in the era when studying classics was the only respectable thing). In the 90s I was a general Europhile columnist and journalist on the London Evening Standard writing about books, politics, TV … almost anything but cinema. Then I had a footnote in journalistic history when I became the
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Happy Birthday, Connie Sawyer! Hollywood's Oldest Working Actress Turns 105

Happy Birthday, Connie Sawyer! Hollywood's Oldest Working Actress Turns 105
Connie Sawyer, Hollywood’s oldest working actress, just turned 105!

Known for her comedic roles in When Harry Met Sally, Dumb and Dumber, Pineapple Express and Archie Bunker’s Place, the character actress has been making audiences laugh since before the television was even invented.

“There aren’t that many people around who are 105,” Sawyer tells People with a laugh. “I always say you have to move, you have to get off the couch. I used to swim, play golf, tap dance, line dance — I was always moving and I was lucky.”

She also credits good genes inherited from her parents,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

17 Movies Set in the Fall to Watch With a Warm and Spicy Latte

  • BuzzSugar
Fall is basically upon us, which means we can finally ditch our flip-flops and sunscreen for cozy scarfs and spicy lattes. And when it comes to entertainment, we have to put away our old copy of The Sandlot for another year, because there's nothing quite like watching movies set in the Fall during Fall. From classics like When Harry Met Sally to less traditional favorites likes Road Trip, there are few things we love more than burying ourselves under blankets, letting the crisp breeze fly through the open windows, and hunkering down to press play. RelatedFall Movie Preview: 45 Movies You Need to Know About
See full article at BuzzSugar »

How Harry Connick Jr. Is Supporting Wife Jill After Weight Gain During Cancer Fight: 'It's Not Silly and Not Vain’

  • PEOPLE.com
How Harry Connick Jr. Is Supporting Wife Jill After Weight Gain During Cancer Fight: 'It's Not Silly and Not Vain’
Even after 23 years of marriage, Harry Connick Jr. still gazes at Jill Goodacre like a lovestruck teen.

“She’s my best friend, and I really don’t know what I would do without her,” the actor, multiplatinum recording artist and host of the daytime talk show, Harry, tells People in this week’s issue as he and his wife reveal her five-year battle with breast cancer.

“I was scared I was going to lose her, absolutely,” says Connick Jr., 50, whose mother died of ovarian cancer when he was 13. “I wasn’t going to let her see that, but I was.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “When Harry Met Sally”

When Harry Met Sally is one of the most iconic romance movies in the history of film and set the bar for another generation of rom-coms that would come after. One of the most iconic scenes in the film is the one that tends to get remembered the most simply thanks to the public’s secret but still public love affair with all things sexual that can happen in the public eye. Yes, That scene. The film isn’t shy about the difficulties that occur during the time when two people meet and when they eventually find out that they have something

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “When Harry Met Sally
See full article at TVovermind.com »

50 Free Screenplays You Can Download Right Now, From ‘Eternal Sunshine’ to ‘Lost in Translation’

50 Free Screenplays You Can Download Right Now, From ‘Eternal Sunshine’ to ‘Lost in Translation’
Looking for a good read this fall? Skip a book and try a screenplay instead. Script Reader Pro has put together an incredible collection of 50 screenplays you can download right now for free. The database is categorized into five genres — drama, comedy, thriller, horror, and action/adventure — and includes 10 films per genre. Scripts featured include classics like “Alien” and “Reservoir Dogs” and contemporary favorites like “It Follows,” “Nightcrawler,” and “Bridesmaids.”

Read More: 2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Adapted Screenplay

For aspiring screenwriters, the collection provides a masterclass in learning the ins and outs of writing for the big screen from masters such as Charlie Kaufman, Sofia Coppola, Alexander Payne, Quentin Tarantino, and more. Oscar-winning screenplays for “Lost in Translation,” “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind,” “Good Will Hunting,” and “No Country for Old Men” are also available.

Click here to visit Script Reader Pro, where you can download all the screenplays for free.
See full article at Indiewire »

As You Wish! 10 Inconceivable Facts for The Princess Bride’s 30th Anniversary

  • Cineplex
As You Wish! 10 Inconceivable Facts for The Princess Bride’s 30th Anniversary As You Wish! 10 Inconceivable Facts for The Princess Bride’s 30th Anniversary Kurt Anthony10/9/2017 11:00:00 Am

“Hello, my name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die!”

Oh, wait. You don’t have six fingers on your right hand? Sorry, our mistake.

A classic tale of true love and high adventure, The Princess Bride invaded theatres on October 9, 1987 and has been romancing audiences ever since. After all, true love is the greatest thing in the world! Well, except for a nice Mlt.

Based on William Goldman’s 1973 fantasy-romance novel, the film was directed by the legendary Rob Reiner (This Is Spinal Tap, When Harry Met Sally…) and features a swashbuckling cast, including Robin Wright, Mandy Patinkin, Wallace Shawn, and André the Giant. After earning a modest $30.8M at the box office upon its release, the
See full article at Cineplex »

Movie taglines: an underappreciated art form

Guy Buckland Oct 4, 2017

We salute the highs, lows and plain hilarious in the world of the movie tagline...

Hanging proudly on the wall of a room in my house where I escape to watch films and play videogames (a room that you can call anything you like, but – for the love of all that is decent – must not be referred to as a ‘man cave’) is a framed poster for a movie I have never seen. A movie that I shall probably never see.

It takes pride of place nestled between The Shining, which is the wife’s joint favourite film ever (tied with Overboard), and Batman ’89. Why? Because it has arguably the single greatest tagline ever plastered over a film advertisement:

"Unwittingly, he trained a dolphin to kill the president of the United States."

It just makes me smile every time I enter the room. As Den of Geek
See full article at Den of Geek »

Author Erin Carlson on Her New Book “I’ll Have What She’s Having” and the Legacy of Nora Ephron

Nora Ephron died in 2012, at the age of 71, but she left an indelible mark on the world as one of the most influential voices of our time. She left behind a strong legacy and continues to inspire new and emerging artists. So, it is no surprise that entertainment journalist Erin Carlson has chosen to write her first book about the late Hollywood powerhouse. In “I’ll Have What She’s Having” she takes readers behind the scenes of the writer-director’s three most successful movies: “When Harry Met Sally,” “Sleepless in Seattle,” and “You’ve Got Mail.”

I spoke to Carlson about her research process and findings from authoring this book, what she learned about women in Hollywood, Ephron’s impact on the film industry, and more.

W&H: Nora directed her first movie, “This is My Life,” at 50 years old, and the rest is history. How would you describe her impact on the film industry, and rom-coms specifically?

EC: Nora’s gifts as a writer and journalist helped make her as iconic in the romantic comedy genre as her biggest stars and creative collaborators, Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan. When Nora directed her own scripts, she was masterful — only she could envision and execute the words and dialogue she wrote and the characters whom she developed. Like any singular artist, she leaves an unmistakable imprint on her work; her sweet and tart voice courses throughout her finest films, which also happened to be her romantic comedies. And she was born to make them.

As the daughter of screenwriter duo Henry and Phoebe Ephron, who raised their four girls in Beverly Hills and specialized in romances, Nora witnessed firsthand the process of writing movies, and bringing them to the big screen. She despised the word “art.” Because she understood that filmmaking was a craft, and with more experience, something at which she could improve. The truth is male directors get more chances than their women counterparts to fail and then score another plum project.

Since her critically acclaimed debut film, “This Is My Life,” did poorly at the box office, TriStar, the studio behind “Sleepless in Seattle,” was initially skeptical about handing this novice the reins of a big-budget romantic comedy — of course, she proved everyone wrong, and that romantic comedy became one of the top-grossing offerings of 1993.

Nora knew that two things contributed to a successful romcom: writing and casting. And hers were wry, knowing, and urbane, yet drenched in the unabashed optimism of the Golden Age classics of her youth. She created strong woman characters who could stand up to the men in their lives, and show them a thing or two. For example, Sally turning the tables on Harry, and acting out a fake orgasm in a deli in “When Harry Met Sally.”

Nora truly believed in the possibility of love between equals, and it was important to her to infuse Sally Albright, Annie Reed, and Kathleen Kelly with a voice — and jokes — as strong as the male lead’s. Why should the guys have all the fun? Nora created worlds in which anything, and everything was possible — worlds that we all still want to live in, and we return to again and again.

W&H: How did you come to land on the three films that you chose to highlight from her career?

EC: “When Harry Met Sally,” “Sleepless in Seattle,” and “You’ve Got Mail” are a trilogy of romantic comedies that represent Nora’s best and most enduring work, and through which her muse, Meg Ryan, played an instrumental part. These movies are her legacy, with “Julie & Julia” runner-up — because Meryl, Stanley Tucci … butter!

Sleepless in Seattle

W&H:You did a great deal of interviews for this book. Which women in her life did you know that you had to talk to and were there any women who did not want to speak to you?

EC: I knew that I absolutely had to speak with Delia Ephron, Nora’s sister and collaborator who worked with her on “Sleepless” and “You’ve Got Mail.” Delia told me she was the “guardian” of the sisters’ scripts, namely that Nora trusted her to protect the integrity of their screenplays during the filmmaking process. Delia had crucial insight into Nora’s vision and working style. I was lucky to interview her.

Meg Ryan, meanwhile, proved a challenge — just when I thought her publicist would connect me for an interview, she went radio silent even though Tom Hanks, her beloved colleague, had spoken with me. At the time, “Star” magazine had done a series of unflattering covers of Meg, and it appeared that she felt burned by the media and potentially even talking to journalists. Who can blame her? However, rather than Meg give me PR-approved soundbites about her own legacy in romantic comedy, it was more fascinating to put together a portrait of her based on my wide-ranging interviews with the folks who could speak openly and honestly about her transformation from ingenue to leading lady in the span of “When Harry Met Sally” to “Sleepless.”

W&H: I loved reading about Nora’s relationships with different men in Hollywood during the course of her career. Can you talk about these relationships, and particularly any sexism in the film industry that she faced during the course of her career?

EC: Nora was married three times. Her first husband was the comedy writer Dan Greenburg, whom she divorced amid the feminist movement that shook things up in the 1970s; her second was Carl Bernstein, who, together with Bob Woodward, linked Watergate to President Nixon. Bernstein left her for another woman while she was pregnant with their second child.

That experience traumatized and humiliated her — but she had the last laugh when she wrote the juicy novel “Heartburn,” a thinly veiled account of the demise of her marriage to Bernstein. That book, of course, became the movie with Meryl Streep and Jack Nicholson; Bernstein did not want this movie to get made, though he reportedly loved that Jack, the hottest movie star of his day, was playing a fictional version of Carl.

Several years later, Nora married Nick Pileggi, her third — and best — husband. Pileggi is a “famously nice guy,” as Nora has written, and renowned for his reporting on the Mafia. He wrote the book which inspired Martin Scorsese’s “Goodfellas.” More importantly, he adored Nora and relished in her success, rather than harbor resentment toward it.

But you’re asking me about Nora’s relationships with men in Hollywood! Well, she and “When Harry Met Sally” director Rob Reiner were pretty tight. He trusted her and believed in her talent and gave her the credit of associate producer on his movie; even though he had a hand in co-writing the script for Harry and Sally, Nora received the sole credit as the screenwriter, as well as the only Oscar nomination for anyone involved with the film. That says a lot about Rob. He’s a mensch, with a strong mother.

Rob appreciated Nora and her contributions and what she brought to the character of Sally as well as her keen social observations and killer one-liners. They understood each other as comic writers and as the children of parents who were successful in showbiz. With Nora, Rob saw an equal. It is utterly mystifying to me that he still believes that men and women’t can’t be friends — how, then, could Nora continue to work in Hollywood and be friends with men like Rob, or Mike Nichols, or Tom Hanks? That is the great irony.

When Harry Met Sally

W&H: What did you learn about women’s roles in Hollywood while writing this book?

EC: It’s still a man’s world, with shitty roles for women and a dearth of directing opportunities. Like Nora, if women want to create movies and TV series centered on female characters, then they will need to write and direct material they originate and cultivate themselves.

W&H: Which modern women in Hollywood have been greatly influenced by Nora?

EC: Funny you ask: Since Lena Dunham was mentored by Nora, and is a hugely talented writer-director in her own right, people want to categorize Lena as the new Nora. She’s not. Lena is open and unfiltered where Nora was self-possessed, always aware of the boundaries between people.

If I had to choose a Nora heir, it would have to be Tina Fey. Tina led “Saturday Night Live” for years before “30 Rock,” and the two women share a similar arch, self-deprecating sense of humor and B.S. detector that have won them zillions of female fans. Plus, they set their movies and TV shows in New York, capturing the endless idiosyncrasies of the Greatest City in the World.

Another thing: I know it sounds weird, but Taylor Swift also reminds me of Nora. She just keeps bouncing back from shit, and reinventing herself, and writing about her love life and exes within a narrative in which Taylor always wins as the heroine, never the victim, of her own story. Her own romantic comedy. Harry Styles be damned!

“You’ve Got Mail”

W&H: How far have women come since then and how do you think Nora would feel about where women in Hollywood are today?

EC: Following a summer in which Patty Jenkins’ “Wonder Woman” kicked ass, and Nicole Kidman and Elisabeth Moss cleaned up at the Emmys, it’s easy to feel better about the state of women in Hollywood today. However, we have a long way to go toward creating roles for actresses that are as compelling as those men get to play — and not just love interests, mothers, wives, and daughters.

Nora, a barrier-breaking feminist, loathed panels on women in film. She hated labels and felt trapped by them and wanted to be known as a “director,” not a “woman director.” That said, she would doubtless be heartened by a newly energized feminist movement of women and girls who are taking less shit and taking more names. “Go out and get what you want,” she might tell them. “Just do it.”

“I’ll Have What She’s Having” is available now and can be purchased on Amazon.

https://medium.com/media/b944fd4727ea47477e9028d3530d9c97/href

Author Erin Carlson on Her New Book “I’ll Have What She’s Having” and the Legacy of Nora Ephron was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

‘I’ll Have What She’s Having’ is a Wonderful Love Letter to Nora Ephron, But a Short Postscript to Rom-Coms

‘I’ll Have What She’s Having’ is a Wonderful Love Letter to Nora Ephron, But a Short Postscript to Rom-Coms
When I first saw When Harry Met Sally the summer after middle school, I thought it was revolutionary. No romantic comedy I’d seen before was so frank, so funny, so real. Admittedly, my rom-com education had been lacking up until then, primarily filled by early Kate Hudson and Jennifer Lopez schmaltz. It’s no exaggeration to […]

The post ‘I’ll Have What She’s Having’ is a Wonderful Love Letter to Nora Ephron, But a Short Postscript to Rom-Coms appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Ten Best: Phone Scenes in Movies

To celebrate today’s release of the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus – available in stores from today – here’s a list of the Ten Best phone scenes in movies, showcasing some of the most famous telephone calls ever made.

Pillow Talk (1959)

A man and woman share a telephone line and despise each other, but when he sees the woman for the first time and immediately falls for her, he has fun by romancing her with his voice disguised. Pillow Talk was the first of three movies in which Doris Day and Rock Hudson starred together and was named by the National Film Registry for being ‘culturally, historically and aesthetically’ significant.

When Harry Met Sally (1989)

The 1989 American romantic comedy starring Billy Crystal (Harry) and Meg Ryan (Sally) raised the question: ‘Can men and women ever just be friends’? Grossing a total of $92.2 million at the box office, the film’s plot focuses
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

10 Best Stephen King Movies So Far

  • MovieWeb
10 Best Stephen King Movies So Far
It stormed the box office in September 2017, smashing box office records, pleasing critics, and quickly washing away the bad taste of so many poorly wrought Stephen King adaptations like the current of a suburban neighborhood sewer. Move over Ernest Hemmingway! Beat it Dr. Seuss! The Stephen King adaptation is a hot commodity in Hollywood once again.

Sure, those aforementioned authors have had their books adapted less than half as many times as the works of Stephen King. With so many adapted works from the same prolific storyteller, many of them are sure to be bad. And that is the case with Stephen King. If you grew up in the 80s, you might even remember that a Stephen King movie was not anticipated with the kind of must-see attitude of today's audiences. Many laughed off the notion, believing that if it was a Stephen King movie, it must be bad.

But as It reminded audiences,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Harry Connick Jr. Fell in Love With Music at a Very Young Age

Harry Connick Jr. Fell in Love With Music at a Very Young Age
Harry Connick Jr. begins the second season for his syndicated talk show “Harry” in September. The jazzman released his first album when he was 10 years old, and broke into the mainstream after recording the soundtrack to “When Harry Met Sally…” at 22. The album hit No. 1 on Billboard’s jazz chart, won Connick his first Grammy (for jazz male vocal performance), and was certified double platinum. The New Orleans native has also acted in numerous roles; wrote the Broadway musical “Thou Shalt Not,” was Tony-nominated as an actor for “The Pajama Game,” and mentored on “American Idol.” Variety first mentioned him on April 8, 1981, as part of the announced lineup for the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, where at 14, he joined such legends as Cab Calloway and James Brown.

Do you remember the 1981 jazz festival performance?

The only thing I remember from that performance was there was a guy named James Booker, who
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Larry Sherman, New York Actor and Onetime Donald Trump Publicist, Dies at 94

Character actor Larry Sherman, who also served as publicist for Donald Trump in the 1980s, died Aug. 26 in New York of natural causes. He was 94.

Sherman received degrees in theater and journalism from the University of North Caroline at Chapel Hill, kicking around Manhattan with some stage roles and bit parts before segueing into a successful career as a sports journalist. He covered the 1962 Rome Olympics, and wrote for The Herald Tribune and Newsday before landing at the Long Island Press, where he worked for 25 years.

When the newspaper folded in 1977, Sherman moved to Los Angeles to take a job as head writer for the game show “The Joker’s Wild.” When that program went dark, he moved back to New York looking for work. “He began calling on his friends, and it was a guy at the New York Times, I think, who said ‘I hear this guy Trump is looking for a guy to do
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Larry Sherman, New York Actor and Onetime Donald Trump Publicist, Dies at 94

Character actor Larry Sherman, who also served as publicist for Donald Trump in the 1980s, died Aug. 26 in New York of natural causes. He was 94.

Sherman received degrees in theater and journalism from the University of North Caroline at Chapel Hill, kicking around Manhattan with some stage roles and bit parts before segueing into a successful career as a sports journalist. He covered the 1962 Rome Olympics, and wrote for The Herald Tribune and Newsday before landing at the Long Island Press, where he worked for 25 years.

When the newspaper folded in 1977, Sherman moved to Los Angeles to take a job as head writer for the game show “The Joker’s Wild.” When that program went dark, he moved back to New York looking for work. “He began calling on his friends, and it was a guy at the New York Times, I think, who said ‘I hear this guy Trump is looking for a guy to do
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Joker Spinoffs — Everything You Need to Know About the Many Dceu Projects in Development

The Joker Spinoffs — Everything You Need to Know About the Many Dceu Projects in Development
With Hollywood’s love affair with franchises seems to grow exponentially every day, the recent flurry of headlines about a Joker origin story, “Suicide Squad” sequels and spinoffs, and major “Batman” casting news is enough to make your head spin. Of course, the mere mention of Martin Scorsese as a producer clearly puts one of these projects on a different level, but there is plenty of excitement to go around with a character this iconic.

Read More:The Joker Origin Story Movie: Martin Scorsese Producing, Todd Phillips to Direct

While details are fuzzy as everything is in early stages, Warner Bros. is laying the foundation for multiple standalone projects that do not exist within the DC Extended Universe, as reported by Deadline. At the same time, the studio is moving forward with “Suicide Squad” sequel. The idea is to capitalize on the popularity of the characters while luring bigger name directors
See full article at Indiewire »

The Guys Behind This Is Us Are Writing the Joker and Harley Quinn Stand-Alone Movie

Hot on the heels of Warner Bros.'s announcement that a stand-alone film centered around the origin story of the Joker is currently in the works (much to DC fans' chagrin), the studio revealed the classic green-haired supervillain will also appear in another spin-off, of sorts. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Glenn Ficarra and John Requa - executive producers and directors of NBC's extremely weepy drama This Is Us and also the directors behind the 2011 romantic comedy Crazy, Stupid, Love - are "in final negotiations to pen and helm an untitled movie project centering on Batman villains Joker and Harley Quinn." Well, start stocking up on tissues now, I guess? The film, which is on track to hit theaters sometime after the Suicide Squad sequel, will see Margot Robbie and Jared Leto reprising their roles as Gotham City's resident psycho and his puddin'. Given Ficarra and Requa's background, it shouldn't
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Joker & Harley Quinn Movie In The Works From Crazy, Stupid, Love Directors

It’s been a hell of a 48 hours for DC fans. First we got the news that Warner Bros. was working on a gritty Joker origin film outside the Dceu, and that they were working on a banner that would allow them to tell “elseworld” stories with DC characters that aren’t restricted by the current universe. Then The Batman director Matt Reeves said (via a month-old interview) that his Batman film would not be in the extended universe. Now, we can debate what he means by this (some think he means the film will just be standalone in nature), but the reality is that he says it’s not part of the extended universe.

All of a sudden, over the course of a short period of time, we go from one cohesive universe with many films to one big universe with many films, and two films that fall outside of it.
See full article at LRM Online »
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