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Breaking Down the New Trailer For Netflix’s Wormwood Series

Wormwood is an American docudrama that will be coming out on Netflix on December 15. Its documentarian Errol Morris should be familiar to a fair number of people, seeing as how he was the one who made both The Fog of War and The Thin Blue Line, both of which are well-regarded by both critics and consumers. As for Wormwood‘s subject matter, well, suffice to say that interested individuals can learn a lot by watching the trailer that has just been released, which makes it clear that the docudrama will be telling the tale of Dr. Frank Olson through interviews

Breaking Down the New Trailer For Netflix’s Wormwood Series
See full article at TVovermind.com »

'Quest' Review: Moving Doc on Philly Family Makes the Personal Political

'Quest' Review: Moving Doc on Philly Family Makes the Personal Political
His name is Christopher Rainey, but you can call him "Quest" – that's the nickname this North Philly resident is known by. Christine'a Rainey, his wife and a women's shelter employee, is sometimes called "Ma Quest," usually by the folks who drop by her spouse's recording studio for his "Freestyle Friday" open-houses. ("I always feel like someone's mother," she says, with both pride and weariness.) They each have kids from previous marriages – her son William has just become a father and discovered he had a cancerous brain tumor in quick succession – and one child together: P.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Watch Errol Morris' Wormwood Trailer

Like so many auteurs working on projects that are considered 'niche' -- basically anything not in Tights or in a franchise, these days -- Errol Morris has gone over to the streaming services (in this case, Netflix) with his current project. Wormwood is a documentary heavy with actor recreations; coincidentally, this is the medium that Morris practically invented with 1988's The Thin Blue Line, which saw the subsequent death-row convict released from prison. The six-part series looks at the U.S.A. government and CIA behavior in the Mk-ultra programs and the effect it has had on one man, Eric Olson, whose father, Frank, a CIA contractor, died under mysterious circumstances. The CIA dosed Frank with LSD in 1953, a mere nine days prior to his 'suicide.'...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

‘Wormwood’ Trailer: Errol Morris Explores The CIA, LSD & Mind Control

There are documentarians and then there are storytellers, and Errol Morris firmly fits in the latter category. While the director is best known for efforts like “Gates Of Heaven,” “The Fog Of War,” and “A Brief History Of Time,” his latest effort “Wormwood” probably falls more in line with his docu-drama classic, “The Thin Blue Line.” And Netflix has given the legendary filmmaker six episodes to unfold this fascinating story.

Continue reading ‘Wormwood’ Trailer: Errol Morris Explores The CIA, LSD & Mind Control at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

CIA Experiments, Conspiracies and a Mysterious Death: Inside Netflix’s New True Crime Series

CIA Experiments, Conspiracies and a Mysterious Death: Inside Netflix’s New True Crime Series
Netflix’s upcoming docuseries Wormwood mixes fiction and nonfiction to investigate a thicket of decades-long conspiracy theories around the CIA — and how one family may have paid the price for the agency’s secrets.

But to Errol Morris, its Oscar-winning director, Wormwood‘s key mystery is fairly simple.

“It’s a room,” he tells People of the six-part series, exclusively previewed above. “When you boil it all down, there’s a room in this hotel on Seventh Avenue in New York overlooking the old Penn Station. Just after Thanksgiving 1953, Frank Olson, an Army scientist, goes out a window 13 floors onto the pavement below.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Film Review: ‘A Murder in Mansfield’

Film Review: ‘A Murder in Mansfield’
The words “true crime” have never lost their dime-store tabloid allure. Yet most of us realize that when a story of extreme and shocking violence taps our voyeuristic curiosity, that doesn’t necessarily make it “low.” Ambitious documentary filmmakers have long understood that true-crime material, when treated as the dimension of the human experience it is, can emerge as something spookily resonant and artful.

Errol Morris’s “The Thin Blue Line” looked at murder in the heartland with a spirit that evoked Norman Mailer’s “The Executioner’s Song.” Werner Herzog’s “Into the Abyss” entered the minds of two vicious killers (it didn’t get as deep into the abyss as it implied, but it was a game attempt). “O.J.: Made in America” turned the Simpson saga into a charged excavation of the roots of violence. Now Barbara Kopple, the veteran director of documentaries about embattled workers (“Harlan County U.S.A.,” “American Dream”), pop-music
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Is Errol Morris’s ‘Wormwood’ a Documentary? Netflix Says Yes, Oscars Say No

Errol Morris has been ahead of the curve ever since he broke out with pet cemetery documentary “Gates of Heaven” in 1978. A decade later, “The Thin Blue Line” wowed critics but alienated the hidebound documentary community with its use of “reenactments” and a rousing Philip Glass score. Decades before Netflix created “Making a Murderer,” “The Keepers,” and “Witness,” Morris’ film actually solved a murder mystery and freed an innocent Death Row convict in a Texas prison.

Since then, Glass became a go-to movie composer, earning three Oscar nominations — and could score a fourth for this year’s Oscar documentary frontrunner “Jane.” Reenactments have become standard issue for nonfiction films, filling the void between talking heads, archival footage, cinéma vérité observation, and what isn’t visually available. And Morris isn’t the only filmmaker who is a presence in his films, yelling at his subjects from behind his invention, the Interrotron.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Is Errol Morris’s ‘Wormwood’ a Documentary? Netflix Says Yes, Oscars Say No

  • Indiewire
Errol Morris has been ahead of the curve ever since he broke out with pet cemetery documentary “Gates of Heaven” in 1978. A decade later, “The Thin Blue Line” wowed critics but alienated the hidebound documentary community with its use of “reenactments” and a rousing Philip Glass score. Decades before Netflix created “Making a Murderer,” “The Keepers,” and “Witness,” Morris’ film actually solved a murder mystery and freed an innocent Death Row convict in a Texas prison.

Since then, Glass became a go-to movie composer, earning three Oscar nominations — and could score a fourth for this year’s Oscar documentary frontrunner “Jane.” Reenactments have become standard issue for nonfiction films, filling the void between talking heads, archival footage, cinéma vérité observation, and what isn’t visually available. And Morris isn’t the only filmmaker who is a presence in his films, yelling at his subjects from behind his invention, the Interrotron.
See full article at Indiewire »

Errol Morris on the "Disturbing" Rise of Fake News

Errol Morris on the
The Thin Blue Line and the Oscar-winning 2003 film The Fog of War, once again dives deep for his latest project, but in this case, he takes his time, telling the story over four and a half hours. In the six-episode series Wormwood (debuting Dec. 15 on Netflix and in theaters), the filmmaker, who will be honored with a tribute during AFI Fest, focuses on the true story of Eric Olsen, who spent 60 years investigating the mysterious 1953 suicide of his father, a scientist who was working with the CIA....
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

In Oscar Documentary Race, First Time Can Be the Charm

In Oscar Documentary Race, First Time Can Be the Charm
It’s never easy being green, but if you’re a documentary filmmaker it can have its advantages. Especially come Oscar season.

In the past two decades, 12 directors have taken home the Academy Award for their very first documentary theatrical feature. They include Ezra Edelman (“O.J.: Made in America”), Louie Psihoyos (“The Cove”) and Malik Bendjelloul (“Searching for Sugarman”). Those films beat out docus made by veteran nonfiction helmers like Kirby Dick (“The Invisible War”), Wim Wenders (“Pina”) and Oscar winner Roger Ross Williams (“Life Animated”).

When it comes to receiving a nomination in the documentary feature category, the odds are even better. In the last decade more than 20 first time feature docu helmers have nabbed an Oscar nod. They include Ellen Kuras (“The Betrayal — Nerakhoon”), Sebastian Junger and the late Tim Hetherington (“Restrepo”), Charles Ferguson (“No End in Sight”) and John Maloof and Charlie Siskel (“Finding Vivian Maier”).

Comparatively, in the last 10 years,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Doc NYC 2017: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See At the Festival, From ‘EuroTrump’ to ‘David Bowie: The Last Five Years’

  • Indiewire
Doc NYC 2017: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See At the Festival, From ‘EuroTrump’ to ‘David Bowie: The Last Five Years’
New York City’s annual Doc NYC festival kicks off this week, including a full-to-bursting slate of some of this year’s most remarkable documentaries. If you’ve been looking to beef up on your documentary consumption, Doc NYC is the perfect chance to check out a wide variety of some of the year’s best fact-based features. Ahead, we pick out 14 of our most anticipated films from the fest, including some awards contenders, a handful of buzzy debuts, and a number of festival favorites. Take a look and start filling up your schedule now.

Doc NYC runs November 9 – 16 in New York City.

EuroTrump

Donald Trump may seem like a sui generis figure, a one-of-a-kind monster who was forged in a perfect storm of racism, tweets, and chaos, but history suggests that he’s really just a new breed of an old type. You don’t even have to look
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscars: Netflix and Errol Morris Defy Convention With Hybrid Doc ‘Wormwood’

Oscars: Netflix and Errol Morris Defy Convention With Hybrid Doc ‘Wormwood’
Oscar-winning documentary filmmaker Errol Morris has “run afoul” of the film Academy before, he jokes. After all, his unconventional 1988 cinematic investigation “The Thin Blue Line” apparently violated unspoken dogma within the documentary community that year, yielding one of the most egregious snubs in Oscar history.

Nevertheless, he’s ready to test the organization’s boundaries once again this year, and he’s found an apt partner in a trailblazing platform that’s no stranger to upsetting industry status quo.

Netflix will release Morris’ “Wormwood” as a four-hour, six-part event on the streaming site on Dec. 15. But following the series’ world premiere at the Telluride Film Festival in September, the director has prepared a non-episodic theatrical version with a single intermission, Variety has learned. Netflix plans to submit that version to the film Academy, and not only for documentary feature consideration, but for all other categories as well.

That in and of itself is not uncommon. But what makes
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Harvey Weinstein: His Career Timeline of Sexual Harassment Allegations

Harvey Weinstein: His Career Timeline of Sexual Harassment Allegations
In this week’s missile of a The New York Times story about the many alleged indiscretions of Harvey Weinstein, one of his past colleagues, former Miramax Los Angeles president Mark Gill, describes Weinstein’s professional climb from indie producer to Hollywood titan. “From the outside, it seemed golden — the Oscars, the success, the remarkable cultural impact.” Yet Gill said the persistent whispers that Weinstein was mistreating women were in fact “the biggest mess of all.”

While The Weinstein Co. co-founder publicly championed women’s rights, his accusers say that he was a hypocrite, secretly propositioning them for massages, kisses and more. One month after Weinstein distributed “The Hunting Ground,” a documentary about rapes on university campuses, he allegedly groped a college-aged woman in his office. Weinstein, 65, has a well-documented, on-the-record history of unflattering behavior, even against women (like in 2002, when he publicly berated director Julie Taymor at a screening of her film,
See full article at Indiewire »

Doc NYC Announces Its Awards Short List, Including ‘Icarus,’ ‘Jane,’ and ‘Strong Island’

Doc NYC Announces Its Awards Short List, Including ‘Icarus,’ ‘Jane,’ and ‘Strong Island’
Doc NYC, America’s largest documentary festival, has announced its 15-film Short List of Oscar contenders along with its opening-night selection, “The Final Year,” in which Greg Barker follows key members of Barack Obama’s administration during their last year in office. The festival runs November 9-16.

Thom Powers, Doc NYC’s artistic director as well as documentary programmer for Tiff, oversees curation of the Short List of films that may be in the running for the Academy Award for Best Documentary feature. This year contains a spectrum of funders and distributors, including four from Netflix — and none from HBO.

Historically, most Doc NYC picks do land on the Academy’s official 15-film Oscar Short List. For the past four years, the Short List had nine to 10 titles overlap, with four or five titles going on to Oscar nominations. For the last six years, Doc NYC screened the documentary that
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Doc NYC Announces Its Awards Short List, Including ‘Icarus,’ ‘Jane,’ and ‘Strong Island’

  • Indiewire
Doc NYC Announces Its Awards Short List, Including ‘Icarus,’ ‘Jane,’ and ‘Strong Island’
Doc NYC, America’s largest documentary festival, has announced its 15-film Short List of Oscar contenders along with its opening-night selection, “The Final Year,” in which Greg Barker follows key members of Barack Obama’s administration during their last year in office. The festival runs November 9-16.

Thom Powers, Doc NYC’s artistic director as well as documentary programmer for Tiff, oversees curation of the Short List of films that may be in the running for the Academy Award for Best Documentary feature. This year contains a spectrum of funders and distributors, including four from Netflix — and none from HBO.

Historically, most Doc NYC picks do land on the Academy’s official 15-film Oscar Short List. For the past four years, the Short List had nine to 10 titles overlap, with four or five titles going on to Oscar nominations. For the last six years, Doc NYC screened the documentary that
See full article at Indiewire »

‘American Vandal’: How Two Guys Combined ‘Making a Murderer’ and ‘Freaks and Geeks’ and Got One of 2017’s Best Comedies

‘American Vandal’: How Two Guys Combined ‘Making a Murderer’ and ‘Freaks and Geeks’ and Got One of 2017’s Best Comedies
American Vandal” is one of the most delightful TV experiments of 2017, but it easily could have been something far simpler. In the parody world, it’s hard to be able to sustain a tribute to (or retooling of) a pre-existing genre or specific piece of work. Most of these riffs pick out the recognizable highlights, build a few-minute sketch around a simple tweak of the formula, and a grateful internet marvels at the accuracy or the strength of the twist.

Netflix’s latest eight-episode series nearly became just that.

“We did ‘30 for 30: Space Jam,’ ‘30 for 30: Rocky IV,’ stuff like that,” explained “American Vandal” co-creator Tony Yacenda told IndieWire. “Dan was watching ‘Making a Murderer’ and he knew I was a huge fan of true crime stuff, and he just had the broad idea for a short, to do a really low-stakes crime and treat it like it’s really serious.
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘American Vandal’: How Two Guys Combined ‘Making a Murderer’ and ‘Freaks and Geeks’ and Got One of 2017’s Best Comedies

  • Indiewire
‘American Vandal’: How Two Guys Combined ‘Making a Murderer’ and ‘Freaks and Geeks’ and Got One of 2017’s Best Comedies
American Vandal” is one of the most delightful TV experiments of 2017, but it easily could have been something far simpler. In the parody world, it’s hard to be able to sustain a tribute to (or retooling of) a pre-existing genre or specific piece of work. Most of these riffs pick out the recognizable highlights, build a few-minute sketch around a simple tweak of the formula, and a grateful internet marvels at the accuracy or the strength of the twist.

Netflix’s latest eight-episode series nearly became just that.

“We did ‘30 for 30: Space Jam,’ ‘30 for 30: Rocky IV,’ stuff like that,” explained “American Vandal” co-creator Tony Yacenda told IndieWire. “Dan was watching ‘Making a Murderer’ and he knew I was a huge fan of true crime stuff, and he just had the broad idea for a short, to do a really low-stakes crime and treat it like it’s really serious.
See full article at Indiewire »

New Academy President John Bailey is Willing to Ask if Movies Need Theaters For Oscar Qualification, and Other Radical Ideas

New Academy President John Bailey is Willing to Ask if Movies Need Theaters For Oscar Qualification, and Other Radical Ideas
As words like film, negative, celluloid, unspool, and reel become increasingly archaic, even the venerable Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences realizes that it needs to evolve. At the Telluride Film Festival, I sat down with new Academy president John Bailey to discuss what he has in mind. Here’s what we can expect from the 75-year-old cinematographer of “The Big Chill” and “Groundhog Day,” who is proud to be the rare filmmaker representing the Academy board.

(Re)Define the motion picture

Bailey is a realist as much as a cineaste. At Telluride, he appreciated Paul Schrader’s well-reviewed “First Reformed” — but fully supported the possibility that the film would go to Netflix. “It’s very unlikely the studios would pick it up,” said Bailey. “In reality, Netflix and Amazon have now become the studios that have the courage to make the film nobody else would make.”

Similarly, while
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

New Academy President John Bailey is Willing to Ask if Movies Need Theaters For Oscar Qualification, and Other Radical Ideas

  • Indiewire
New Academy President John Bailey is Willing to Ask if Movies Need Theaters For Oscar Qualification, and Other Radical Ideas
As words like film, negative, celluloid, unspool, and reel become increasingly archaic, even the venerable Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences realizes that it needs to evolve. At the Telluride Film Festival, I sat down with new Academy president John Bailey to discuss what he has in mind. Here’s what we can expect from the 75-year-old cinematographer of “The Big Chill” and “Groundhog Day,” who is proud to be the rare filmmaker representing the Academy board.

(Re)Define the motion picture

Bailey is a realist as much as a cineaste. At Telluride, he appreciated Paul Schrader’s well-reviewed “First Reformed” — but fully supported the possibility that the film would go to Netflix. “It’s very unlikely the studios would pick it up,” said Bailey. “In reality, Netflix and Amazon have now become the studios that have the courage to make the film nobody else would make.”

Similarly, while
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: Peter Sarsgaard Stars In Netflix’s ‘Wormwood,’ a Documentary-Fiction Combo You’ve Never Experienced Before

Review: Peter Sarsgaard Stars In Netflix’s ‘Wormwood,’ a Documentary-Fiction Combo You’ve Never Experienced Before
Errol Morris has built a career around eccentric real-life figures, from pet cemetery managers to executioners, but in recent years his track record has been spotty. His portrait of photographer Elsa Dorfman (“The B-Side”) and a two-hour interrogation session with Donald Rumsfeld (“The Unknown Known”) weren’t duds so much as routine efforts from a filmmaker who excels at peculiar investigations into the whims of human behavior. As if making up for missed time, Morris pairs one of his best subjects in years with his most ambitious work to date, “Wormwood,” a six-part Netflix miniseries that screened in its entirety at the Telluride Film Festival in advance of its December premiere on the platform.

While much of Morris’ sensibilities comes through in this sprawling tale of government cover-ups and idiosyncratic loners, it’s also a radical break from the dense, interview-driven approach that has distinguished his movies for decades. Gone is the patented Interrotron,
See full article at Indiewire »
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