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2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ breaks Best British Film curse

2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ breaks Best British Film curse
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” won the very first BAFTA Award of the evening on Feb. 18 when it was named Best British Film. And it ended the night by claiming the Best Picture prize. That marked just the second time since the British academy reintroduced Best British Film in 1992 that the same movie won both awards. The only other double dipper was “The King’s Speech,” which went to win Best Picture at the Oscars in 2011.

It might seem odd that a film like “Three Billboards,” which is set in the American heartland, qualified for consideration as Best British Film. However, it was written and directed by an Englishman, Martin McDonagh, and co-financed by UK broadcaster Channel 4.

See 2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards’ wins 5 including Best Picture, ‘The Shape of Water’ takes 3 [Updating Live]

Over the last quarter century, seven other British films have been named Best Picture at the BAFTAs: “Howards End
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Baftas: Will Best British Film curse strike down ‘Darkest Hour’ or ‘Three Billboards’?

2018 Baftas: Will Best British Film curse strike down ‘Darkest Hour’ or ‘Three Billboards’?
“Darkest Hour” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” each reaped nine nominations for the 2018 BAFTA Awards. Among these are bids for Best British Film. While that nomination for the former makes sense given the subject matter and pedigree of Joe Wright‘s biopic about prime minister Winston Churchill, the latter doesn’t appear to be British. However, while the film is set in the American heartland, it was written and directed by an Englishman, Martin McDonagh, and that qualified it for consideration in this category.

Both films also number among the five in contention for Best Picture, alongside the American-made “The Shape of Water” and the international co-productions “Call Me By Your Name” and “Dunkirk.” Fans of either of “Darkest Hour” or “Three Billboards” should be rooting for one of their rivals in the Best British Film race — “The Death of Stalin,” “God’s Own Country,” “Lady Macbeth” or “Paddington 2” — to win on Feb.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s: Robin Williams, Cuba Gooding Jr, Joe Pesci … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s: Robin Williams, Cuba Gooding Jr, Joe Pesci … ? [Poll]
The Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in the 1990s went to many long overdue veterans of the industry. Actors like James Coburn, Jack Palance and Martin Landau finally earned Oscars in this decade, alongside then-newer stars like Cuba Gooding Jr and Kevin Spacey. What is your favorite Best Supporting Actor performance of the 1990s?

Read through a recap of their performances and vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Supporting Actor.)

Joe Pesci, “Goodfellas” (1990) — Joe Pesci won his Oscar with the most iconic role of his career. In “Goodfellas” Pesci plays Tommy DeVito, a blustering gangster who provides some of the funniest lines in the film. Pesci was previously nominated in Best Supporting Actor for “Raging Bull” (1980).

SEEWho’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of the 1990s: Steven Spielberg, James Cameron, Jonathan Demme … ? [Poll]

Jack Palance, “City Slickers” (1991) — Jack Palance finally won his Oscar thanks to “City Slickers,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘Sophie’s Choice’: A look back at her second Oscar win and the competition

Meryl Streep in ‘Sophie’s Choice’: A look back at her second Oscar win and the competition
This article marks Part 4 of the 21-part Gold Derby series Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

After “The French Lieutenant’s Woman” in 1981, Meryl Streep lined up two exciting projects for the following year, both lead turns and both given prime late-year release dates for Academy Awards consideration.

First on tap was Streep’s much-anticipated reunion with “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979) director Robert Benton. “Still of the Night” would mark her first big screen thriller to date, pairing Streep with two-time Oscar nominee Roy Scheider. Exciting, right? Well, the Benton picture came and went that November in the blink of an eye, failing to even crack the box office top 10. Not only were reviews for the film itself lukewarm but critics argued both
See full article at Gold Derby »

Win A Family Four Pack Of Passes To The Advance Screening Of Paddington 2 In St. Louis

Following the worldwide hit “Paddington,” one of the most successful family films of all time, this much-anticipated sequel finds Paddington (Ben Whishaw) happily settled with the Brown family in London, where he has become a popular member of the local community, spreading joy and marmalade wherever he goes.

While searching for the perfect present for his beloved Aunt Lucy’s hundredth birthday, Paddington sees a unique pop-up book in Mr. Gruber’s antique shop, and embarks upon a series of odd jobs to buy it. But when the book is stolen, it’s up to Paddington and the Browns to unmask the thief.

Reuniting many of the original film’s cast while welcoming those in new roles, Paddington 2 stars Golden Globe nominee Hugh Bonneville (“Downton Abbey”), Oscar nominee Sally Hawkins (“Blue Jasmine”), three-time Golden Globe nominee Brendan Gleeson (“The Guard,” “Into the Storm,” “In Bruges”), Oscar nominee Julie Walters (“Billy Elliot,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Olivia de Havilland on Becoming the Oldest Person to Be Named a Dame: I’m ‘Extremely Proud’

Olivia de Havilland on Becoming the Oldest Person to Be Named a Dame: I’m ‘Extremely Proud’
The actress known to millions as Gone With the Wind‘s Melanie Wilkes is now officially Dame Olivia de Havilland.

The 100-year-old two-time Oscar winner was named a Dame Commander in Queen Elizabeth II‘s Birthday Honors list on Saturday, becoming the oldest-ever person to achieve the distinction.

Of the honor, de Havilland said in a statement to People that she is “extremely proud that the Queen has appointed me a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire.”

“To receive this honor as my 101st birthday approaches is the most gratifying of birthday presents,” she said.

Promoted along
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Raising Caine: Sir Michael Going On In Style

Tony Black on screen legend Michael Caine

His recent political leanings aside, Sir Michael Caine remains one of the surviving legends of British and indeed American cinema of the last fifty years, and this weekend’s Going in Style–a heist caper directed by none other than ScrubsZach Braff–sees him share top billing with fellow aged legend Morgan Freeman for what seems the first time in a while. Over recent years the iconic British figure–known for his slick Cockney accent which bore fruit with numerous catchphrases in more than one seminal British film–has become more widely known to audiences as a character actor, heavily used in Christopher Nolan’s body of work since appearing as Alfred Pennyworth in Batman Begins.

So began a certain career resurgence for the man born Maurice Micklewhite under the sound of bow bells, but as Sir Michael–now into his 80’s
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Always in Style – The Forgotten Roles of Michael Caine

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Zehra Phelan

“You’re were only supposed to blow the bloody doors off” is and will always be Michael Caine’s most iconic line of all time, uttered in the 1969 British Caper The Italian Job. With a career spanning a hefty 64 years between 1953 and 2017, Caine hits our screens yet again this week starring opposite Morgan Freeman and Alan Arkin in Going in Style, a remake of the 1979 heist comedy directed by Zach Braff. It tells the story of a trio of retirees who plan to rob a bank after their pensions are cancelled, proving he isn’t quite ready to hang up his acting shoes to start drawing his own pension.

At the tender age of 84 the man previously known as Maurice Joseph Micklewhite, now known as Sir Michael Caine after being knighted by the queen in 2000, has starred in a staggering 125 films in his career to date. His
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Reliving the joys of an 80s TV Christmas

Jenny Morrill Dec 20, 2016

Russ Abbot, Bullseye, Noel Edmonds and a film we all watched in the same room. Christmas TV was more exciting in the 80s...

Cast your mind back to when Christmas Day wasn't about Doctor Who followed by sticking something on Netflix until it was time to go watch the annual fist fight outside the pub.

See related Looking back at Martin Scorsese's The King Of Comedy The Wolf Of Wall Street review The Wolf Of Wall Street & Scorsese's confrontational films

In the 80s, Christmas was about seeing which fantastic fare the TV had decided to bless us with. Of course, the more prepared among us knew this well in advance, having eagerly pored over the Radio Times/TV Times to check that Jimmy Cricket's Family Laugh 'n' Waz would be shown. There it was – right after Reflections On The Eucharist With The Reverend Paul Leyland.
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘The Crown’ Creator Peter Morgan on the Making of His Royal Series

‘The Crown’ Creator Peter Morgan on the Making of His Royal Series
Writer Peter Morgan is well-versed in the world of Queen Elizabeth, given his award-winning film “The Queen” and his play “The Audience.” But he found he still has more story to tell about the monarch with his new TV series, “The Crown,” which bows Nov. 4 on Netflix.

Here, he tells Variety about his inspiration for the lavish new drama, how he cast the lead roles, and what’s in store for future seasons.

Why did you want to tell this story?

I didn’t really. I’m sick of writing the world of Elizabeth. But when we did the play “The Audience” the scene between Churchill and the young queen struck me as having lots of potential — this young 25-year-old girl and this 73-year-old, this daughter and this grandfather. And yet he was so in awe of her. I thought, I’d like to try writing this as a movie, Churchill
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Taking ‘The Crown’: Behind the Royal Treatment of Netflix’s New Series

“Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown,” Shakespeare wrote. Centuries later, little has changed: The Bard would have found plenty of inspiration in the eternal dramas of the British monarchy.

As has Peter Morgan, screenwriter of the 2006 film “The Queen,” which earned him an Oscar nomination for best screenplay (not to mention a trophy for Helen Mirren in the title role).

But it was Morgan’s 2013 play “The Audience” — about the weekly meetings between the Queen (Mirren) and her prime ministers — that inspired his latest deep dive into the political and personal machinations of British royalty: Netflix’s opulent, ambitious 10-part series “The Crown” (bowing Nov. 4). The drama, which costs $100 million to produce per season, chronicles Queen Elizabeth II as a young wife and mother, struggling with the burdens of a throne that is thrust upon her after her father suddenly dies.

“I’m sick of writing the world of Elizabeth,” admits
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Who should direct / star in the next Bond?

In not surprising news, Sam Mendes is moving on from the 007 franchise after Skyfall (2012) and Spectre (2015). Daniel Craig is probably moving on, too, but rumors about who will replace him are, as ever, premature. The names floating about this time are Idris Elba and Tom Hiddleston (wishful fan thinking, maybe, since the internet has been suggesting these two names forever) and 30 year old Jamie Bell which is an interesting idea and probably not a bad one. If chosen he'd be the youngest Bond since Sean Connery (who was 30 when he was cast for Dr. No (1962) though most subsequent Bonds have been around 40 when they started. Plus Bell is super charismatic but underused in cinema.

Though Bond films are largely regarded as producer driven and leading actor focused pictures, rather than directorial feats, the man in the chair is important. In the past the franchise has generally relied on mid level directors rather than auteurs,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Celebrating the B-movie performances of Michael Caine

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From killer bees to Steven Seagal, Michael Caine's seen it all. We celebrate five hilarious performances in five very bad B-movies...

"If there is one thing worse than being offered bad scripts it's being offered none at all," Michael Caine once noted - an admission that might explain some of the roles he's taken on over his long and often wonderful career.

Michael Caine may have attained national treasure status now, but from the late 70s to the middle of the 90s, classic roles like Dr Frank Bryant in Educating Rita and Scrooge The Muppet Christmas Carol were interspersed with some - shall we say - less acclaimed movies. Yet even when the production values were awful, the script stank and the films flopped, Michael Caine's performances often remained fascinating. This isn't to say he was necessarily putting his heart and soul into them -
See full article at Den of Geek »

Michael Caine to receive rare Efa honour

  • ScreenDaily
Michael Caine to receive rare Efa honour
European Film Academy to award “long overdue” honour to veteran British actor.

Sir Michael Caine is to be presented with the Honorary Award of the Efa President and Board at the 28th European Film Awards - only the third time the honour as been bestowed in nearly 30 years.

The British actor, whose 60-year career has run from Alfie and The Italian Job to The Dark Knight trilogy, will accept the award at the EFAs on Dec 12 in Berlin.

Caine is also nominated for his performance in Paolo Sorrentino’s Youth. He was previously nominated in 2001 for Fred Schepisi’s Last Orders.

In a joint statement, Efa Board chair Agnieszka Holland and Efa President Wim Wenders said: “We have come to the decision that we are long overdue on paying special tribute to Sir Michael Caine.

“This recognition to an outstanding film personality is coming from the bottom of our hearts and has only been presented twice in the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Michael Caine to recieve rare Efa honour

  • ScreenDaily
Michael Caine to recieve rare Efa honour
European Film Academy to award “long overdue” honour to veteran British actor.

Sir Michael Caine is to be presented with the Honorary Award of the Efa President and Board at the 28th European Film Awards - only the third time the honour as been bestowed in nearly 30 years.

The British actor, whose 60-year career has run from Alfie and The Italian Job to The Dark Knight trilogy, will accept the award at the EFAs on Dec 12 in Berlin.

Caine is also nominated for his performance in Paolo Sorrentino’s Youth. He was previously nominated in 2001 for Fred Schepisi’s Last Orders.

In a joint statement, Efa Board chair Agnieszka Holland and Efa President Wim Wenders said: “We have come to the decision that we are long overdue on paying special tribute to Sir Michael Caine.

“This recognition to an outstanding film personality is coming from the bottom of our hearts and has only been presented twice in the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Michael Caine to Receive European Film Academy Honorary Award

Michael Caine to Receive European Film Academy Honorary Award
London — Michael Caine will be presented with the Honorary Award of the European Film Academy president and board at the European Film Awards ceremony on Dec. 12. It is only the third time the award has been bestowed in almost 30 years.

Agnieszka Holland, chairwoman of the European Film Academy board, and Efa president Wim Wenders said in a statement: “We have come to the decision that we are long overdue on paying special tribute to Sir Michael Caine. This recognition to an outstanding film personality is coming from the bottom of our hearts, and has only been presented twice in the almost 30 years of the European Film Awards: to our founding member Manoel de Oliveira and to Michel Piccoli.”

Caine has performed in more than 100 films. His most memorable roles include the spy Harry Palmer in “The Ipcress File” (1965), womanizer “Alfie” (1966), the gangster Charlie Croker in “The Italian Job” (1969), the hairdresser
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Captain Webb

From tragedy to triumph. Screenwriter Jemma Kennedy writes about recallibrating Captain Webb.

In his play Educating Rita, Willy Russell famously articulates the difference between the tragedy and the merely tragic. Any event, such as a tree falling and killing a man, may be called tragic, but a real tragedy is one in which the hero is doomed by his fatal flaw. Character, not just circumstance, drives him inexorably to his doom.

I thought about this a lot when writing Captain Webb – the titular character was the first man to swim the English Channel in 1875.
See full article at Pure Movies »

What to Watch: Tonight's TV Picks - Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell

Sunday Night at the Palladium: ITV, 8pm

In the last Sunday Night at the Palladium of the series, Jack Whitehall presents as a whole host of talented stars take to the stage.

There's music from Leona Lewis, Jess Glynne and Simply Red as well as comedy from Sara Pascoe and Britain's Got Talents' Jack Carroll.

Julie Walters in Conversation with Richard E Grant: BBC Four, 8pm

Award-winning actress Julie Walters talks about her successful career, from her movie debut in Educating Rita to more recent works.

Presented by Richard E Grant, this is the first in a series of BBC Four shows celebrating leading figures in the British film industry.

Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell: BBC One, 9pm

Tonight's episode sees tensions between the pair when Strange becomes obsessed with the Raven King's magic and Norrell doesn't approve.

Strange tries to cure mad King George III, but soon realises that
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Easter TV movie guide: Saturday April 4 - Ben-Hur, Pretty Woman

Easter TV movie guide: Saturday April 4 - Ben-Hur, Pretty Woman
My Girl - 9.10am, Watch

Tomboy Vada Sultenfuss (Anna Chlumsky) is obsessed with death. When her father, the mortician of the funeral parlour she lives above, hires Shelly (Jamie Lee Curtis), Vada sets out to spy on the couple with her best friend Thomas J (Macaulay Culkin).

My Neighbour Totoro - 1pm, Film4

In this awe-inspiring animation from Hayao Miyazaki, director of Spirited Away and Princess Mononoke, two girls have charming adventures with the mysterious forest sprite that neighbours their new house in the country.

Ben-Hur - 3.05pm, 5Usa

Oscar-winning Biblical epic starring Charlton Heston as a Jewish prince who's betrayed and condemned into slavery by his childhood friend, later regaining his freedom and returning to take revenge. Featuring one of the most iconic climaxes in cinema history - the chariot race - you can't miss the opportunity to re-watch this classic.

Honey, I Shrunk the Kids - 6pm, Comedy Central
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Julie Walters interview: Looking back over her career

Julie Walters is such a legendary actress - who's been in all sorts of beloved films and TV Shows - that it's no surprise she was awarded a BAFTA Fellowship earlier this year. And now, her career will be examined in a new TV show airing tonight (Christmas Eve).

We caught up with Julie recently to chat about her varied career, so read on to find out why she wishes she'd kept something from the Harry Potter set, why slippers with bobbles bring back bad memories, and why she wants to be a Bond villain...

Was getting the Fellowship a nice chance to look back at the highs and lows of your career?

"Yes. Well, you don't really look at the lows. To be perfectly honest, when you get it, I don't look back at anything really. There were clips, weren't there? Yes, of course there were, on the night.
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »
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