An Early Frost (1985) - News Poster

(1985 TV Movie)

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10 Shows That Changed Critics’ Perceptions of the World — IndieWire Survey

10 Shows That Changed Critics’ Perceptions of the World — IndieWire Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What TV show that has changed your perspective on something? How? Why?

Sonia Saraiya (@soniasaraiya), Variety

This is almost cliché given how much we all wrote about it — but “You’re the Worst” really did alter the way that I thought about and understood clinical depression. I think the power that television and storytelling, in general, has to change our perspectives and/or broaden our horizons about experiences that aren’t our own is its most powerful force, and I could point to any number of shows that have slowly and gradually opened up new realizations for me. With “You’re the Worst” it felt like
See full article at Indiewire »

Links: Adele, Oscar, Regina, Rooney, JLaw and Wtf Missy

Film Comment Nick Davis interviews Todd Haynes on movies that inspired something in his movies

Interview Mag talks to Regina King about her big year, an Emmy win and The Leftovers

Kenneth in the (212) looks back on the revolutionary TV movie An Early Frost (starring Aidan Quinn & Gena Rowlands) for its 30th anniversary

The Film Stage a prologue comic for The Hateful Eight written by Quentin Tarantino himself

The Envelope Jacob Tremblay on how Room should have ended

filmmixtape suggests 10 films that should have made WGA's "Funniest" List

Pajiba mourns the passing of Hayley Atwell... from social media. She was a master at it. *sniffle*

This is Not Porn Marlon Brando on the set of Julius Caesar

Gurus of Gold new charts and which films and performance need a bigger campaign push to be a nomination threat

Screen Daily Adele in talks to join the cast of the next Xavier Dolan movie.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Handprint-and-Footprint Ceremony: Gena Rowlands

Handprint-and-Footprint Ceremony: Gena Rowlands
Looking ahead to her Handprint and Footprint Ceremony at the Tcl Chinese Theatre frontcourt, Gena Rowlands quips, “I just hope I can pull myself out of the cement.”

But recent co-star Frank Langella (“Parts Per Billion”) warns, “She’s tough, you know. That cement will have met its match.”

Rowlands has never shied from getting her hands dirty. Few actresses have been as formidable, or as durable, and none is better known for anatomizing mental breakdown’s terror.

See Also: ‘Old Player’ Gena Rowlands Still Going Strong

As an indie pioneer, she may seem an unlikely candidate for the high-Hollywood rite of preserving prints in concrete. But her 10-film collaboration with late husband John Cassavetes, which included such groundbreaking psychodramas as “Faces,” is only part of a 50-year saga involving every entertainment medium, from tiny-budget to megafeature.

Surrounded by countless statuettes, honors and memorabilia in the Hollywood Hills manse where many Cassavetes pics were shot,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gena Rowlands At "A Woman Under The Influence" Screening, L.A. May 28

  • CinemaRetro
A Woman Under The Influence 40th Anniversary Screening In Los Angeles

By Todd Garbarini

Probably the best known film of the late film director John Cassavetes’ career, A Woman Under the Influence (1974) is celebrating its 40th anniversary with a screening at the Landmark Theatre at 10850 West Pico Blvd. in Los Angeles, CA 90064 on Wednesday, May28th at 7:00 pm. The film’s star, actress Gena Rowlands, is scheduled to appear in person.

From the press release:

In Person!

An Evening with

Star Gena Rowlands!

Director John Cassavetes'

A Woman Under the Influence (1974)

40th Anniversary!

Wednesday, May 28 at 7:00pm

at The Landmark

A Woman Under the Influence received two Oscar© nominations in 1974—best actress Gena Rowlands and best director John Cassavetes. The film tells the story of a wife and mother whose unstable behavior leads her husband (Peter Falk) to commit her to a mental institution. At the time of its release,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Briefs: “The Walking Dead” Devours Sochi, Michael Sam Updates, And Nick Zano Gives Us “One Big Happy”

Adam Lambert at the Family Equality Council’s Annual Los Angeles Awards Dinner. A taste of what to expect from this week’s Hump Day.

Birthday shoutouts go to Laura Dern, who is 47, Elizabeth Banks is 40, Emma Roberts is 23, and Roberta Flack is 77. Here’s my favorite underrated and sadly lost Roberta song. It peaked at #58 in February 1984.

The Walking Dead returned to record ratings last night, easily outpacing Sochi in the demo.

Best Buds Derek Hough and Mark Ballas buy bachelor pad together. Bless their hearts.

Will Michael Sam Save the NFL From Its Homophobia?

How will news that Michael Sam is gay affect his NFL draft stock? Ugh. At least these Tweets are more supportive.

Congratulations on leading the way, @MikeSamFootball. That's real sportsmanship.

Barack Obama (@BarackObama) February 10, 2014

You're an inspiration to all of us, @MikeSamFootball. We couldn't be prouder of your courage both on and off the field.
See full article at The Backlot »

In Bloom | Review

An Early Frost: Ekvtimishvili & Grob’s Debut a Memoir in Neorealism

The Georgian entry for 2014’s Best Foreign Language Film, In Bloom is the directorial debut of Nana Ekvtimishvili and Simon Grob, and is based on the former’s memories of childhood while growing up in 1992 war-torn Georgia. Previously, they made the 2007 film Fata Morgana together (yes, which shares the same name with the famed Herzog documentary), directed by Grob and written by Ekvtimishvili. Whilst set in a notably violent period in the country after its separation from the Soviet Union, leading to an unrest that sparked a three year civil war, it seems the bubble of the adolescent realm seems to supersede all even in the worst of times. But for young girls on the cusp of developing into well-adjusted young women amidst such tumultuous times seems next to impossible, female agency dashed upon the rocks of a
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

TheBacklot 40: Influential Gay Men in Television

Here at TheBacklot.com we spend a lot of time celebrating gay and bi men in the spotlight: actors, singers, dancers, sportsmen, and personalities are splashed across our pages like so much red paint at an all-fur fashion show. While we will never tire of the Neil Patrick Harrises and Chris Colfers of the world, we thought it was high time we paid due credit to some of the more unsung gay heroes: the guys behind the cameras of some of television’s best shows. In that light, we are proud to unveil TheBacklot 40, our celebration of 40 of the hardest-working and most influential out men working behind the scenes in TV.

These are the men who create and run some of our favorite shows, have written some of our most beloved gay characters, and have shepherded gay-inclusive stories to screen long before it was fashionable. Some will be familiar, but
See full article at The Backlot »

Whitney Houston, Jennie Rivera and more of 2012's Gone but Not Forgotten

As a new year dawns, a tribute to those we've lost in the year now ending is merited ... and in 2012, those sad milestones have encompassed some of the most popular personalities in television history.

Andy Griffith: The actor-producer who put Mayberry on the map forever will be remembered as one of television's most genial personalities, also extending to his run as wily lawyer Matlock.

Dick Clark: The number of music stars who owe at least part of their success to the "American Bandstand" maestro is incalculable. Thanks to him, people also enjoy "New Year's Rockin' Eve," receive American Music Awards and have a greater appreciation of bloopers. Here's a "so long" salute to you, Dick.

Larry Hagman: The truly unfortunate irony of the veteran actor's recent death is that he was just starting his second round of "Dallas" success as master schemer J.R. Ewing. He'll also
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Ben Gazzara obituary

Forceful actor who built a 60-year career in the Us and Europe

Few screen debuts have equalled the searing malevolence of Ben Gazzara's Iago-inspired Jocko De Paris in The Strange One (1957). The role, which he had created on stage, became forever associated with this intense graduate of New York's method school of acting.

Gazzara, who has died aged 81 of pancreatic cancer, continued his stage career in modern classics including Epitaph for George Dillon and as the humiliated and vengeful George in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? He also achieved popular acclaim through television series – notably Run for Your Life (1965-68) – and in movies for his friend John Cassavetes and other directors including Otto Preminger, Peter Bogdanovich, David Mamet, Todd Solondz and the Coen brothers.

Gazzara was born to Sicilian immigrants and grew up on Manhattan's lower east side. He began acting at the Madison Square Boys Club and
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Ben Gazzara, 1930 - 2012

  • MUBI
"A New York native of Sicilian heritage, Ben Gazzara was a strongly masculine, subtly menacing screen presence with a gravelly voice that one writer described as 'saloon-cured' and another said could strip paint at 50 paces," writes Dennis McLellan in the Los Angeles Times. "The veteran actor, who died Friday in New York City, found fame on Broadway in the 1950s, starred in the TV series Run for Your Life in the 1960s and was closely identified on the big screen with independent filmmaker John Cassavetes."

In Cassavetes's Husbands (1970), The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (1976) and Opening Night (1976), "he plays varieties of himself, as Cassavetes saw him: the moderate man who loses his head and takes immoderate action," blogs the New Yorker's Richard Brody. "Husbands, in particular, finds Gazzara accomplishing one of the most astonishing, and moving, feats ever filmed: he steals a movie from Cassavetes and Peter Falk…. The movies
See full article at MUBI »

Remember Me: Ben Gazzara

Ben Gazzara died on February 3 of pancreatic cancer. An alumnus of the famed Actors’ Studio, he had a long career on stage, TV, and film. Not just long, but accomplished.

On Broadway, he was the original Brick in the Tennessee Williams’ classic, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and then he eclipsed that triumph with another powerful stage performance as a junkie whose habit poisons his relationship with everyone who loves him in A Hat Full of Rain.

His TV career launched in the early 1950s and extended through the next five decades. His small screen credits included roles on the landmark live drama anthologies of the 50s, such as The United States Steel Hour, Kraft Theatre, and Playhouse 90, and such acclaimed productions as cop drama A Question of Honor (1982), one of network TV’s first attempts to address the then detonating AIDS epidemic in An Early Frost (1985), and the epic mini-series,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Ben Gazzara obituary

Prolific actor who built a 60-year career in the Us and Europe

Few screen debuts have equalled the searing malevolence of Ben Gazzara's Iago-inspired Jocko De Paris in The Strange One (1957). The role, which he had created on stage, became forever associated with this intense graduate of New York's method school of acting.

Gazzara, who has died aged 81 of pancreatic cancer, continued his stage career in modern classics including Epitaph for George Dillon and as the humiliated and vengeful George in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1976). He also achieved popular acclaim through television series – notably Run for Your Life (1965-68) – and in movies for his friend John Cassavetes and other directors including Otto Preminger, Peter Bogdanovich, David Mamet, Todd Solondz and the Coen brothers.

Gazzara was born to Sicilian immigrants and grew up on Manhattan's lower east side. He began acting at the Madison Square Boys Club and
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

R.I.P. Ben Gazzara (1930 - 2012)

Ben Gazzara, the veteran actor of the stage and screen, has passed away on Friday at the age of 81 after battling pancreatic cancer. Born in New York City in 1930, Gazzara studied acting at the Dramatic Workshop in New York before joining the celebrated Actors Studio and began his career with a number of acclaimed Broadway roles during the 1950s, gaining the first of three Tony Award nominations in 1956 for his work in A Hatful of Rain. He made his feature film debut alongside fellow Actors Studio alumni such as George Peppard and Pat Hingle in 1957's The Strange One, before gaining his breakthrough role in Otto Preminger's 1959 courtroom drama Anatomy of a Murder.

During the 1960s, Gazzara enjoyed a successful run in the television series Run for Your Life, receiving three Golden Globe nominations for Best TV Star - Male and two Emmy nominations for Actor in Leading Role
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Ben Gazzara dies aged 81

Emmy-winning stage, film and television actor was known for intense countenance that won him tough-guy roles

Ben Gazzara obituary

The actor Ben Gazzara, known for his brooding tough-guy presence in dozens of films, television shows and stage productions over his long career, died of pancreatic cancer on Friday at a Manhattan hospital, his lawyer said. He was 81.

The New York-born performer died at Bellevue hospital centre with members of his family at his side, according to his attorney, Jay Julien.

Born Biagio Anthony Gazzara to Italian immigrant parents, he began his career in live theatre, most notably with the role of Brick in the original Broadway production of Tennessee Williams's Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, directed by Elia Kazan. The role was played by Paul Newman in the 1958 film version.

A three-time Tony award nominee for his stage work, Gazzara made his film debut as a sociopathic military
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Ben Gazzara dies aged 81

Emmy-winning stage, film and television actor was known for intense countenance that won him tough-guy roles

Ben Gazzara obituary

The actor Ben Gazzara, known for his brooding tough-guy presence in dozens of films, television shows and stage productions over his long career, died of pancreatic cancer on Friday at a Manhattan hospital, his lawyer said. He was 81.

The New York-born performer died at Bellevue hospital centre with members of his family at his side, according to his attorney, Jay Julien.

Born Biagio Anthony Gazzara to Italian immigrant parents, he began his career in live theatre, most notably with the role of Brick in the original Broadway production of Tennessee Williams's Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, directed by Elia Kazan. The role was played by Paul Newman in the 1958 film version.

A three-time Tony award nominee for his stage work, Gazzara made his film debut as a sociopathic military
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ben Gazzara Dead: Actor Dies At 81

  • Moviefone
Ben Gazzara, star of "Anatomy of a Murder" and "The Killing of a Chinese Bookie" has died at age 81. The actor, who was a favorite of director John Cassavetes, died of pancreatic cancer at Bellevue Hospital Center, his lawyer, Jay Julien, told the New York Times. He was a contemporary of higher-profile stars Marlon Brando and Rod Steiger and also studied at the famed Actors Studio in Manhattan. He conquered Broadway, originating the role of Brick in "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof," but didn't capitalize on his rising star when Hollywood came calling. "When I became hot, so to speak, in the theater, I got a lot of offers,” he told Charlie Rose in a 1998 interview. “I won't tell you the pictures I turned down because you would say, ‘You are a fool.' And I was a fool.” Gazzara still managed to make an indelible mark on the movies,
See full article at Moviefone »

Ben Gazzara: Cat On A Hot Tin Roof, The Strange One, They All Laughed

Audrey Hepburn, Ben Gazzara, They All Laughed Ben Gazzara Dead Pt.1: Anatomy Of A Murder, Husbands, An Early Frost Long before An Early Frost, Ben Gazzara had already appeared in two (however veiled) gay-themed productions. On Broadway, he was the virile ex-football player pining for his "best friend" while ignoring wife Barbara Bel Geddes in the 1955 original staging of Tennessee Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. (Paul Newman and Elizabeth Taylor played those two roles in the bowdlerized 1958 movie version directed by Richard Brooks.) And in 1957, Gazzara made his film debut as a sexually troubled military man who gets off by viciously abusing (or watching others viciously abuse) his fellow cadets in Jack Garfein's The Strange One. Among Gazzara's other 75 or so feature films — many of which were made in Italy — are Steve Carver's Capone (1975), in the title role; Stuart Rosenberg's Voyage of the Damned
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Ben Gazzara Dead at 81: Anatomy Of A Murder, Husbands, An Early Frost

Ben Gazzara, who was featured on Broadway in the original Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and in movies by the likes of John Cassavetes, Otto Preminger, and Peter Bogdanovich, died earlier today at Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital Center as per the New York Times. Gazzara, who had been suffering from pancreatic cancer, was 81. Although Gazzara (the son of Italian immigrants, born Aug. 28, 1930, in New York City) is probably best remembered for his films directed by Cassavetes — Husbands (1970), The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (1976), and Opening Night (1978) — he was remarkably effective elsewhere. Arguably, much more effective elsewhere. Gazzara delivered a first-rate performance in Otto Preminger's cynical look at the American justice system, Anatomy of a Murder (1959), in which he played a military man on trial for killing a man — he claims — was attempting to rape his wife (Lee Remick, replacing Lana Turner). James Stewart is his somewhat shady defense attorney,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Angelina Jolie’s Bosnian Film Picked Up by FilmDistrict

The anticipated Angelina Jolie’s directorial debut film has a U.S. distributor and a name. Her Bosnian War film “In the Land of Blood and Honey” was acquired by FilmDistrict, a subsidiary of Gk Films. Gk Films found Graham King stated that Jolie’s debut “signals the arrival of a visceral and compelling storyteller. Here is the official synopsis: ‘In the Land of Blood and Honey’ is a love story about a young Serb and a Muslim woman who fell in love several evenings before beginning of war in Bosnia. The action follows war events with the young Muslim woman ending up in a Serbian concentration camp from where she is somehow saved by the young Serb. Their love becomes passionate but impossible. The film stars Rade Serbedzija (“Batman Begins,” “Snatch”), Branko Djuric (“Cat Run,” “The Bright Side of the Moon”) and Nikola Djuricko (“The Woman with a Broken Nose,
See full article at LRM Online »

TCA Liveblog: "The Event," "Undercovers," "Law & Order: Los Angeles," "Facing Kate," Outlaw," and "Chase"

3:30 p.m. Chase

In the new action show about U.S. Marshalls, Kelli Giddish plays Annie Frost, a Texan with a talent for chasing down the best of criminals. Giddish's co-star is someone we know well: Rose Rollins.

Rose said she plays "Daisy, aka Hurricane. I balance out the Chatterbox over here, which is Marco, because I am a woman of few words. I am the tactical specialist. I come from a tight knit family, second generation Nigerian."

And it's true — in the pilot, even when Rose is on screen, she's not saying much. But I feel like her role will grow as the show goes on and establishes itself. Also Executive Producer Jennifer Johnson says we'll see a friendship unfold between Annie and Lucy and "learn a secret" about Annie.

I asked Rose if she knows her character's romantic situation and she said there hasn't been any development
See full article at AfterEllen.com »
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