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Interview, Audio: Director Todd Haynes Becomes ‘Wonderstruck’

  • HollywoodChicago.com
Chicago – Todd Haynes is an American auteur, as every one of his films bear the distinct mark of his creativity. From his beginnings with the indie masterpiece “Safe” (1995) through unforgettable films like “Far From Heaven” (2002), “I’m Not There” (2007) and “Carol,” Haynes has made cinematic art. His latest film is “Wonderstruck.”

The film is adapted from a popular young adult novel by Brian Selznick, which was combined with distinct graphic art. Haynes use the art to dreamily interpret the book, as the film is set in the 1920s and 1970s New York City. Jumping from era to era is the catch of the story, as a deaf girl (Millicent Simmonds) from the ‘20s is interconnected to a newly deaf boy (Oakes Fegley) in the 1970s. The film features Julianne Moore in a dual role, and also features Michelle Williams.

Todd Haynes at the Chicago International Film Festival in 2015

Photo credit:
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

‘Wonderstruck’: Todd Haynes Blows Up Cinema, One Genre at a Time

‘Wonderstruck’: Todd Haynes Blows Up Cinema, One Genre at a Time
Maybe Todd Haynes has always been too smart for his own good. The 56-year-old director has been making films for nearly 40 years, but in some ways he’s still the Brown semiotics grad who can’t resist the siren’s call of form. As he admits, “I like to set up obstacles at times, because movies are ultimately about what the spectator brings to them.”

That would seem to make him an unlikely candidate to direct a young-adult adaptation, but his “Carol” and “Velvet Goldmine” costume designer Sandy Powell knew better. When she discovered Brian Selznick’s 2011 graphic novel “Wonderstruck,” which intertwines stories from 1927 and 1977 in a young-adult mystery with little dialogue, she encouraged him to adapt it for Haynes on spec.

Indeed, Haynes found the “Wonderstruck” screenplay downright Haynesian. “Brian’s script was so ornately and attentively cinematic,” he said. “Not just the movie references, but the use of
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Wonderstruck’: Todd Haynes Blows Up Cinema, One Genre at a Time

  • Indiewire
‘Wonderstruck’: Todd Haynes Blows Up Cinema, One Genre at a Time
Maybe Todd Haynes has always been too smart for his own good. The 56-year-old director has been making films for nearly 40 years, but in some ways he’s still the Brown semiotics grad who can’t resist the siren’s call of form. As he admits, “I like to set up obstacles at times, because movies are ultimately about what the spectator brings to them.”

That would seem to make him an unlikely candidate to direct a young-adult adaptation, but his “Carol” and “Velvet Goldmine” costume designer Sandy Powell knew better. When she discovered Brian Selznick’s 2011 graphic novel “Wonderstruck,” which intertwines stories from 1927 and 1977 in a young-adult mystery with little dialogue, she encouraged him to adapt it for Haynes on spec.

Indeed, Haynes found the “Wonderstruck” screenplay downright Haynesian. “Brian’s script was so ornately and attentively cinematic,” he said. “Not just the movie references, but the use of
See full article at Indiewire »

Five Things You Didn’t Know About Director Todd Haynes

Todd Haynes was born in Los Angeles on January 2, 1961. He is an American independent director, producer, and screenwriter who is considered one of the pioneers of the New Queer Cinema filmmaking movement. When he filmed the short film ‘Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story’ in 1987, it brought him to the attention of the public. This short film covered her life story but was unusual in the sense that it used Barbie dolls rather than real actors. His fame grew in 1991 when he made his feature directorial debut with a three-part film called ‘Poison’ about the AIDS-era. Since

Five Things You Didn’t Know About Director Todd Haynes
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Todd Haynes to Direct Documentary on The Velvet Underground

Coming off the heels of the Cannes premiere of his new film Wonderstruck, which will be shown as the Centerpiece selection of this year’s New York Film Festival, Todd Haynes has announced that his next project will be a documentary on the legendary rock band The Velvet Underground. As reported on by Variety, Haynes, for which this will be his first documentary, is seeking to create a visual experience that will “rely certainly on [Andy] Warhol films but also a rich culture of experimental film, a vernacular we have lost and we don’t have, [and that] we increasingly get further removed from,” in addition to interviews with the surviving members of the band and other contemporaries.

In addition, the article mentions an Amazon limited TV series that the director is developing which is said to be about a currently unidentified, immensely influential and radical public figure.

Haynes, who is in Locarno
See full article at The Film Stage »

Todd Haynes To Direct Documentary On The Velvet Underground, Prepping Amazon Series

  • The Playlist
Todd Haynes has had a long running interest in the world of music and the personalities that populate it. The director’s early short film “Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story” made him one to watch, he explored the ’70s glam scene with “Velvet Goldmine,” and tried to capture the enigmatic Bob Dylan with “I’m Not There.” All of these projects were cinematic visions of their subject, but now Haynes is taking a more straight-ahead approach to one of rock ‘n roll’s most influential acts.

Continue reading Todd Haynes To Direct Documentary On The Velvet Underground, Prepping Amazon Series at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Cannes Film Review: Todd Haynes’ ‘Wonderstruck’

Cannes Film Review: Todd Haynes’ ‘Wonderstruck’
Todd Haynes is a transcendent filmmaker, one who can haunt your imagination and carry you away, but in “Wonderstruck,” there’s more artistry in his storytelling than there is in the intricate mechanical story he’s telling. We’re watching a visionary humanist apply his luminous voice to a piece of emotional Tinkertoy. The film is based on an illustrated children’s novel by Brian Selznick, who wrote and drew “The Invention of Hugo Cabret,” which served as the basis for Martin Scorsese’s widely praised but — to me, at least — frenetic and overwrought gimcrack fantasy “Hugo” (2011).

Wonderstruck” is a supple and flowing experience by comparison. Haynes, working from a script by Selznick, guides and serves the material with supreme craftsmanship. For a while, he casts a spell. Yet one of the film’s noteworthy qualities is that it creates a nearly dizzying sense of anticipation, and the payoff, regrettably,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Superstar: Todd Haynes's banned Karen Carpenter movie is visionary

The celebrated director’s retelling of Carpenter’s affliction by anorexia enraged her family, but compassionately reveals the objectification of female celebrity

Some films were made for the internet well before the internet was made for them. Todd Haynes’s Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story is one.

Made in 1987, while the future director of Carol and Velvet Goldmine was completing his Mfa at Bard College, the 43-minute curio – you can call it a short, but it has the narrative shape and scale of a feature-length biopic – was trickled through the film festival circuit the following year. Landing a lofty berth at the Toronto film festival, it fostered a select but vocal audience for its strange, beguilingly ragged form: charting the rise and fall of the anorexia-riven princess of oatmeal pop with a blend of archive miscellanea, artificial talking heads and, most crucially, a host of Barbie doll-enacted dramatisations. An exercise in patchwork postmodernism,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Private Lives: "Carol" and the Cinema of Todd Haynes

  • MUBI
For the longest time, it seemed like the last thing you should expect from Todd Haynes was a simple story. Coming out of the fertile 1990s Sundance scene, he was a provocateur and a delirious mash-up artist: his films were fractured narratives, or anti-narratives, or meta-narratives. His best work either smashed together wildly different styles and stories (as in his debut Poison [1991]), or presented unsettling, contradictory ideas but refused climax or closure (as in his masterpiece Safe [1995]). Even in a zeitgeist defined by Quentin Tarantino, the jukebox musicals Velvet Goldmine (1998) and I'm Not There (2007) looked like pastiche and homage taken to the farthest limit. But far more than Tarantino, Haynes, the former Ivy League semiotics student, insists on not simply getting swept away in the styles, but maintaining a critical viewpoint of how and why the styles function. In retrospect, everything about his method was already in place in his
See full article at MUBI »

Retro Sundance: 1991's Poison

Since we're not in Sundance this year, a look back at Sundance classics. Here's David on Poison...

Glenn kicked off our Sundance retrospective with a look at Desert Hearts, a film with more than a passing resemblance to Todd Haynes' Carol; a few years down the line, and we come to Haynes’ own appearance in the Utah festival, with his feature debut Poison. Winner of the 1991 festival’s Grand Jury Prize - Dramatic, Poison is considered a vital film in the ‘New Queer Cinema’ movement of the early 1990s, as coined by B. Ruby Rich the following year. Rich’s theory involved not just the presence of Lgbt characters and themes, but the queering of filmmaking form itself. Haynes had already demonstrated his inventive, radical eye in the controversial short film Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story, and Poison, with its triptych of homonymic narratives, consolidated the director’s manipulation
See full article at FilmExperience »

Watch: 1-Hour 44-Minute Conversation With Todd Haynes Covering His Career, Inspiration, And ‘Carol’

  • The Playlist
Since his controversial breakthrough with “Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story” — the suburban set pop-musical starring Barbie and Ken dolls — Todd Haynes has been breaking ground on new cinematic territory for nearly 30 years. The work that followed ‘Superstar,’ has been equally individual, and at most turns, a unique reimagining of events and scenarios that cut to the core of the subject matter. Read More: Retrospective: The Films Of Todd Haynes But for all of his idiosyncratic filmmaking, Haynes has been one of the most consistent filmmakers of his generation. From the beginning his intentions and fascinations were clear, and more or less, he has been working the same themes over and again ever since: the suburban, the transgressional, the “women’s picture,” the pop star. Though for all the similarities that run through his films, each is diverse, unique, and powerful — and in most cases better than the last. Recently Haynes
See full article at The Playlist »

Interview: Director Todd Haynes Plays the Right Notes in ‘Carol’

  • HollywoodChicago.com
Chicago – One of the best films of 2015 is the atmospheric and kinetically performed “Carol.” The film, set in the early 1950s, depicts a love that dares not speak its name, and also showcases the breathtaking presence of actress Cate Blanchett as the title character. The director of the film is the veteran Todd Haynes, known for another set-in-the-1950s classic, “Far from Heaven,” as well as “Velvet Goldmine,” “I’m Not There” and the recent HBO miniseries “Mildred Pierce.”

Haynes first got attention with a controversial short film way back in 1987, entitled “Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story.” It was the life story of the famous singer, told entirely by having the characters represented by Barbie dolls (it was withdrawn from circulation by a copyright lawsuit in 1990, more on that below). His feature debut, “Poison” (1991), won the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival. He followed that up with “Safe,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Nyfcc Awards Have Boosted Academy Award Chances for 'Carol,' Stewart and 'Saul'

New York Film Critics Awards: Best Film winner 'Carol' with Cate Blanchett. 2015 New York Film Critics Awards have enlivened Oscar race Catching up with previously announced awards season winners that will likely influence the 2016 Oscar nominations. Early this month, the New York Film Critics Circle announced their Best of 2015 picks, somewhat unexpectedly boosting the chances of Todd Haynes' lesbian romantic drama Carol, Clouds of Sils Maria actress Kristen Stewart, and László Nemes' Holocaust drama Son of Saul. Below is a brief commentary about each of these Nyfcc choices. 'Carol' Directed by Todd Haynes, starring two-time Oscar winner Cate Blanchett (The Aviator, Blue Jasmine) and Oscar nominee Rooney Mara (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo), and adapted by Phyllis Nagy from Patricia Highsmith's 1952 novel The Price of Salt,[1] Carol won a total of four New York Film Critics awards: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Carol review – Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara are dynamite

Todd Haynes’s flawless adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s novel is a ravishing tour de force

This superb adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s 1952 novel The Price of Salt doesn’t put a foot wrong. From Phyllis Nagy’s alluringly uncluttered script to Cate Blanchett’s sturdily tremulous performance as a society woman with everything to lose, this brilliantly captures the thrills, tears and fears of forbidden love. As the young shutterbug finding her true identity amid an atmosphere of perversely festive paranoia, Rooney Mara brings a touch of both frost and warmth to the screen, while Ed Lachman’s richly textured Super 16mm photography digs deep into the mid-century milieu.

But it is director Todd Haynes, oozing the confidence that defined 2002’s Far From Heaven, who is the real magician here, combining the subversive clout of his 1991 Jean Genet-inspired Poison with the flawlessly empathetic character study of 1995’s Safe
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Films of Todd Haynes: Performance, Desire, and Identity

Returning to the big screen after nearly a decade, queer maestro Todd Haynes presents his film Carol, based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith, a rapturous love story between Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara. In honor of the release, the Film Society at Lincoln Center has assembled a retrospective called “Todd Haynes: The Other Side of Dreams,” and, for our own appreciation, we’re taking a look back at his films.

Through glances, touches, performances, cleaning, singing, organizing, cooking, and sex, Todd Haynes has established himself as one of the most inventive filmmakers, and perhaps the most daringly unapologetic when it comes to broaching topics of identity, femininity, queerness, love, and desire. But his work is also imbued with passion and sensitivity, and he’s as invested in characters’ interior lives as he is playing intellectual games with the audience. Join us as we take a walk through his filmography.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Slideshow: Portraits & Voices From the Red Carpet at 51st Chicago International Film Festival

  • HollywoodChicago.com
Previous | Image 1 of 18 | NextSarah Silverman represented her new film, ‘I Smile Back.’

Chicago – The Red Carpet was well trod during the 51st Chicago International Film Festival. with film stars, directors and other personalities taking their walks in representing their films during the two weeks of the event. Photographer Joe Arce took the Exclusive Portraits, and Patrick McDonald got the soundbites.

Screenwriter Charlie Kaufman

Charlie Kaufman is the Oscar-nominated screenwriter known for his offbeat view of the world through films like “Being John Malkovich,” “Adaptation,” and “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.” He presented his latest film at the Festival, “Anomalisa.”

HollywoodChicago.com: How would you describe yourself if someone asks you why you write the type of stories that you write?

Charlie Kaufman: I just try to be honest, because I think that’s my job description as a writer. I try to present something that is true, so
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Watch an Hour-Long Career Retrospective with Todd Haynes and His Early Short Films

Carol! Carol! The people, they cannot get enough of Carol, which makes the eve of its release a perfect time to share some Todd Haynes-related material. (Not that there’s ever really a bad time, nor do we need much of an excuse.) It helps that he’s been “on tour” as of late, stopping by festivals to discuss things in his characteristically honest manner, and the latest example comes from the BFI London Film Festival. A Carol screening was accompanied by a Clare Stewart-led interview, but not one that follows the standard chronological format — not even one that’s indebted to focusing on any single title. What matters is the discussion, and even those who’d claim to know a ton about Haynes should find something enlightening.

We’ve paired that with two of his earlier works, Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story (a work long “banned” but nevertheless long-available) and Dottie Gets Spanked.
See full article at The Film Stage »

BAFTA to host Todd Haynes event

  • ScreenDaily
BAFTA to host Todd Haynes event
The director of Carol and I’m Not There will discuss his three decades in cinema.

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) has announced that Us director Todd Haynes will discuss his craft and career at an event in London on Nov 25.

As part of the ‘BAFTA: A Life in Pictures’ series, Haynes will discuss a career that includes unconventional Bob Dylan biopic I’m Not There and Cannes competition title Carol.

Haynes began his career making short films, including the controversial Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story in 1987, before progressing to features Poison in 1991 and Safe in 1995.

He garnered further attention with Velvet Goldmine, which was awarded Best Artistic Contribution at the 1998 Cannes Film Festival, and was nominated for the Palme D’Or, as well as two BAFTAs, winning the award for costume design.

Haynes’ next film, Far From Heaven, was a critical and commercial success and was nominated for four Golden Globes and four
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Film Review: ‘Granny’s Dancing On The Table’

Film Review: ‘Granny’s Dancing On The Table’
Disturbing Swedish drama “Granny’s Dancing On The Table,” from writer-helmer Hanna Skold, uses live action and stop-motion animation with voiceover narration to trace familial dysfunction and abuse through several generations. The live-action sequences follow a 13-year-old girl (Blanca Engstrom) on the cusp of puberty living with her controlling, religious zealot father (Lennart Jahkel), isolated from society. The claymation and puppet animation segments chronicle episodes from the lives of the girl’s forebears, women so maltreated by men that they go mad or run away. End result is both off-putting (the live action) and engrossing (the animation) and marks Skold as an idiosyncratic talent.

Dramas about dysfunctional families are about as typically Swedish as drinking glogg, but Skold provides a fresh twist with her rather primitive looking animated characters, whose story unfolds like a fairy tale. Just as Todd Haynes accomplished in his early-career Barbie-based biopic “Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

BFI London Film Festival 2015 Line-Up announced with Gala screenings of Steve Jobs, High-Rise, Trumbo, Black Mass, Carol & Suffragette

The 59Th BFI London Film Festival Announces Full 2015 Programme

You can peruse the programme at your leisure here.

The programme for the 59th BFI London Film Festival in partnership launched today, with Festival Director Clare Stewart presenting this year’s rich and diverse selection of films and events. BFI London Film Festival is Britain’s leading film event and one of the world’s oldest film festivals. It introduces the finest new British and international films to an expanding London and UK-wide audience. The Festival provides an essential platform for films seeking global success; and promotes the careers of British and international filmmakers through its industry and awards programmes. With this year’s industry programme stronger than ever, offering international filmmakers and leaders a programme of insightful events covering every area of the film industry‎ Lff positions London as the world’s leading creative city.

The Festival will screen a
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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