Angel Heart (1987) - News Poster

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October Horrors 2017 Day 22 – Angel Heart (1987)

Angel Heart, 1987.

Directed by Alan Parker.

Starring Mickey Rourke, Robert De Niro, Lisa Bonet, and Charlotte Rampling.

Synopsis:

It’s 1955, and New York-based private investigator Harry Angel is hired by the mysterious businessmen Louis Cyphre to track down Johnny Favourite, an elusive lounge singer who owes Cyphre a very large debt. As he investigates, Angel finds himself embroiled in a dark mystery of violence, murder, and mysticism, with the hunt for Favourite leaving many bodies in its wake.

With its dodgy dames, greasy gumshoes, dimly lit alleys, and jazzy booze soaked mysteries, noir is simply one of the coolest and most fascinating genres ever to have existed.

Noir while fascinating on its own is, in my view, at its most engaging and interesting when writers and directors try to mix it with other genres. An easy example to point to would be Ridley Scott’s melding of noir with science
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Class of 1987: Sex, Voodoo, and Mickey Rourke: The Magic of Angel Heart

I was seven years old when Angel Heart was released. I had absolutely no business whatsoever seeing the film at that age, but my stepdad at the time was obsessed with all things film-related, so he would drag me to just about every single movie that hit our local theater, and it just happened to be that 1987 was the year I spent hanging out in theaters the most.

My earliest recollection of the film was a news piece about how controversial the film’s sex scene between Mickey Rourke’s Harry Angel and Lisa Bonet’s Epiphany Proudfoot characters was, and how it had to be trimmed down just to score an R rating. Even as a kid, I was enthralled by the idea of a film being dangerous and that news piece I saw made me want to see whatever weird, Satanically-inclined film they were billing Angel Heart as.
See full article at DailyDead »

‘Hannibal’ Season 4: Bryan Fuller Says Christopher Nolan Holds the Key to the Series’ Future

‘Hannibal’ Season 4: Bryan Fuller Says Christopher Nolan Holds the Key to the Series’ Future
Much has been written about “Hannibal” returning for a fourth season ever since the acclaimed NBC series signed off the air in August 2015. Creator Bryan Fuller has been vocal about his wish to continue the series, and his enthusiasm for more “Hannibal” was on full display during a video appearance at New York’s Split Screens Festival on Thursday night. Fuller lit up anytime someone floated the idea of new “Hannibal” episodes, so much so that it seemed clear Season 4 is no longer an “if” but a “when.”

Read More: Bryan Fuller Has Pitched ‘Hannibal’ Season 4 to Hugh Dancy and Mads Mikkelsen, and They’re ‘Keen On It’

Fuller has teased what he has in mind for a potential Season 4 in previous interviews, including the use of elements from “The Silence of the Lambs.” The rights to the story have been owned by the producers of Jonathan Demme’s movie
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Hannibal’ Season 4: Bryan Fuller Says Christopher Nolan Holds the Key to the Series’ Future

‘Hannibal’ Season 4: Bryan Fuller Says Christopher Nolan Holds the Key to the Series’ Future
Much has been written about “Hannibal” returning for a fourth season ever since the acclaimed NBC series signed off the air in August 2015. Creator Bryan Fuller has been vocal about his wish to continue the series, and his enthusiasm for more “Hannibal” was on full display during a video appearance at New York’s Split Screens Festival on Thursday night. Fuller lit up anytime someone floated the idea of new “Hannibal” episodes, so much so that it seemed clear Season 4 is no longer an “if” but a “when.”

Read More: Bryan Fuller Has Pitched ‘Hannibal’ Season 4 to Hugh Dancy and Mads Mikkelsen, and They’re ‘Keen On It’

Fuller has teased what he has in mind for a potential Season 4 in previous interviews, including the use of elements from “The Silence of the Lambs.” The rights to the story have been owned by the producers of Jonathan Demme’s movie
See full article at Indiewire »

Champs-Élysées Film Festival — June 15th to 22nd 2017 — Sixth Edition

Champs-Élysées Film Festival — June 15th to 22nd 2017 — Sixth Edition
The Champs-Élysées Film Festival, created by producer, distributor and exhibitor Sophie Dulac, is a commitment to Parisian audiences for a cinematic trip between France and the USA showcasing the best of French and American independent cinema and highlighting New Orleans.

Six American indies and six French indies will judged for two separate awards and will also receive audience awards. The 2017 Jury consist of talents coming from all kinds of backgrounds and having a strong involvement in French independent cinema : — Lolita Chammah, actress, — Lola Créton, actress, — Vincent Dedienne, actor, humorist and author, — Jérémie Elkaïm, actor, screenwriter and director, — Camélia Jordana, singer and actress, — Gustave Kervern, director and actor — Karidja Touré, actress.

Classic Claude Brasseur back when…

The classic French actor Claude Brasseur will be the Guest of Honor along with the American director Alex Ross Perry and director Jerry Schatzberg. Other guests include directors Arnaud and Jean-Marie Larrieu, the French actress Aïssa Maïga.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

William Hjortsberg Dies: ‘Legend’ & ‘Angel Heart’ Screenwriter Was 76

William Hjortsberg Dies: ‘Legend’ & ‘Angel Heart’ Screenwriter Was 76
William Hjortsberg, screenwriter of the 1985 Tom Cruise fantasy film Legend and 1987 Mickey Rourke devilish noir Angel Heart, died last month of pancreatic cancer at age 76. The death was reported by The Livingston Enterprise, newspaper of Hjortsberg’s hometown Livingston, Montana. Hjortsberg, born in New York, was a novelist with four books to his credit when his Falling Angel was published in 1978. He’d later adapt the tale into Angel Heart, a high-profile demonic…
See full article at Deadline »

William Hjortsberg, Screenwriter of 'Legend' and 'Angel Heart,' Dies at 76

William Hjortsberg, Screenwriter of 'Legend' and 'Angel Heart,' Dies at 76
Author William Hjortsberg, who wrote the screenplay for Legend and the novel Falling Angel (which was adapted into the film Angel Heart), died April 22 in Livingston, Mont., according to his hometown paper. He was 76.

The cause of death was pancreatic cancer, family friend Joanne Gardner said.

Hjortsberg, known to friends as “Gatz,” was the author of 10 books and three screenplays. His most prominent novel was 1978's Falling Angel, which mixed horror and detective fiction. The 1987 film version, Angel Heart, starred Robert De Niro, Mickey Rourke and Lisa Bonet and attracted controversy for a graphic...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

30 Years Back: Celebrating the Cinematic Delights of 1987

Tom Jolliffe celebrates the cinematic delights of 1987…

The 80’s mark a special period in cinema for me. It’s predominantly an age thing. I grew up throughout the 80’s, soaking in some fantastic films. It was a rising golden age of blockbusters which took the foundations of what guys like Spielberg and Lucas launched in the late 70’s, as that stark, gritty and dramatically challenging output that delivered some of the best films of all time (The Godfather and more), gave way to more crowd pleasing, optimistic fare. The cinematic landscape went from the likes of The French Connection, The Conversation, and Chinatown to the more light-hearted Star Wars or Jaws.

As blockbusters swarmed the cinemas and multiplexes began spreading, audiences demanded entertainment. That trend has carried on and intensified and it’s truer than ever in these days of Marvel adaptations. The 80’s got me into cinema. That passion
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

A Descent into Hell: Angel Heart (1987) – A 30th Anniversary Retrospective

Written and directed by British maverick filmmaker Alan Parker and adapted from the novel Falling Angel by William Hjortsberg, Angel Heart is a mystery pastiche of hardboiled film noir and psychological supernatural occult horror, a hybrid of Chandler-esque detective story… Continue Reading →

The post A Descent into Hell: Angel Heart (1987) – A 30th Anniversary Retrospective appeared first on Dread Central.
See full article at Dread Central »

Revisiting Alan Parker's Angel Heart

Brogan Morris Oct 13, 2017

Has Mickey Rourke ever had as good a role as he got in Angel Heart? We take a look back...

Once considered a successor to Marlon Brando and Robert De Niro, Mickey Rourke unlike those other mumbling screen titans made few stone-cold classics in his prime. In fact, prior to his late-career ‘comeback’ with The Wrestler in 2009, hardly any of this once-vaunted actor’s pictures felt like true all-timers. Where Brando had A Streetcar Named Desire and On The Waterfront, and De Niro had Taxi Driver and Raging Bull, Rourke had Rumble Fish, a teen angst curiosity from Francis Ford Coppola; he had The Pope Of Greenwich Village, an overblown rehash of De Niro’s own Mean Streets, and erotic thriller 9 1/2 weeks, which now looks like a dated precursor to Fifty Shades of Grey. Even Diner – Rourke’s celebrated 1982 breakout – today feels slight and forgettable.

Angel Heart,
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Angel Heart’: Hell Hath No Fury Like the Devil Scorned

Today, March 6th, Sir Alan Parker‘s Angel Heart turns thirty, thus creating a golden opportunity for yet another appreciation of what was considered by many an over-stylized satanic shock-fest back in the 80s but has since revealed itself to be, in this writer’s humble opinion, one of the best psychological horrors in the history of American cinema. Read our take on it, though a disclaimer should be made for those who have yet to watch Parker’s mercilessly dark and sinister masterpiece: as the film depends to some extent on the gradual reveal of the mystery central to its narrative – the many elements of which shall be discussed in the following piece – the best way to experience it is with as little insight as possible, and only then compare your view with ours. This is due to the fact that Angel Heart boasts one of the great twists of 1980s,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Mickey Rourke Signs With Apa

Mickey Rourke Signs With Apa
Mickey Rourke is getting in the ring with Apa. The Wrestler star has signed with the agency for representation.

Rourke started his career in Lawrence Kasdan's hit feature film Body Heat, with other early career roles in Francis Ford Coppola's Rumble Fish, Barfly, Angel Heart and the erotic thriller 9 1/2 Weeks, where he starred opposite Kim Basinger.

In the early '90s, Rourke left acting to try his hand at a career in professional boxing, retiring a few years later and returning to Hollywood.

He starred alongside Bruce Willis in Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez's Sin City and gained major recognition for his role in Darren Aronofsky's The...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Alan Parker on the Curse of Video Village, Working With DPs, Actors

Alan Parker on the Curse of Video Village, Working With DPs, Actors
Bydgoszcz, Poland — Alan Parker’s remarkable record of critical and audience successes — an unlikely feat considering he’s made just 14 films since 1976’s “Bugsy Malone” — also display a surprising range of style and genres from musicals, including “Fame” and “Evita” to actor vehicles “Birdy” and “Angel Heart,” and fact-based political stories such as “Mississippi Burning.” He chairs the main competition jury at the Camerimage film festival this year, considering work from 15 countries that incorporates standout cinematography.

Your career-long partnership with Dp Michael Seresin has resulted in striking visuals in all your films. How did your process work together in creating so many different looks and moods?

Ironically, the time we won the Academy Award, for “Mississippi Burning” it was Peter Biziou, it wasn’t Michael Seresin. But Michael has done most of them. And prior to doing film he probably did a hundred commercials with me too.

So you had
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Mickey Rourke’s Face

Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez's Sin City (2005) is playing on Mubi June 18 - July 17, 2016 in the United States. Sin CityWhat happens when a performer’s face changes? This very question animated a bewildering piece by Owen Gleiberman last month in Variety, wherein Gleiberman—a man—pondered whether Renée Zellweger’s slightly aged, maybe plastic surgery-tinkered visage made her an entirely different performer. He sustained this mediation on the basis of a whopping three-minute trailer for Bridget Jones’ sBaby, hoarily declaring his good intentions to combat Hollywood’s sexist machinations at his piece’s onset. Yet, in spite of this pretense, his approach exhibited an astonishing lack of stringency, ultimately scrutinizing Zellweger along the same sexist lines he claimed to bemoan. Like others, I find this storied practice of male critics inspecting women’s faces pretty odious. If male critics have gotten craftier than such forefathers as John Simon (who,
See full article at MUBI »

The 20 Best Detective Movies of All Time

From a pop culture perspective, private detectives stand for all that’s memorable about film noir. The indifference, the wittiness, and the moral ambiguity that define each urban knight has since become the stuff of parodied legend. We’re talking about the mediators between the crooks and the cops, the embodiment of back alley grayness that’s so tough to pin down. P.I.’s could cooperate with the law if needed, but they could just as soon do business with the bad guys for the right price. To a certain extent, that is – shamus work has always attracted the ignored and the ethical. The Wild West has mythical men with no name, The Asphalt Jungle has names with investigating licenses attached to them. Instead of a poncho and a ten gallon hat, they’re provided a fedora and trench coat.

The archetype has undergone many faces throughout Hollywood’s history,
See full article at CinemaNerdz »

Sound Shock: The Haunting Music of Alan Parker’s Angel Heart

Sound Shock discusses the haunting conceptual soundtrack album for Angel Heart. I am obsessed with Alan Parker’s 1987 film Angel Heart. The look of it. The feel of it. The sound of it. In case you have yet to absorb this one, here’s the skinny… New York, 1955. A grimy, suffocating post-war metropolis whose labyrinthine…

The post Sound Shock: The Haunting Music of Alan Parker’s Angel Heart appeared first on Shock Till You Drop.
See full article at shocktillyoudrop »

Icon of Cool Charlotte Rampling Talks '45 Years,' Sculpting Her Acting Muscles, and Working with Woody Allen

Icon of Cool Charlotte Rampling Talks '45 Years,' Sculpting Her Acting Muscles, and Working with Woody Allen
The longer you talk to Charlotte Rampling, the more you are drawn into her hooded eyes, her laid back insouciance, her mature strength. This is a woman who has lived. I want to read her memoir. Based in Paris, she's worked in English with Sidney Lumet ("The Verdict"), Alan Parker ("Angel Heart"), Woody Allen ("Stardust Memories") and Lars von Trier ("Melancholia"), French with Francois Ozon (Cesar-nominated "Under the Sand" and "Swimming Pool") and Italian with directors Luchino Visconti ("The Damned") and Lilliana Cavani ("The Night Porter"). Over the course of the year "45 Years" (Sundance Selects, December 23) has been blazing a festival trail from Berlin (where Courtenay and Rampling won Best Actor and Actress) to Telluride and Toronto. Haigh adapted "45 Years" from a short story by poet David Constantine, which anticipates the anniversary of Geoff and Kate’s seemingly...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Creed | Review

What’s in a Name?: Coogler’s Impressive Rocky Spinoff

After taking home the top prize at the Sundance Film Festival in 2013 with Fruitvale Station, director Ryan Coogler moved into studio franchise filmmaking with Creed for his sophomore effort. It’s a questionable move, seeing as the film is a spinoff from Sylvester Stallone’s iconic Rocky series, a legacy spawning six films, the last unfurling in 2006. Co-writing the screenplay with first time screenwriter Aaron Covington, Coogler’s perspective concerns the abandoned offspring of Rocky Balboa’s frenemy Apollo Creed (played by Carl Weathers) and his rise to fame. Considering its breakneck speed through arguably slim running time and retread of the general motions we’ve seen in nearly every boxing odyssey committed to celluloid, Coogler manages a compelling character study hinging on dynamic emotional motifs concerning the nature of legacy and the definition of family. Though not as
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Matthew Libatique Talks the Cinematographer’s Bond, Critical Attention, ‘Chi-Raq,’ and More

Having had a long career of making good films look great and making bad films look good, Matthew Libatique is one of the best living judges of cinematography. It thus makes sense that the world’s foremost cinematography-oriented festival, Camerimage, would turn him into a recurring figure on their Main Competition jury. While attending the festival, we both sat down for a brief, albeit revealing talk, one mostly centered on his mindset as an influential voice in this specific world — as well as the insecurities that come with the position — and the bonds shared by fellow cinematographers.

You’re on the Main Competition jury. How many times have you done this?

This is my third year here. It’s my second time participating as a juror. The first time I came, Darren [Aronfsky] and I got the Duo Award, which was an honor, but it took me years, actually, to come here.
See full article at The Film Stage »

The top 20 underappreciated films of 1987

From anime to pitch-black thrillers, here's our pick of the underappreciated movies of 1987...

Sometimes, the challenge with these lists isn't just what to put in, but what to leave out. We loved Princess Bride, but with a decent showing at the box office and a huge cult following, isn't it a bit too popular to be described as underappreciated? Likewise Joe Dante's Innerspace, a fabulously geeky, comic reworking of the 60s sci-fi flick, Fantastic Voyage.

What we've gone for instead is a mix of genre fare, dramas and animated films that may have garnered a cult following since, but didn't do well either critically or financially at the time of release. Some of the movies on our list just about made their money back, but none made anything close to the sort of returns enjoyed by the likes of 1987's biggest films - Three Men And A Baby, Fatal Attraction
See full article at Den of Geek »
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