Stardust Memories (1980) - News Poster

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Drive-In Dust Offs: The Funhouse (1981)

  • DailyDead
Everyone needs an escape from time to time. A place apart from reality, where the strange whisper with the miraculous, and cheap trinkets are bartered with greasy denizens of the night. What better place to set a horror film than the carnival, where the potential for mystery awaits around every crimson tent and distorted mirror? If you’re so inclined, step right up and buy a ticket to The Funhouse (1981), the late Tobe Hooper’s wonderful tribute to the seedy shadowed world of carnies, caramel apples, and Universal monsters.

Released in March by Universal, The Funhouse underperformed at the box office, but critics (including Gene Siskel) admired it for focusing on suspense and thrills rather than gruesome mayhem. In a landscape littered with severed limbs and phallically inclined urban legends, Mr. Hooper used his genius to once again showcase the underbelly of the American psyche, this time with a major studio’s dollars.
See full article at DailyDead »

C.H.U.D. – The Blu Review

Review by Roger Carpenter

Made at the height of the creature feature resurgence popularized by films like The Howling, An American Werewolf in London, Wolfen, Humanoids from the Deep, and The Boogens, C.H.U.D. (1984) was a (very) low budget film that was briefly popular upon its release and became a staple of the mid-80’s video stores that seemed to pop up like weeds around that time. We tend to throw around terms like “cult classic” a little too lightly nowadays. I don’t think C.H.U.D. qualifies as a genuine “cult classic,” but the film certainly has legs over three decades plus since its original release.

Perhaps those “legs” have something to do with the coverage from the popular Fangoria magazine during production of the film. Or maybe it had to do with the schlocky but nonetheless horrific rubber monster suits worn for the CHUDs (actually foam latex) to go along
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Norman Review

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Stefan Pape

Quietly, Richard Gere is consistently making rather good movies, telling interesting stories and taking on nuanced, intriguing roles. From The Benefactor to Arbitrage (let’s just forget The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel for now) – he’s tackling intimate character studies, and his latest, Joseph Cedar’s Norman, is no different.

Gere plays the eponymous protagonist, a professional chancer and over-enthused fixer – only problem is, nobody will actually let him get close enough to fix anything. Until he meets Eshel (Lior Ashkenazi), an Israeli politician spending some time in New York, touched by Norman’s offer to buy him a pair of shoes. Three years pass, and Eshel is now an influential world leader, as the Prime Minister of his native country, and when he returns to the States to meet the President, Norman shows up at a function – and they remember each other well. To have
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Cannes Review: ‘Redoubtable’ Offers a Playful Pastiche on the Re-Radicalization of Jean-Luc Godard

It’s more Pastiche du Godard than Histoire(s) du Godard in Michel Hazanavicius’ Redoubtable and that’s not a bad thing. The director’s slight but surprisingly playful account of nouvelle vague maestro Jean-Luc Godard’s marriage to actress Anne Wiazemsky and his re-radicalization in the late 1960s has the potential to infuriate the more devout of Godard followers but there is plenty of good-hearted goading and creative homage to savor for the less pedantic fan.

Honing in on a tumultuous time for Godard and his adoptive France, Hazanavicius charts the relationship between him and Wiazemsky from beginning — on the set of his 1967 film La Chinoise — to end, taking in the 1968 protests and subsequent student movement (“I like the movement, not the students,” he later exclaims) as well as Godard’s own abstract departures from his previous filmmaking methods. It marks a welcome return for the director (Michel that
See full article at The Film Stage »

On my radar: Charlotte Rampling’s cultural highlights

The actor reveals her favourite Parisian hangouts, her love of timeless, authentic places, and the book that’s teaching her to understand cats

Born in Sturmer, Essex, Charlotte Rampling was brought up in Gibraltar, France and Spain. After briefly working as a model she turned to acting, appearing in Georgy Girl (1966), The Damned (1969), The Night Porter (1974), Woody Allen’s Stardust Memories (1980) and several François Ozon films, including Swimming Pool (2003). In 2015 she won a number of awards for her role in Andrew Haigh’s 45 Years. Rampling has been nominated four times for France’s César awards, winning once. She was made an OBE in 2000, and received France’s Légion d’Honneur in 2002. Her TV work includes Dexter, Broadchurch and London Spy. Her new autobiography, Who I Am, is published by Icon and on 27 May she discusses her life and career at the Hay festival.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Review: Woody Allen's "Interiors" (1978); Blu-ray Release From Twilight Time

  • CinemaRetro
“A Long Day’S Journey Into A Little Night Silence”

By Raymond Benson

Woody’s Allen’s first dramatic feature film, Interiors, released in 1978 on the heels of his hugely successful and Oscar-winning masterpiece, Annie Hall, was met with praise by some and head-scratching by others. Most critics, however, acknowledged that the picture was a step the artist needed to take in his evolution as a filmmaker.

Prior to Annie Hall, Allen’s films were zany comedies—the “early funny ones,” as facetiously described in a later work, Stardust Memories. Beginning with Annie, Allen made a quantum leap forward in originality, confidence, and stylistic maturity. He reinvented the romantic comedy. In many ways, Annie Hall is a movie with a European sensibility. It could be argued that Allen’s body of work post-Annie resembles the kind of material made by a director like, say, Francois Truffaut—small, well-written, intimate gems about people,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Review: Woody Allen's "Stardust Memories" (1980); Twilight Time Blu-ray Limited Edition

  • CinemaRetro
“Allen’S 9-1/2”

By Raymond Benson

If one facetiously counted the number of films Woody Allen made beginning in 1969 and throughout the 70s, there would be eight that he wrote and directed (seven of which he also starred in), plus a movie that he only wrote and starred in—Play It Again, Sam, for which I’ll count as 1/2, making Stardust Memories number 9-1/2. Appropriately, this film seems to intentionally pay homage to Federico Fellini’s own masterwork, 8-1/2 (1963), which was about a filmmaker who didn’t know what movie he wanted to shoot next. Stardust Memories, released in 1980 after the huge successes of Annie Hall and Manhattan (with critically-acclaimed Interiors in-between), is also about a filmmaker in search of the picture he wants to make.

It wasn’t well-received at the time. I recall leaving the theater in anger. How could Woody be so contemptuous of his audience? It was as if his character,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Turner’s FilmStruck Movie-Subscription Service Now on Apple TV; Roku, Chromecast Promised in 2017

Turner’s FilmStruck Movie-Subscription Service Now on Apple TV; Roku, Chromecast Promised in 2017
FilmStruck, Turner’s subscription movie service for film fans, is now available on fourth-generation Apple TV set-tops.

FilmStruck, which launched Nov. 1 after a two-week delay, offers hundreds of current and classic arthouse, indie, foreign and cult films and is the exclusive streaming home to the Criterion Collection. Apple TV joins the service’s lineup of other devices, including Amazon Fire TV and iOS and Android devices, and it’s also available on the web.

Turner says it plans to add FilmStruck access for Roku devices and Google Chromecast in early 2017, followed by Sony’s PlayStation 4 and Microsoft Xbox One later in the year.

Related

After Delay, Turner Launches Netflix-Style FilmStruck Service With Classic, Indie and Foreign Movies

The service, managed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM), is available only in the U.S. initially. Pricing starts at $6.99 per month without the Criterion Channel, and $10.99 monthly with the Criterion Channel. Turner also
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Exclusive: Sharon Stone Delivers a Devastating Performance in New 'Life on the Line' Clip

Exclusive: Sharon Stone Delivers a Devastating Performance in New 'Life on the Line' Clip
Sharon Stone is no stranger to delivering powerhouse performances as seen in The Mighty, Bobby and Casino, which earned her an Oscar nomination, as well as on TV in The Practice and Law & Order: Svu.

After a short break from the big screen, the 58-year-old actress is back with several new films, including spring’s Mothers and Daughters and the new working-class drama, Life on the Line, which co-stars John Travolta, Devon Sawa and Kate Bosworth.

In the Lionsgate Premiere film about linemen who put their life on the line to keep the electric grid running, Stone plays an emotionally-exhausted mother to Duncan (Sawa). And Et has an exclusive first look at a devastating scene she shares with her on-screen son. (Watch above.)

More: John Travolta and Kelly Preston on Playing John and Victoria Gotti: 'You Can See the Intimacy'

While there’s no questioning Stone’s raw star power seen in the film, there was a time
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Turner Delays Launch of FilmStruck Movie-Subscription Service

Turner has pushed back the launch of FilmStruck — its subscription VOD service with hundreds of indie, foreign, classic and cult films — to November, citing the need to iron out kinks on the registration process.

Originally, the service, developed and managed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) in collaboration with the Criterion Collection, was slated to debut on Wednesday, Oct. 19.

Just like the final stages of completing a film, this additional time will allow us to put the finishing touches on FilmStruck in order to bring you a premium service with beautifully curated content and the largest streaming library of world-renowned arthouse, indie, cult and foreign films,” TCM said in an email to users who had registered with the service. “Rest assured, we’re working hard to bring you the high-quality streaming movie service you’ve been waiting for.”

Turner did not provide a specific date in November when FilmStruck will be available.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

FilmStruck and The Criterion Channel Reveal Subscription Pricing Plans

It’s been about half-a-year since we learned The Criterion Collection would be departing Hulu soon and bringing its entire streaming library to the new service FilmStruck, alongside films from Turner Classic Movies, Janus Films, Flicker Alley, Icarus, Kino, Milestone, Zeitgeist, Warners Bros. and more. Basically, it’s cinephile heaven, but on everyone’s mind is how much would this service-of-our-dreams cost?

Ahead of a launch on October 19, Turner has now revealed the subscription pricing plans, and thankfully it’s quite reasonable. The subscriptions are broken down into three options. First, for $6.99 a month, you get “a constantly refreshed library of hard to find & critically acclaimed films,” which we imagine will be the Mubi-style of a curated, more limited line-up featuring hand-picked selections from their entire library.

Then, for $10.99 a month, you get access to the entire The Criterion Channel, as well as exclusive bonus content, and “exclusive contemporary and previously unavailable films.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Red-Carpet Exclusive Portraits: Woody Allen for ‘Café Society’

Chicago – He is one of the most prolific American directors of the modern cinema era, and has also forged a career as stand-up comedian, actor, playwright and screenplay artist. He is Woody Allen, and he walked the Red Carpet at the Chicago History Museum on July 21st, 2016, for his new film ‘Café Society.’

The film is his 47th feature film as writer/director, from “What’s Up, Tiger Lily” (1966) to the present day, and highlights Allen’s strengths as an artist. “Café Society” is filled with romance, heartbreak and the glamour of 1930s Hollywood, and features Steve Carrell, Jesse Eisenberg, Kristen Stewart, Blake Lively, Corey Stoll and Parker Posey. It is schedule for nationwide release on July 29th, 2016

Woody Allen’s Latest Film is ‘Café Society, Releasing Nationwide on July 29th, 2016

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Woody Allen was born Allen Stewart Konigsberg in Brooklyn,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines
This Friday, Café Society, the latest release from writer/director/comic godhead Woody Allen, waltzes into theaters — the 47th feature Allen has directed over a career spanning 50 years. (Yes, we're counting New York Stories.) He's had box-office successes and outright bombs, Oscar-winning masterpieces and critically panned duds. But regardless of his movies' receptions (and the reoccurring rumors about his personal life), he's managed to pump out a film a year with impressive regularity. Some key elements have stayed the same — once a jazz clarinet slinks onto the soundtrack, audiences know exactly who they're dealing with.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines
This Friday, Café Society, the latest release from writer/director/comic godhead Woody Allen, waltzes into theaters — the 47th feature Allen has directed over a career spanning 50 years. (Yes, we're counting New York Stories.) He's had box-office successes and outright bombs, Oscar-winning masterpieces and critically panned duds. But regardless of his movies' receptions (and the reoccurring rumors about his personal life), he's managed to pump out a film a year with impressive regularity. Some key elements have stayed the same — once a jazz clarinet slinks onto the soundtrack, audiences know exactly who they're dealing with.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Oscar’S Year Of Visual Effects, and The Art Of Seeing And Believing

If you have been living and routinely interacting with other human beings over the last month, you’ve probably heard one or two words involving this year’s Academy Awards and the heated controversy over the startling lack of both films and people of color among the nominees. Personally, I think that the real focus of concern ought to be less on the back end-- awards handed out for films which were financed and/or studio-approved, scheduled for production and filmed perhaps as much as two or three years ago-- and more on addressing the lack of cultural and intellectual and experiential diversity among those who have the power to make the decisions as to what films get made in the first place. This is no sure-fire way to ensure that there will be a richer and more consistent representation of diverse creative voices when it comes time for Hollywood
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Lost in Karastan review – crazy caper with social-realist plausibility

Matthew Macfayden is a convincingly conceited director on the rocks who is seduced by a dictator’s offer of another shot at success

Award-winning film-maker Paweł Pawlikowski is here in a larksome mood, co-writing with Ben Hopkins this watchable satirical comedy about the international movie business. Hopkins directs, and together they split the difference between Borat and Woody Allen’s Stardust Memories. It’s a crazy caper about a washed-up British director named Emil Forester (Matthew Macfayden) who accepts a flattering invitation to attend a festival retrospective of his work in the comedy fictional state of Karastan. He arrives to find a bizarre and sinister shambles everywhere, and is disconcerted by his fellow guest, hard-drinking Hollywood B-lister Xan Butler (Noah Taylor). But Emil is intrigued by the president’s beautiful aide Chulpan (MyAnna Burling) and by the president himself (Richard Van Weyden) who offers him a lot of money to
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

NYC Weekend Watch: Bowie, Shakespeare, Ghibli, ‘How Green Was My Valley’ & More

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

In honor of David Bowie, Nagisa Oshima‘s Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence (on 35mm) and Nicolas Roeg‘s The Man Who Fell to Earth will screen for free on Friday.

Film Forum

“Stratford on Houston” bring the Bard to New York, with Richard III, Welles‘ and Polanski‘s Macbeth, The Taming of the Shrew,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Everything Steven Soderbergh Watched and Read in 2015

Displaying a transparency that few filmmakers of his fame and / or caliber would even bother with, Steven Soderbergh has, for a couple of years, been keen on releasing lists of what he watched and read during the previous twelve months. If you’re at all interested in this sort of thing — and why not? what else are you even doing with your day? — the 2015 selection should be of strong interest, this being a time when he was fully enmeshed in the world of creating television.

He’s clearly observing the medium with a close eye, be it what’s on air or what his friends (specifically David Fincher and his stillborn projects) show him, and how that might relate to his apparent love of 48 Hours Mystery or approach to a comparatively light slate of cinematic assignments — specifically: it seems odd that the last time he watched Magic Mike Xxl, a
See full article at The Film Stage »

Icon of Cool Charlotte Rampling Talks '45 Years,' Sculpting Her Acting Muscles, and Working with Woody Allen

Icon of Cool Charlotte Rampling Talks '45 Years,' Sculpting Her Acting Muscles, and Working with Woody Allen
The longer you talk to Charlotte Rampling, the more you are drawn into her hooded eyes, her laid back insouciance, her mature strength. This is a woman who has lived. I want to read her memoir. Based in Paris, she's worked in English with Sidney Lumet ("The Verdict"), Alan Parker ("Angel Heart"), Woody Allen ("Stardust Memories") and Lars von Trier ("Melancholia"), French with Francois Ozon (Cesar-nominated "Under the Sand" and "Swimming Pool") and Italian with directors Luchino Visconti ("The Damned") and Lilliana Cavani ("The Night Porter"). Over the course of the year "45 Years" (Sundance Selects, December 23) has been blazing a festival trail from Berlin (where Courtenay and Rampling won Best Actor and Actress) to Telluride and Toronto. Haigh adapted "45 Years" from a short story by poet David Constantine, which anticipates the anniversary of Geoff and Kate’s seemingly...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Fassbender Becomes Only Fourth Double Best Actor Winner: L.A. Critics Awards

'Son of Saul': Géza Röhrig in the Los Angeles Film Critics Awards' Best Foreign Language Film winner. Charlotte Rampling, Michael Fassbender: Los Angeles Film Critics Awards 2015 The Los Angeles Film Critics Association's 2015 winners were announced on Sunday, Dec. 6. Lafca is one of the two most influential critics groups – i.e., those whose decisions get at least some mainstream media mileage – in the United States. The other one is the much older New York Film Critics Circle, followed by the National Society of Film Critics. Five-decade movie veteran Charlotte Rampling,[1] who'll turn 70 next Feb. 5, was one of the day's big winners. Besides being selected Best Actress by the Los Angeles Film Critics for her performance in 45 Years, Rampling was also the 2015 Boston Society of Film Critics' pick. Earlier this year, Andrew Haigh's marital drama costarring Tom Courtenay (Doctor Zhivago, The Dresser) earned her the Silver Bear for Best Actress at the Berlin Film Festival.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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