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20 Little-Known Facts About Anastasia on the Movie's 20th Anniversary

Image Source: Everett Collection If you grew up in the '90s, there's a good chance Anastasia is one of your favorite animated movies. It might not be a product of the Mouse House, but Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna of Russia might as well be up there with iconic Disney princesses like Cinderella, Belle, and Ariel. In honor of the feel-good movie's 20th anniversary - it first hit theaters on Nov. 21, 1997 - let's take a look at a few little-known facts that might surprise even the most diehard Dimitri fans. RelatedPrepare to Sing Along Embarrassingly Loud to the Anastasia Musical's "Journey to the Past" So, like we said, it isn't a Disney movie. Although the animation is reminiscent of Disney favorites like The Little Mermaid and Aladdin, Anastasia actually hails from 20th Century Fox. With Disney in the running to buy part of Fox, however, she might end up a
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Justice League, Batman's Knightmare & the future of the Dceu

Mark Harrison Nov 21, 2017

A spoiler-y look at Batman Vs Superman, Justice League, and Batman's 'Knightmare'...

This article contains spoilers for Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice and Justice League.

One of the most surreal and oft-discussed scenes in Zack Snyder's Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice comes around an hour into the film, when Bruce Wayne nods off at his desk in the Batcave. The five minute sequence that follows, dubbed 'the Knightmare' (but not the Citv gameshow), is the sum of all Bruce's fears about Superman, showing a dystopian future that could have foreshadowed the future of the DC cinematic universe.

However, these plans have been significantly changed over the course of the 20 months between the release of Batman V Superman and its follow-up, Justice League, by a combination of the vitriolic reception of the former, a frantic course correction on the latter and the real life
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Coco’: Why Pixar’s Unifying Día de los Muertos Drama Is Animation Oscar Frontrunner

  • Indiewire
‘Coco’: Why Pixar’s Unifying Día de los Muertos Drama Is Animation Oscar Frontrunner
At a time when we need bridges instead of walls, Pixar’s “Coco” offers the best possible unification for our country, with its beautiful, musical, and heartfelt ode to Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead), and will be hard to beat for the Oscar.

But above and beyond its authentic cultural trappings and fresh twist on a “Back to the Future”-like buddy comedy, “Coco” is a wondrous celebration of family and remembrance, featuring an all-Latino cast that includes “Mozart in the Jungle’s” Gael Garcia Bernal, Benjamin Bratt, Renée Victor, and newcomer Anthony Gonzalez.

Continuing a recent Pixar trend devoted to mid-life crisis stories, “Coco” concerns 12-year-old Miguel (Gonzalez), an aspiring guitarist from a rural Mexican town, whose family of shoemakers has banned music. After borrowing the skeleton guitar of his great-great grandfather and musical icon, Ernesto de la Cruz (Bratt), Miguel gets transported to the Land of the Dead
See full article at Indiewire »

Drool Over Legendary Poster Artist Drew Struzan’s Frankenstein and Bride of Frankenstein Art

We belong… dead. At MondoCon earlier this month, Drew Struzan – the man responsible for a handful of the most iconic movie posters of all time, including Star Wars, Back to the Future and Indiana Jones – was on hand offering up limited edition prints of his takes on Frankenstein’s monster and the so-called Bride of Frankenstein. Earlier today, Mondo put the […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

Mr. Robot Recap: Stage 2, Take 2

Mr. Robot Recap: Stage 2, Take 2
Elliot has a plan to thwart the Dark Army’s deadly plot this week on Mr. Robot — but is he already a few steps behind?

We pick up with Elliot confronting Angela about working with the Dark Army. She urges him to “let today happen,” convinced that Whiterose “is going to save the world.” Elliot says that’s all lies, calling Whiterose a terrorist, but Angela insists no one will die, “including your father and my mother.” (Again with the cryptic promises.) He gives up on her and rushes over to the E Corp data recovery building, where he hopes
See full article at TVLine.com »

Exclusive Interview: Ana Lily Amirpour on The Bad Batch and working on Legion season 2

Rafael Motamayor chats with director Ana Lily Amirpour

Flickering Myth had the pleasure of asking the director of The Bad Batch, Ana Lily Amirpour about visual storytelling, having her movie on Netflix and directing an episode of Legion.

The Bad Batch is a very visual movie with not that much dialogue, how do you craft a story like that?

I am hard of hearing, I am 30% deaf actually. I was born that way so I’ve always been interested in feeling what I’m seeing if you know what I mean. I’ve always relied on visual stimulation and I don’t listen to conversation. So in the movie, there’s a lot that happens without words, and I guess it makes people uncomfortable if nobody is talking.

How do you use genre to tell a story? Specially westerns in your two feature films.

I just like cinema that makes you read the real world.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Kathleen Kennedy to Receive Top Honor at the 2018 Art Directors Guild Awards

Kennedy: Star Wars/YouTube

Kathleen Kennedy will take home the top prize at the 22nd annual Art Directors Guild (Adg) Awards. The Lucasfilm president and “Star Wars” producer will receive the Cinematic Imagery Award, an honor given to “those whose body of work in the film industry has richly enhanced the visual aspects of the moviegoing experience,” Deadline reports. The Adg will present the accolade to Kennedy at the awards ceremony on January 27.

“Harry Potter” author J.K. Rowling and set decorator Stephenie McMillan are the only women who have received the Cinematic Imagery Award before. Rowling and McMillan shared the honor with the rest of the “Harry Potter” franchise’s creative team in 2011.

“We are thrilled to recognize the amazing contributions Kathleen Kennedy has made to narrative design for more than three decades, while so beautifully creating a cinematic legacy as represented by some of the most successful movies of our time,
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

‘Stranger Things’ Season 3: What to Fix When the Show Returns to Hawkins

  • Indiewire Television
‘Stranger Things’ Season 3: What to Fix When the Show Returns to Hawkins
The Duffer Brothers brought a bigger, cinematic feeling to “Stranger Things” in its second season, but that also meant that some characters were given the short shrift when it came to meaty storylines and development. While Steve (Joe Keery) became the unlikely hero of the new season and Dustin (Gaten Matarazzo) became the standout among the boys, the rest were less defined. Fortunately, the Duffers told IndieWire that they were already planning on focusing on more character-based stories in Season 3. Below are a few suggestions for what we’d like to see when the show returns to Hawkins, Indiana.

[Editor’s Note: The following article contains spoilers for “Stranger Things 2.”]

Read More:‘Stranger Things’ Season 3: The Duffer Brothers Promise ‘Weirder,’ More Character-Centric Stories Keep the Obscure Soundtracks Coming

Not sure if you’re aware, but the television show “Stranger Things” takes place in the 1980s. In case you were ever unsure of the time period, there are plenty of songs to help remind you.
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Stranger Things’ Season 3: What to Fix When the Show Returns to Hawkins

  • Indiewire
‘Stranger Things’ Season 3: What to Fix When the Show Returns to Hawkins
The Duffer Brothers brought a bigger, cinematic feeling to “Stranger Things” in its second season, but that also meant that some characters were given the short shrift when it came to meaty storylines and development. While Steve (Joe Keery) became the unlikely hero of the new season and Dustin (Gaten Matarazzo) became the standout among the boys, the rest were less defined. Fortunately, the Duffers told IndieWire that they were already planning on focusing on more character-based stories in Season 3. Below are a few suggestions for what we’d like to see when the show returns to Hawkins, Indiana.

[Editor’s Note: The following article contains spoilers for “Stranger Things 2.”]

Read More:‘Stranger Things’ Season 3: The Duffer Brothers Promise ‘Weirder,’ More Character-Centric Stories Keep the Obscure Soundtracks Coming

Not sure if you’re aware, but the television show “Stranger Things” takes place in the 1980s. In case you were ever unsure of the time period, there are plenty of songs to help remind you.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Future Man’ Review: Seth Rogen’s Zealously Bawdy Hulu Series Riffs on Sci-Fi Classics for New-ish Adventures

  • Indiewire
‘Future Man’ Review: Seth Rogen’s Zealously Bawdy Hulu Series Riffs on Sci-Fi Classics for New-ish Adventures
In referential narratives, there’s a point where a nod to popular culture becomes so obvious the writers feel the need to specifically acknowledge it. “Community” consistently did this well, crafting individual episodes around known films or TV shows, like “A Fistful of Paintballs” or “Documentary Filmmaking: Redux,” and naming their episodes after the homages (if not directly announcing them in the narrative). But those were one-off spoofs of form as much as function, featuring stylistic touches that served as a tip of the hat to the filmmakers. They were quickly forgotten as the long-term story moved on to another target the next episode.

The Orville” is perhaps a more accurate comparison for “Future Man,” given both shows are taking a premise made famous decades prior and repurposing it for their own benefit. Seth MacFarlane’s Fox series has failed spectacularly in bluntly copying “Star Trek,” missing both the motivation,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Future Man’ Review: Seth Rogen’s Zealously Bawdy Hulu Series Riffs on Sci-Fi Classics for New-ish Adventures

‘Future Man’ Review: Seth Rogen’s Zealously Bawdy Hulu Series Riffs on Sci-Fi Classics for New-ish Adventures
In referential narratives, there’s a point where a nod to popular culture becomes so obvious the writers feel the need to specifically acknowledge it. “Community” consistently did this well, crafting individual episodes around known films or TV shows, like “A Fistful of Paintballs” or “Documentary Filmmaking: Redux,” and naming their episodes after the homages (if not directly announcing them in the narrative). But those were one-off spoofs of form as much as function, featuring stylistic touches that served as a tip of the hat to the filmmakers. They were quickly forgotten as the long-term story moved on to another target the next episode.

The Orville” is perhaps a more accurate comparison for “Future Man,” given both shows are taking a premise made famous decades prior and repurposing it for their own benefit. Seth MacFarlane’s Fox series has failed spectacularly in bluntly copying “Star Trek,” missing both the motivation,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Star Wars’ Producer Kathleen Kennedy Honored by Art Directors Guild

‘Star Wars’ Producer Kathleen Kennedy Honored by Art Directors Guild
The Art Directors Guild has selected “Star Wars” producer Kathleen Kennedy, as the recipient of its Cinematic Imagery Award.

The guild will present the honor Jan. 27 at its 22nd Annual Art Directors Guild.s Excellence in Production Design Awards. The event will be held at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood and Highland.

Adg President Nelson Coates said, “We are thrilled to recognize the amazing contributions Kathleen Kennedy has made to narrative design for more than three decades, while so beautifully creating a cinematic legacy as represented by some of the most successful movies of our time.”

“Ms. Kennedy is truly a significant role model,” Coates added. “Her creative legacy and professional journey is an inspirational example to all young artists who are in search of a meaningful career in the entertainment industry. Through her perseverance, talent and leadership, she has become an icon elevating the art of production design. She continues
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Lego Movie Franchise: The Marriage of Movies and Merchandising

Sarah Myles on The Lego Movie franchise and the marriage of movie merchandising…

Forty years ago, there was a seismic shift in the film industry, when Bernard Loomis of Kenner Toys decided that Star Wars was ‘toyetic.’ That shift, all those years ago, has led us on a journey of courtship between movies and merchandising, that has brought us to The Lego Movie franchise. There have been many diversions along way – perhaps, most notably, Hasbro and the Transformers film franchise – but Lego… well, Lego is different. Lego – with all its flexibility and trans-generational appeal – has created the ultimate marriage between movies and merchandise.

The rise of movie merchandising

Bernard Loomis was a toy development executive who had worked for Mattel during the introduction of its Hot Wheels line of toy cars in the late 1960s, and proposed the animated television show that subsequently went along with it. Such an endeavour proved problematic,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Replacing Kevin Spacey on ‘All the Money in the World’ Will Cost Millions

Replacing Kevin Spacey on ‘All the Money in the World’ Will Cost Millions
Ridley Scott’s decision to fire embattled actor Kevin Spacey and replace him with Christopher Plummer comes at a financial risk and carries a significant price tag, as the director races to finish the “All the Money in the World” ahead of its planned Dec. 22 release date.

It’s an unprecedented move, one that’s full of logistical challenges, as well as added, unexpected costs for reshoots, post-production, and the creation of new marketing materials. Some marketers estimate that the creation of new trailers, posters, in-theater standees, and additional advertising campaigns could total millions once rush fees and take-down costs are added up.

Despite the headaches and hit to the wallet, it’s a step that Scott and the film’s financiers Imperative Entertainment deemed necessary in the wake of several sexual assault and harassment allegations against Spacey, who plays billionaire J. Paul Getty in the picture. They felt that continuing on the project with Spacey’s name
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cool Stuff: Let Mr. Fusion from ‘Back to the Future Part II’ Charge Your Phone

  • Slash Film
Cool Stuff: Let Mr. Fusion from ‘Back to the Future Part II’ Charge Your Phone
When Doc Brown barrels into Marty McFly’s driveway at the end of Back to the Future, not only does he come with concerns about the future, but he has a new piece of technology. While the original Back to the Future time machine needed plutonium to create a nuclear reaction to generate the 1.21 gigawatts […]

The post Cool Stuff: Let Mr. Fusion from ‘Back to the Future Part II’ Charge Your Phone appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

The Morning Watch: ‘Back to the Future’ VFX, Taika Waititi’s Tragic Comedy & More

  • Slash Film
The Morning Watch: ‘Back to the Future’ VFX, Taika Waititi’s Tragic Comedy & More
The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows. In this edition, a video essay explores how Thor: Ragnarok director […]

The post The Morning Watch: ‘Back to the Future’ VFX, Taika Waititi’s Tragic Comedy & More appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

‘Coco’ Review: Pixar’s Latest Proves That the Studio Still Has Some Life in its Bones

  • Indiewire
‘Coco’ Review: Pixar’s Latest Proves That the Studio Still Has Some Life in its Bones
Pixar movies still make money hand over fist, but it’s hardly a secret that Luxo the lamp isn’t shining quite as bright as it used to. Once upon a time, the company’s animated offerings were genuine cultural events, the best of them (“Ratatouille,” “Finding Nemo”) even meriting comparison to the masterpieces of Studio Ghibli. While their films reliably still clear the low bar set by some of their competition — there’s a world of difference between the noble failure of “The Good Dinosaur” and the artless cynicism of “The Boss Baby” — three entire “Cars” movies have taken their toll.

Now, with sequels becoming more of a rule than an exception, Pixar finds themselves at something of an inflection point in their young history: Are they going to recommit to the bold originality that made them such a powerhouse, or are they going to continue recycling old stories
See full article at Indiewire »

Back To The Future DeLorean Inspired Gullwing Door Volkswagen Bus

I don’t know about you but the first thought to enter my mind upon seeing this is, weren’t the terrorists that shot Doc Brown driving a van like this? I think they were, and we’re getting a look at what could have been if they’d managed to be the ones that were smart enough to come up with the time machine design. Maybe that’s part of what they were trying to use the plutonium for? Nah, that’s stretching things pretty far, especially considering that this van couldn’t possibly reach the 88-miles and hour needed without falling off a cliff and

Back To The Future DeLorean Inspired Gullwing Door Volkswagen Bus
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Predator: 9 Unforgettable Moments from Alan Silvestri’s Soundtrack

With the Arnie classic enjoying a one-day re-release to mark its 30th anniversary, Sean Wilson unpacks the secrets of Predator’s genre-defining score…

It’s a very good time to be an Alan Silvestri fan at the moment. Not only is the veteran Back to the Future composer assigned to both Steven Spielberg’s Ready Player One and Marvel’s Avengers: Infinity War (both released next year), but one of his pivotal soundtracks is now back in the spotlight.

Composed in 1987 Predator remains one of the defining moments of Silvestri’s career, not to mention one of the most memorable soundtracks for an Arnold Schwarzenegger movie. The film itself, currently enjoying a one-day re-release to mark its 30th anniversary, needs little introduction: an unfeasibly macho, jungle-based thriller about a group of highly skilled military operatives who are picked off one by one by a camouflaged alien killer from another world.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Poster of the Week: The Top 10 Favorite Posters of Nathan Gelgud

  • MUBI
A couple of weeks ago, I interviewed Nathan Gelgud, an artist who has brought a wry comic book charm to the world of cinephilia. It seemed only natural that I should find out more about the art that has influenced him and so I asked him to select his personal top ten favorite movie posters. He was more than up for the challenge and decided to narrow the field to illustrated posters, which makes perfect sense. Here are his ten favorites, in no special order.1. (Above) Us one sheet for Five on the Black Hand Side (Oscar Williams, USA, 1973). Artist: Jack Davis.I love all the accouterments on the main figure—the hat, the cigar, the umbrella, suitcase, those things that go over the shoes. But even better is the way Davis has arranged all the characters around him, the way the jumping guy’s arm joins with the guy
See full article at MUBI »
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