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Morelia: ‘Tempestad’s’ Tatiana Huezo Adapts ‘Prayers for the Stolen’ for Fiction Debut, ‘Noche de Fuego’ (Exclusive)

Morelia: ‘Tempestad’s’ Tatiana Huezo Adapts ‘Prayers for the Stolen’ for Fiction Debut, ‘Noche de Fuego’ (Exclusive)
Director of “Tempestad,” Mexico’s foreign-language Oscar submission, Tatiana Huezo, already one of Mexico’s most distinguished women filmmakers, will make her fiction feature debut, “Noche de fuego,” adapting Jennifer Clement’s “Prayers for the Stolen.”

One of the most buzzed-up projects at Morelia’s Sundance Lab, “Noche de fuego” is produced by Nicolas Celis and Jim Jarmusch collaborator Jim Stark (“Down By Law”) and is set up at Celis’ Pimienta Films, producer of Huezo’s docu-feature debut “The Tiniest Place” and “Tempestad,” and also a lead-producer on Alfonso Cuarón’s upcoming Spanish-language movie “Roma,” and a co-producer on “Pájaros del verano,” also in post, from Academy Award-nominated Colombian Ciro Guerra (“Embrace of the Serpent”).

Tempestad” is also nominated for an International Emmy Award and is Mexico’s candidate for next February’s 32nd Spanish Academy Goya Awards, where it has currently made the last-16 longlist for Best Ibero-American Film.

El Salvador-born,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Blade Runner 2049’: Will Strong Reviews, Ryan Gosling Push Sequel to Success?

‘Blade Runner 2049’: Will Strong Reviews, Ryan Gosling Push Sequel to Success?
One of the most memorable moments at this year’s CinemaCon came on opening night when Sony Motion Picture Group chairman Tom Rothman debuted footage for “Blade Runner 2049” and said, “Netflix, my ass.”

Six months later, domestic distributor Warner Bros., international distributor and production partner Sony and production company Alcon Entertainment are about to find out whether the Denis Villeneuve-directed sequel to Ridley Scott’s iconic 1982 original has what it takes to get filmgoers off the couch.

It’s starting to look promising for the sequel, which opens Oct. 6 and stars Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford reprising his Rick Deckard character from the 1982 film. Sony co-financed the production with Alcon Entertainment, while Warner Bros. handles the domestic rollout through its longstanding output deal with Alcon.

It’s highly beneficial that the original is held in such high regard, Rothman says, but adds that “Blade Runner 2049” is being pitched very much on its own, rather
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscars: Mexico Selects 'Tempestad' for Foreign-Language Category

Oscars: Mexico Selects 'Tempestad' for Foreign-Language Category
Tempestad, Tatiana Huezo's hard-hitting documentary about victims of the human-trafficking trade, has been chosen as Mexico's submission for foreign-language film Oscar consideration.

Mexico's film academy on Wednesday announced it will also submit Tempestad to vie for best foreign picture for Spain's 32nd Goya Awards in February.

The pic follows two loosely connected narratives of women who have suffered the brutal consequences of human trafficking in Mexico.

Jim Jarmusch collaborator Jim Stark (Down by Law) executive produced Tempestad alongside brothers Nicolas and Sebastian Celis, producers of Oscar-winning director Alfonso Cuaron's latest picture, Roma.

Salvadoran-born writer-director Huezo won high praise on the festival circuit for her first work, The Tiniest Place (El Lugar Mas Pequeno), a powerful documentary that reflects on...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Kneejerk Reactions To The Oscar Nominations And The Final Word On 2017

Even when you live in Los Angeles, as I do, if you’re not in the network of critics groups and press screening and screener DVDs it can be a challenge to keep up with everything you tell yourself you have to see before attempting an informed roundup of the year currently in the rearview mirror. And I also try to not let more than a couple of weeks of the new year go by before checking in, regardless of how many of the year’s big presents I have left to unwrap, though in past years I have not lived well by this dictum—let’s just say that if I’m still posting stuff on the year’s best after even Oscar has thoroughly chewed over the goods, as has happened in the past, well, I’ve overstayed my welcome.

2016 was, in most ways, a disaster of a year,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Best of Movie Poster of the Day: Part 16

  • MUBI
Above: Mondo poster for The Graduate (Mike Nichols, USA, 1967); artist: Rory Kurtz; lettering: Jay Shaw.On my daily movie poster Tumblr I don’t make a habit of posting fan art or art prints—call them what you will—because I’m most interested in the intersection of commerce and art that is the theatrical movie poster. But I make an exception when something stands out, and nothing stood out last year quite like Rory Kurtz’s beautiful, elegant and unexpected Mondo illustration for The Graduate, which quite rightly racked up over 200 more likes than even its nearest competitor. But its nearest competitor was fan art too: a brilliant poster for Badlands by the insanely talented Adam Juresko, whose art poster for In the Mood for Love (featured in my Maggie Cheung article) was also in the top four. What makes art posters easy to like—beyond their extraordinary artistry
See full article at MUBI »

‘Paterson’ Oral History: 5 Longtime Jim Jarmusch Collaborators Reveal What It’s Like to Work with Him

  • Indiewire
‘Paterson’ Oral History: 5 Longtime Jim Jarmusch Collaborators Reveal What It’s Like to Work with Him
A Jim Jarmusch movie is unmistakable. He’s a storyteller who favors richness of detail over plot, whether it’s reunited vampires (“Only Lovers Left Alive”), escaped prisoners (“Down By Law”), or a cousin visiting from Budapest (“Stranger Than Paradise”). Small in scale, generous in production value, and tempered with idiosyncratic rhythms and dry humor, his films represent one the most original and uncompromised bodies of work in American cinema.

However, while Jarmusch might seem to be an auteur-theory poster child, the filmmaker told IndieWire’s David Ehrlich in 2014 (then writing for The Guardian) that he doesn’t believe, for him, the concept of director-as-author applies:

“I put ‘A film by’ as a protection of my rights, but I don’t really believe it. It’s important for me to have a final cut, and I do for every film. So I’m in the editing room every day, I
See full article at Indiewire »

Jim Jarmusch: ‘I shy away from sex in my films. It makes me nervous’

After almost 40 years in cinema, the director remains the quintessential leftfield auteur. He discusses how his gentle new film Paterson offers a Zen alternative to blockbuster chaos

Related: Paterson review – Adam Driver beguiling in miraculous tale of everyday goodness | Peter Bradshaw's film of the week

There’s a line in Jim Jarmusch’s 1986 film Down By Law that seems apposite in November 2016. It goes: “My mama used to say that America’s the big melting pot. You bring it to a boil and all the scum rises to the top.”

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Criterion Close-Up – Episode 51 – Mystery Train & Jim Jarmusch

Mark and Aaron are joined by Marcus Pinn to explore the filmography of Jim Jarmusch, beginning with Mystery Train (1989). We explore the triple storyline, the coalescence of the director’s indie experience and arthouse sensibilities, and the film’s sense of place. We then dive into his library and style, and choose our five favorite Jarmusch films.

About the film:

Aloof teenage Japanese tourists, a frazzled Italian widow, and a disgruntled British immigrant all converge in the city of dreams—which, in Mystery Train, from Jim Jarmusch, is Memphis. Made with its director’s customary precision and wit, this triptych of stories pays playful tribute to the home of Stax Records, Sun Studio, Graceland, Carl Perkins, and, of course, the King, who presides over the film like a spirit. Mystery Train is one of Jarmusch’s very best movies, a boozy and beautiful pilgrimage to an iconic American ghost town
See full article at CriterionCast »

‘Gimme Danger’ Exclusive Images: Jim Jarmusch’s New Documentary Recounts The History of The Stooges

  • Indiewire
‘Gimme Danger’ Exclusive Images: Jim Jarmusch’s New Documentary Recounts The History of The Stooges
Director Jim Jarmusch is currently having quite a busy year. He has two films set for release: “Paterson,” starring Adam Driver as a bus driver and poet living in New Jersey, and the documentary “Gimme Danger,” which recounts the history of Iggy Pop and The Stooges. Forming the band in the late 1960’s, Iggy Pop was a provocateur, performing half-naked and stage diving while confronting the audience with such classic numbers as “I Wanna Be Your Dog,” “Search and Destroy,” and “Raw Power.” Featuring brand-new interviews with Iggy Pop, Jarmusch looks back at one of the seminal American rock bands, their impact on the culture, and the circumstances of their reformation in 2003. Check out two exclusive images from the film below.

Read More: Cannes 2016: Iggy Pop Says ‘Gimme Danger’ Was Made With Help From ‘Drug Dealers and Bootleggers’

This is Jarmusch’s second music documentary. His first is entitled “Year of the Horse,
See full article at Indiewire »

Adam Driver’s ‘Paterson’ Gets Awards-Season Release Date (Exclusive)

Adam Driver’s ‘Paterson’ Gets Awards-Season Release Date (Exclusive)
Jim Jarmusch’s “Paterson” will hit theaters at the end of 2016, Variety has learned.

Amazon Studios is backing the indie drama and is partnering with Bleecker Street on the film’s release. The movie will get a platform release, expanding its theatrical footprint gradually. It will debut on Dec. 28, which allows it to qualify for awards. That’s a busy time of year, one that will also see the launches of Oscar contenders such as “Toni Erdmann,” an acclaimed German comedy, and “Patriot’s Day,” a drama about the Boston Marathon bombing.

Paterson” centers on a bus driver (Adam Driver of “Girls” and “Star Wars: The Force Awakens”), following him on his daily routine, as he ferries passengers around the city of Paterson, N.J. All the while, the driver, who is also named Paterson, channels his observations into poetry, scratching out his writing in a notebook that he carries.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ava DuVernay Original Prison Documentary Set To Open The 54th New York Film Festival

  • LRM Online
The Film Society of Lincoln Center announces Ava DuVernay’s documentary The 13th as the Opening Night selection of the 54th New York Film Festival (September 30 – October 16), making its world premiere at Alice Tully Hall. The 13th is the first-ever nonfiction work to open the festival, and will debut on Netflix and open in a limited theatrical run on October 7.

Chronicling the history of racial inequality in the United States, The 13th examines how our country has produced the highest rate of incarceration in the world, with the majority of those imprisoned being African-American. The title of DuVernay’s extraordinary and galvanizing film refers to the 13th Amendment to the Constitution—“Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States . . . ” The progression from that second qualifying clause to the horrors of mass incarceration and
See full article at LRM Online »

Ava DuVernay’s ‘The 13th’ Will Open the 2016 New York Film Festival

If the languid summer tentpole season has you down, fear not, as the promising fall slate is around the corner and today brings the first news of what we’ll see at the 2016 New York Film Festival. For the first time ever, a non-fiction film will open The Film Society of Lincoln Center’s festival: Ava DuVernay‘s The 13th. Her timely follow-up to Selma chronicles the history of racial inequality in the United States and will arrive on Netflix and in limited theaters shortly after its premiere at Nyff, on October 7.

“It is a true honor for me and my collaborators to premiere The 13th as the opening night selection of the New York Film Festival,” Ava DuVernay says. “This film was made as an answer to my own questions about how and why we have become the most incarcerated nation in the world, how and why we regard
See full article at The Film Stage »

Jim Jarmusch Talks ‘Paterson,’ His Love for Poetry & Hip-Hop, Tilda Swinton, and Being Grateful

Legendary American independent filmmaker Jim Jarmusch has been a frequent visitor to the Cannes Film Festival ever since winning the Camera d’Or for Stranger Than Paradise in 1984. He took the Grand Jury prize in 2005 for Broken Flowers but has never managed to nab the Big One. His latest film, Paterson, which premiered last week in competition here, is the story of a bus driver (played by Adam Driver) named Paterson who lives in Paterson NJ, walks his wife’s bulldog, Marvin, and writes poems in his spare time. We sat down with the great silver-haired Son of Lee Marvin to talk hip-hop, Tilda Swinton, and the poetry of everyday things.

Some critics have called this your most personal film. How do would you respond to a statement like that?

I don’t know. With our last film, Only Lovers Left Alive, everyone said “Aha! His most personal film!” I don’t know.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Match Factory orders Jim Jarmusch’s 'Coffee And Cigarettes'

  • ScreenDaily
Match Factory orders Jim Jarmusch’s 'Coffee And Cigarettes'
Exclusive: Film becomes the seventh Jarmusch title in the company’s classic collection.

Cult director Jim Jarmusch is a major presence at this year’s Cannes with two films in official selection. Now, one of his classics from a decade ago, Coffee And Cigarettes (2003), has been added to The Match Factory’s Jarmusch library

The Match Factory’s Jarmusch library already includes Permanent Vacation (1980), Stranger Than Paradise (1984), Down By Law (1986), Mystery Train (1989), Night On Earth (1991), and Dead Man (1995). With the addition of Coffee And Cigarettes, there are are seven Jarmusch titles in the Tmf classic collection.

Coffee And Cigarettes consists of a series of short films shot over a period of almost 20 years, featuring icons like Tom Waits, Iggy Pop, Roberto Benigni, Bill Murray and Cate Blanchett.

“With the motif of coffee and smoke, Jim Jarmusch has brought together the most outstanding figures from the film and music scene. I’m thrilled to handle this original and timeless
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The Alchemist Cookbook D.P Adam J. Minnick on lensing the Hermit in the Woods

  • Cinelinx
If you've had the privilege to see a film lensed by D.P Adam J. Minnick, you'd have recognized an eye disciplined by the story it's telling rather than by personal inclinations or some sybaritic style that steals from the story. Buzzard, was shot super raw and cold on a 5D, The Alchemist Cookbook was shot formally composed with a warm palllete on an Alexa, and Actor Martinez (Us Premiering this April at Tribeca) was shot with Altman inspired slow zooms on a Red Epic Dragon. The aesthetic decisions and stories speak for his adaptability and understanding of the form. And, his latest release, The Alchemist Cookbook, which hit SXSW hard when it world premiered, has audiences, critics, and filmmakers predominately sitting on the 'loved it' side of its divisive disposition.

We were fortunate to talk with the cinematographer on how the hell the team pulled it off.

Could you
See full article at Cinelinx »

The Alchemist Cookbook Director Of Photography Adam J. Minnick on lensing the Hermit in the Woods

  • Cinelinx
Could you give us a general overview of your working relationship with Joel?

Joel and I are first and foremost friends...he's always been one of my closest. We've been making music, watching films and making little movies together starting in high school. He and I were really the only two buddies in our tight group that pursued visual arts of any sort through college and beyond, so it made sense that one day we could ultimately work together on a professional level, too. There's a trust that I can't really put into words, but we know that it's there. The Alchemist Cookbook was a new endeavor into a different filmmaking experience for both of us, and his trust in me as an image maker was very clear from the beginning. As far as collaborative art goes, I've never been more aligned with anyone, so I consider myself very fortunate
See full article at Cinelinx »

Berlin: Cinephil Stirs Up a ‘Tempestad’

Berlin: Cinephil Stirs Up a ‘Tempestad’
Tel Aviv-based documentary sales company Cinephil has acquired “Tempestad” from director Tatiana Huezo (“The Tiniest Place”).

Tempestad” makes its world premiere Saturday in Berlin’s Forum. It is produced by Mexico’s Pimienta Films, which also co-produced Rafi Pitts’ Berlin competition entry, “Soy Nero.” Jim Stark (“Down by Law,” “Mystery Train,” “Night on Earth”) executive produced “Tempestad.”

Tempestad” traces a woman’s 1,200 mile journey back to her home in southern Mexico after she’s realeased from prison in the north. Her off-camera narration mixes with a second woman’s story, their voices echoing over shots of the landscapes and highways of Mexico.

“ ‘Tempestad’ fits perfectly with our portfolio of socially aware films. In addition, the filmmakers have incredible integrity, an aesthetic vision and a strong authorial voice,” said Cinephil’s Philippa Kowarsky.

For us, working with Tatiana was also an opportunity to highlight the enormous amount of talent of Mexican woman directors,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: ‘Sound of Redemption: The Frank Morgan Story’

Film Review: ‘Sound of Redemption: The Frank Morgan Story’
An all-too-familiar story of a charismatic yet self-destructive artist is presented with sympathetic tact — and, better still, a relatively happy ending — in “Sound of Redemption: The Frank Morgan Story,” Nc Heikin’s affectionate portrait of the late jazz great once viewed as a musical heir to Charlie “Bird” Parker. The documentary adroitly sustains interest with a standard-issue mix of archival material, interviews with intimates and admirers, actors’ voiceovers and dramatic re-creations. But jazz aficionados and mainstream audiences alike probably will be more captivated by the extended riffs during a 2012 tribute concert performed at San Quentin State Prison — where Frank Morgan (1933-2007) spent a goodly portion of his troubled life.

Although he was the son of another notable musician — guitarist Stanley Morgan of the Ink Spots — young Frank was drawn to Parker while still in his teens as a mentor and father figure. Like Parker, he chose the alto saxophone as his signature instrument,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Music and Rebellion in ‘A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night’

The phrase “first Iranian vampire western” will follow A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, and its director Anna Lily Amirpour, until the end of cinema itself. A year and a half after it glided sexily into Sundance, the movie has made waves for its genre play, for Sheila Vand’s already iconic vampire look, and for its incredible, eclectic soundtrack. The movie has been in vogue ever since, even though there appears to be little beneath its chador-clad exterior to chew upon. Part of the explanation is never mentioned in its buzzy tagline, but most of the attraction is really down to its story of misfit rebellion, a James Dean tale with a Donnie Darko-esque soundtrack, by way of Iran.

There are, as is frequently mentioned, a lot of similarities with Jim Jarmusch’s earlier movies Stranger Than Paradise or Down By Law. This extends beyond the black-and-white shots of urban tedium,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

What’s Up Doc?: Sheffield & AFI Docs Signal the Summer Fest Drought

  • ioncinema
Well folks, after a rather long and brutal winter (at least for me here in Buffalo), we are finally heading into the wonderful warmth of summer, but with that blast of sunshine and steamy humidity comes the mid-year drought of major film fests. After the Sheffield Doc/Fest concludes on June 10th and AFI Docs wraps on June 21st, we likely won’t see any major influx in our charts until Locarno, Venice, Telluride and Tiff announce their line-ups in rapid succession. In the meantime, we can look forward to the intriguing onslaught of films making their debut in Sheffield, including Brian Hill’s intriguing examination of Sweden’s most notorious serial killer, The Confessions of Thomas Quick, and Sean McAllister’s film for which he himself was jailed in the process of making, A Syrian Love Story, the only two films world premiering in the festival’s main competition.
See full article at ioncinema »
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