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Claude Lanzmann's "The Four Sisters"

  • MUBI
The Four Sisters: The Hippocratic OathIn a review of Claude Lanzmann’s memoir, Adam Shatz observes that “self-flattery is characteristically Lanzmannian.” This sort of self-regard often manifests itself in interviews that the filmmaker grants to journalists and proved grating indeed in Napalm, a Lanzmann documentary screened as a “Special Presentation” at Cannes in 2017. During a recent trip to North Korea enshrined in Napalm—which offers a cursory look at the historical roots of the hermit kingdom’s totalitarian impulses—Lanzmann emerges as considerably more preoccupied with celebrating his youthful dalliance with a North Korean nurse during an earlier visit in the 1950s as a member of a leftist delegation. With Lanzmann, however, it’s often necessary to swallow a little of his self-aggrandizement in order to appreciate his genuine accomplishments. Contradictions abound inasmuch as his best work, such as the magisterial Shoah, is both formally audacious and historically focused while a minor work like Tsahal,
See full article at MUBI »

Film Review: ‘Intent to Destroy: Death, Denial & Depiction’

Film Review: ‘Intent to Destroy: Death, Denial & Depiction’
Perhaps the surest proof of Winston Churchill’s theorem that “history is written by the victors” comes from none other than Adolf Hitler: “Who, after all, speaks today of the annihilation of the Armenians?” the German Fuhrer said by way of a chilling corollary, effectively paving the way for the most insidious ethnic cleansing of the modern era. Between 1915 and 1918, an estimated 1.5 million Armenians living in Ottoman Turkey had been rounded up and either marched to their deaths or murdered outright.

But “history” — as in the public study of past events, and the way they are positioned and discussed by society at large — has been ambiguous about the Armenian Genocide. Even that label is a point of contention among contemporary Turks, who resist the “G word” (coined in 1944 by Polish lawyer Raphael Lemkin to describe Germany’s systematic murder of Jewish citizens) as a legal definition that, they say, should not retroactively
See full article at Variety - Film News »

New York Film Festival’s 55th Edition Hopes to Make a Strong Case for Cinema

New York Film Festival’s 55th Edition Hopes to Make a Strong Case for Cinema
For an event that doesn’t hand out prizes, host swag suites or foster an acquisitions market, the New York Film Festival remains a remarkably essential event on the movie calendar.

More than half a century after its debut, it serves as a cinephile’s cauldron of competing ideologies, storytelling traditions and global perspectives, unspooling against the high-art backdrop of Lincoln Center. One more reason it remains especially relevant in industry circles: It is timed to the start of Oscar campaign season.

This year’s 55th edition, which runs Sept. 28 to Oct. 15, promises to also be something of a referendum on the nature of cinema, capping off a year of vigorous debate about that topic. From Cannes to SXSW, festivals of all sizes and missions have been grappling with the flow of filmmakers, talent and creative capital from independent film to the episodic realm.

Are series created for such streaming services as Netflix, Amazon
See full article at Variety - Film News »

15 Under-the-Radar Highlights at the 55th New York Film Festival

Considering the esteemed level of curation at the New York Film Festival, which begins this Thursday at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, a comprehensive preview could mostly consist of the schedule.

There’s the gala slots (Last Flag Flying, Wonderstruck, and Wonder Wheel), Main Slate selections (featuring Call Me By Your Name, Lady Bird, The Square, Mudbound), two films from Film Twitter phenom Hong Sang-soo, and much more, as well as a 24-film Robert Mitchum retrospective and a delectable line-up of restorations.

So rather than single all of these out for our yearly preview, we’re looking at a handful of under-the-radar highlights from across the festival. Check them out below and return for our coverage.

Before We Vanish (Kiyoshi Kurosawa)

There are few directors who would choose to take a semi-sincere approach to a lengthy pseudo-philosophical science-fiction film — especially not one that lightly pries into our fundamental psychological
See full article at The Film Stage »

Bob Dylan, Steven Spielberg Documentaries to Premiere at New York Film Festival

Bob Dylan, Steven Spielberg Documentaries to Premiere at New York Film Festival
New documentaries about Bob Dylan and Steven Spielberg are among the slate of films that will premiere during the New York Film Festival, which begins in late September.

The hour-long Trouble No More constitutes lost footage from Dylan's 1979/80 tour during his "born again" phase, with the singer performing in Buffalo and Toronto with an esteemed backing band in support of his Slow Train Coming.

Directed by Jennifer Lebeau, Trouble No More's uncovered footage has all been newly restored, with Luc Sarte-penned sermons read by actor Michael Shannon interspersed throughout the live video.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Kate Winslet, Steven Spielberg, Bob Dylan Added to New York Film Festival Lineup

Kate Winslet, Steven Spielberg, Bob Dylan Added to New York Film Festival Lineup
The 2017 New York Film Festival has added a conversation with Kate Winslet, documentaries about Steven Spielberg and Bob Dylan and four new films by “Shoah” director Claude Lanzmann, the Film Society of Lincoln Center announced on Monday. The programs will take place during the 55th annual Nyff, which will kick off on September 28 and run through October 15 in New York City. Winslet will do an onstage Q&A dealing with her career and her performance in Woody Allen’s “Wonder Wheel,” which will close the festival. That film’s cinematographer, Vittorio Storaro, will also do a “Master Class” in collaboration with.
See full article at The Wrap »

Steven Spielberg, Bob Dylan Documentaries Join New York Film Festival Lineup

Steven Spielberg, Bob Dylan Documentaries Join New York Film Festival Lineup
The 2017 New York Film Festival has lined up a roster of special events that includes world premiere screenings of documentaries about Steven Spielberg and Bob Dylan, as well as a conversation with Kate Winslet and a work-in-progress screening of Bruce Weber’s portrait of Robert Mitchum.

New York Film Festival 2017 Slate Announced (Full List)

Susan Lacy’s “Spielberg” traces the filmmaker’s personal and professional life from childhood to “Jaws” to DreamWorks to now, with interviews with fellow film directors (Francis Ford Coppola, George Lucas) and regular collaborators (Tom Hanks, John Williams). The movie is part of a NYFF lineup of special-event films that also includes Jennifer Lebeau’s “Trouble No More,” featuring concert footage from Dylan’s” “born again” period in the late 70s and early 80s; “The Opera House,” Susan Froemke’s movie about the Metropolitan Opera; and “Nice Girls Don’t Stay for Breakfast,” Weber’s in-the-works documentary about Mitchum, built
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Nyff Adds Special Events, Including Steven Spielberg Documentary, Master Class With Ed Lachman and Vittorio Storaro, and More

Nyff Adds Special Events, Including Steven Spielberg Documentary, Master Class With Ed Lachman and Vittorio Storaro, and More
This year’s New York Film Festival has just unveiled a slew of Special Events to round out its already full-to-bursting lineup, and it includes some late-breaking entries to previously announced sections and a selection of brand new events that are very special indeed. Highlights include a trio of documentary premieres, including Susan Lacy’s “Spielberg” (focused on the eponymous director, with both Lacy and her subject set to appear at the festival), along with Jennifer Lebeau’s Bob Dylan concert film “Trouble No More,” and Susan Froemke’s “The Opera House,” a history of the Metropolitan Opera and a love letter to the art form that will (appropriately enough) screen at the Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center.

Other standouts include four brand-new films from Claude Lanzmann, a sparkling new restoration of G.W. Pabst’s “Pandora’s Box.” Elsewhere, Kate Winslet will be on hand for a career-spanning chat
See full article at Indiewire »

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers
Any list of the greatest foreign directors currently working today has to include Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. The directors first rose to prominence in the mid 1990s with efforts like “The Promise” and “Rosetta,” and they’ve continued to excel in the 21st century with titles such as “The Kid With A Bike” and “Two Days One Night,” which earned Marion Cotillard a Best Actress Oscar nomination.

Read MoreThe Dardenne Brothers’ Next Film Will Be a Terrorism Drama

The directors will be back in U.S. theaters with the release of “The Unknown Girl” on September 8, which is a long time coming considering the film first premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016. While you continue to wait for their new movie, the brothers have provided their definitive list of 79 movies from the 20th century that you must see. La Cinetek published the list in full and is hosting many
See full article at Indiewire »

Destination Unknown Review

Author: Linda Marric

Baring witness to some of the most atrocious events in the history of humanity, 12 Holocaust survivors, mostly in their eighties and nineties, share some of their most harrowing experiences in Claire Ferguson’s hugely affecting documentary feature Destination Unknown. Using unique and intimate testimonies, the film manages to approach this delicate subject in the most respectful and truthful fashion by allowing only those who went through this ordeal to be heard. Ferguson attempts to retrace these brave survivors’ journeys from the outbreak of war, to the misery of the ghettos, all the way through to the unimaginable horrors of the death camps where millions of innocent people perished in the gas chambers or from starvation and disease.

Amongst the survivors being interviewed are those who lost every member of their families in the camps, and those who were lucky enough to be saved by Oskar Schindler, like Mietek Pemper,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Cannes 2017. A Cold War Affair—Claude Lanzmann's "Napalm"

Claude Lanzmann is best known for turning the camera on Holocaust criminals and survivors in his landmark documentary Shoah and its feature film offshoots like 2013’s tremendously powerful The Last of the Unjust, but in his new documentary Napalm this master of recording human memory turns the camera on himself.Based a story in the French director’s book The Patagonian Hare, Napalm’s centerpiece is a long recounting to the camera by the 91-year-old Lanzmann of his trip to North Korea as part of an international delegation in 1958. During this long visit, he met a beautiful nurse that didn’t speak his language, yet with whom Lanzmann nevertheless embarked upon an almost unbelievably remarkable day of courtship, political fear, exotic fascination and personal desire. It is no wonder this experience so stuck to his mind. Lanzmann returned to North Korea nearly 50 years later first in 2004 and then in 2015, and
See full article at MUBI »

Why I bluffed my way into North Korea: Claude Lanzmann on his Pyongyang lover

He said he was making a film about taekwondo. But the great French director was actually on the trail of an old flame he had a secret romance with in the 1950s

At 91, Claude Lanzmann is a virtual folk memory of cinema. He is the former teenage fighter in the French resistance whose Jewish family went into hiding when war broke out. In 1985, he directed Shoah, the eight-hour documentary about the Holocaust composed almost entirely of first-person testimony. Now in Cannes, he has premiered a film about his personal experiences in North Korea. Napalm is a movie that, initially, takes its cue from the underreported fact that the Us used the incendiary weapon in the Korean war of 1950-53.

Related: Napalm review – Claude Lanzmann's gripping account of erotic encounter in North Korea

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'Napalm': Film Review | Cannes 2017

'Napalm': Film Review | Cannes 2017
At 91 years and counting, venerable documentary filmmaker Claude Lanzmann still has it in him to both inform and go against convention. The creator of the monumental Shoah, as well as several other works on the Holocaust, turns his camera this time on North Korea – a place that few directors have ever ventured into.

What he pulls from it is Napalm, an almost short film by Lanzmann standards (it clocks in at 100 minutes), but one that offers up a very different take on a place that has been on much of the world’s s—t list for as long...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Cannes is Coming — 1st of 3

Cannes is Coming — 1st of 3
A heightened sense of anticipation pervades the days leading up to the 70th anniversary of Cannes Film Festival as we arrange screenings and parties and meetings for an adrenaline filled ten days. May 17 to 28 will be full of surprises as this unique high energy mix of glamour, work, fun and stress unfolds. A broad range of distinctive films in Competition, Un Certain Regard, Directors Fortnight (Quainzaine des realisateurs) and Critics Week (La Semaine de la critique), L’Acid compete with parties from cocktails sponsored by all the countries that are here (60+ including Armenia, Nigeria, Kazakhstan and Singapore) and with late night extravanzas on yachts and at villas in the hills.Claudia Dances! Claudia Laughs! Claudia Lives!

This year’s poster portrays Claudia Cardinale dancing on a fiery red background. The Italian actress moved to Paris a long time ago. As the Cannes Muse this year, her musings illuminate the terrific
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

What Movies Are Critics Most Excited to See at Cannes 2017? — Critics Survey

What Movies Are Critics Most Excited to See at Cannes 2017? — Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

The lineup for Cannes 2017 has finally been announced, and it’s a doozy. From the inevitable return of Michael Haneke to the shocking inclusion of television (albeit television from celebrated Cannes alumni David Lynch and Jane Campion), the 70th edition of the world’s most prestigious film festival promises to have something for everyone.

We asked our panel of critics to name the Cannes premiere they’re most excited to see, and their answers were unsurprisingly all over the map.

April Wolfe (@awolfeful), La Weekly

Lynne Ramsay’s “You Were Never Really Here.”

My stomach knots are finally unraveling knowing that Ramsay’s about to unleash another
See full article at Indiewire »

Espn’s ‘O.J.: Made in America’ Goes Long as Unconventional Oscar Frontrunner

Espn’s ‘O.J.: Made in America’ Goes Long as Unconventional Oscar Frontrunner
The Oscar best documentary feature nominee “O.J.: Made in America” is a staggering achievement, a film magisterial in its scope, riveting in its detail. It lets you feel like you’ve finally taken the full haunting measure of the O.J. Simpson saga — cultural, biographical, sociological, legal, forensic. Yet it still seems fair to ask: Why has Ezra Edelman’s five-part epic swept the year-end film critics’ awards, and why is it now the frontrunner to win the Oscar for best documentary? The movie, which is seven hours and 47 minutes long, was first presented as part of Espn’s “30 for 30” series, (and it now has the distinction of being the longest film ever nominated for an Academy Award). It was conceived, and made, to be shown on television.

That may sound like a quibble. “O.J.: Made in America” has been racking up film honors, and is now in the thick of the Academy Awards race,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Release of 'This Is Our Land' to go ahead despite Front National protests

Politics drama that upset France’s Front National party to market premiere at Rendez-vous with French cinema.

The French release of Lucas Belvaux’s populist politics drama This Is Our Land (Chez Nous) will go ahead as planned in February and without cuts in the face of fierce criticism from France’s far-right Front National (Fn) party, distributor Jean Labadie of Paris-based Le Pacte has vowed.

The Belgian director’s film has been in the eye of a political storm this week following the release of the first trailer on Dec 30, ahead of its scheduled Feb 22 release.

Le Pacte’s international sales team will hold buyers-only screening at Unifrance’s Rendez-vous with French Cinema in Paris next week. It will get its festival world premiere at the International Film Festival Rotterdam at the end of this month.

“The film will be released in February as planned and in its current form. There will be
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Tiff 2016. Wavelengths Shorts

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Há Terra!I want to apologize for providing this Wavelengths avant-garde preview a little later than I might've liked. Hell, given that it's been over a week since movies died, I'm not exactly sure how much more kindling I can chuck onto the pyre. But I should remark that compared with previous years' iterations of the Tiff Wavelengths series, 2016 does feel a bit...off. I'm chiefly referring to the experimental short films here. (My second part, addressing the Wavelengths features, will be along in a matter of days.) Make no mistake. There's plenty of great work in this year's programs. But I do feel that the disparity this year between the truly exceptional films and the mediocre-to-not-very-good ones is markedly high.I enjoy films, and more than this, I enjoy enjoying them. I hardly get my kicks by being a nattering nabob of negativity. But programmers have to work with what is available to them,
See full article at MUBI »

Son Of Saul: the horrors of the Holocaust, portrayed with a rare honesty

László Nemes’s debut meant tackling the ultimate cinematic conundrum: to look, or not to look?

Related: Son of Saul reviewed – the Dailies film podcast

The Holocaust has been an ethical and cinematic conundrum for film-makers almost since the camps were liberated 70 years ago. Jean-Luc Godard has often said that the absence of footage of the gas chambers in action marks a signal failure of the 20th century’s signature art form to illuminate the 20th century’s greatest atrocity. Conversely, Claude Lanzmann, who spent decades making Shoah and the ancillary documentaries that have followed it, not only refused for years to countenance the representation of the Holocaust in fictional films (by any film-maker), but even declined to use historical footage in his own work. Instead, he hit the issue literally where it lived: in the memories of its survivors and perpetrators.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

All the Awesome Movies Hitting HBO Now in May

If you've watched everything on your list from HBO Now's April releases, it's time to start thinking about May! The Man From U.N.C.L.E. and The Intern are just a couple of the new releases hitting the streaming platform next month. Come on, you can tear yourself away from Game of Thrones for two hours to watch Snakes on a Plane. Take a look at everything that's coming to (and disappearing from!) HBO Now and HBO Go in May. Theatrical premieres: May 1: Lost River May 1: The Man From U.N.C.L.E. May 1: Mistress America May 7: Fantastic Four May 10: Jupiter Ascending May 14: Pan May 28: The Intern Original programming highlights: May 2: Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah May 21: All the Way Other notable movies starting May 1: 27 Dresses The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas Face/Off The
See full article at BuzzSugar »
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