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(1979)

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‘Hellraiser’ back in cinemas and on Blu-ray

Starring Andrew Robinson (Dirty Harry, Charley Varrick), Clare Higgins (Hellbound: Hellraiser 2, Silent Witness), Ashley Laurence (Hellbound: Hellraiser 2, Lurking Fear), Sean Chapman (Made in Britain, Scum) and directed by Clive Barker (Nightbreed, Lord of Illusions), Hellraiser is returning to cinemas and receiving a gorgeous Blu-ray Steelbook just in time for Halloween!

That’s right folks Pinhead and his Cenobites are back in the cinema to celebrate the big 30th year anniversary and guess what… The folks at Arrow Films/Video are releasing a beautiful steelbook on October 30th too! If your a horror hound this is a must buy steelbook and a must revisit in the cinema. The 30th Anniversary re-release of Hellraiser – appropriately debuting on Friday 13th October – gives audiences a chance to see it once more in all its gory big screen glory and for the uninitiated to have their souls torn apart for the first time!

For those who are unfamiliar with Hellraiser,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Tim Roth on 'Tin Star,' Tarantino and Tupac

Tim Roth on 'Tin Star,' Tarantino and Tupac
Skinheads, hit men, cops, criminals, cops-posing-as-criminals, princes, junkies, executioners, politicians, supervillains, an 18th-century fop, a 19th-century impressionist painter and a 21st-century psychotic chimp – you name it, and there's an extremely good chance that Tim Roth has played it. The 56-year-old British actor has the sort of varied, overstuffed resumé that suggests a reserved spot in the steadily-working-character-actor canon, and has not one but two projects hitting TV screens at the moment: Tin Star, an Amazon thriller that about an expat cop living in Canada that starts as a quirky fish-out-of-water
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Tim Roth interview: Tin Star, Reservoir Dogs, Twin Peaks

Louisa Mellor Sep 8, 2017

Tim Roth leads an excellent cast in unpredictable new Sky Atlantic revenge drama Tin Star, out now…

“It’s the disposal,” says Tim Roth. “The killing isn’t the problem, it’s the disposal that’s the problem. You run out of space.” The storage issues faced by serial killers aren’t something to which many of us will have devoted much thought. Roth has. Reassuringly, he’s had reason to thanks to his recent sinister role as real-life murderer Reg Christie in BBC drama Rillington Place. “Charming fella” he jokes.

See related 26 new UK TV shows to look out for Life On Mars: revisiting a terrific UK crime drama Line Of Duty series 4: creator Jed Mercurio interview

Roth is back on UK television on the other side of the law in new Sky Atlantic drama Tin Star, which has already been renewed for a second series.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Critic's Picks: A July To-Do List for Film Buffs in L.A.

Critic's Picks: A July To-Do List for Film Buffs in L.A.
Scum At Cinefamily | 611 N Fairfax Ave.

Beginning Friday, a new Dcp restoration of British director Alan Clarke’s harrowing 1979 film Scum comes to Cinefamily for a well-deserved weeklong run. Set in an anonymous British borstal, a youth detention center for only the most violent and unrepentant of young men, Scum follows the arrival and uneasy integration of three new inmates played by Ray Winstone, Julian Firth and Alrick Riley. In short, brutal order, sides are taken and the tenuous dynamic collapses, and through a series of gripping set pieces Clarke presents an unflinching vision of damaged masculinity at...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

NYC Weekend Watch: Queer Quad, ‘Safe,’ Simian Vérité & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Quad Cinema

Films by Fosse, Visconti, Chabrol, and Ed Wood play as part of “Quadrophilia: Queer Edition.”

Maurice and Funeral Parade of Roses continue playing.

Metrograph

The restoration of Alan Clarke’s Scum, a must-see, is now screening.

“Welcome to Metrograph A-z” continues, including multiple showings of Todd HaynesSafe.

A Father’s Day special occurs this Sunday.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Review: ‘Scum’ is an Unflinching Powerhouse of Brute Force

Though released nearly four decades ago, the impact of British director Alan Clarke’s stripped-down, visually matter-of-fact-yet-enrapturing “prison” drama Scum can still be felt in ripples throughout modern cinema, from the dirt-caked musings of the excellent Starred Up, to the philosophical discussion posed between a beaten Bobby Sands and stubborn priest in Steve McQueen’s Hunger. Shrouded in controversy upon its release, Scum has sat for years under the sort of “banned film” title that lends to a certain morbid fascination, which itself overlooks potential (or inherent) cinematic value. But Scum lives up to its title to this day, its manic energy balanced with an assured and naked openness that creates a searing level of realism and, as such, savagery.

Scum is set in a juvenile-offender institution that is more akin to youthful hell than a chance at redemption for its sordid inmates, who struggle, fall, and brawl in the
See full article at The Film Stage »

Ray Winstone Leads a Story of Survival in Restoration Trailer for Alan Clarke’s ‘Scum’

Alan Clarke‘s little-seen prison drama Scum has already been available on Blu-ray via Kino Lorber for a few years now, but they’ll finally be giving the 2K restoration a theatrical run later this year, and with this news comes a inventive new trailer. Playing with the film’s Banned label, the trailer features only stills from Scum — some tantalizing or provocative — and reviews from critics, read aloud by the hard-bit narrator.

Starring a young and spry Ray Winstone, Scum tells the story of life in a brutal British prison, where there’s no easy way out. While it seemingly had clause for a ban in the 70’s, what is perhaps most interesting is if it still contains shock value in today’s climate. See the trailer below, with a nod to Blu-ray.com.

A landmark expose of Britain’s violent reform schools, Alan Clarke’s Scum is a controversial shock to the system.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Trailer For Alan Clarke’s Newly Restored, Controversial ‘Scum’ Starring Ray Winstone

Kino Lorber continues their run of re-releasing interestingly obscure films with their newest addition, Alan Clarke’s 1979 film “Scum,” arriving with a fresh 2K restoration. The Ray Winstone starring film follows young violent thug Carlin as he arrives at a British reform school. While at the school, he rises through the ranks using violence and intimidation, eventually reaching the top of the school pecking order.

Continue reading Trailer For Alan Clarke’s Newly Restored, Controversial ‘Scum’ Starring Ray Winstone at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Les Arcs 2016 to spotlight new female film-makers

Les Arcs 2016 to spotlight new female film-makers
Houda Benyamina [pictured], Jessica Hausner and Rebecca Daly among directors due to attend the festival.

The Les Arcs European Film Festival will champion female filmmakers at its eighth edition unfolding in the heart of the French Alps Dec 10-17.

A sidebar titled The New Women of Cinema will screen features by 10 female directors including Houda Benyamina’s Caméra d’Or-winning Divines, Rebecca Daly’s Mammal and Rachel Lang’s Baden Baden.

Older titles such as Jessica Hausner’s Lourdes, Agnes Kocsis’ Fresh Air and Nanouk Leopold’s Brownian Movement are also included in the line-up

The initiative is an extension of the festival’s Femme de Cinema award introduced in 2013, the recipients of which have included Bosnian director Jamila Zbanic and Poland’s Małgorzata Szumowska.

Alongside the screenings, there will also be a presentation on a specially-commissioned study of emerging female directors, as well as round-tables and a master-class by one of the attending female directors.

The programme
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Les Arcs 2016 to spotlight new female filmmakers

Les Arcs 2016 to spotlight new female filmmakers
Houda Benyamina [pictured], Jessica Hausner and Rebecca Daly among directors due to attend the festival.

The Les Arcs European Film Festival will champion female filmmakers at its eighth edition unfolding in the heart of the French Alps Dec 10-17.

A sidebar titled The New Women of Cinema will screen features by 10 female directors including Houda Benyamina’s Caméra d’Or-winning Divines, Rebecca Daly’s Mammal and Rachel Lang’s Baden Baden.

Older titles such as Jessica Hausner’s Lourdes, Agnes Kocsis’ Fresh Air and Nanouk Leopold’s Brownian Movement are also included in the line-up

The initiative is an extension of the festival’s Femme de Cinema award introduced in 2013, the recipients of which have included Bosnian director Jamila Zbanic and Poland’s Małgorzata Szumowska.

Alongside the screenings, there will also be a presentation on a specially-commissioned study of emerging female directors, as well as round-tables and a master-class by one of the attending female directors.

The programme
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Robin Of Sherwood: looking back at a modern TV classic

Llinos Cathryn Thomas Aug 5, 2016

Thirty years since it ended, we revisit much-loved 80s historical fantasy series Robin Of Sherwood...

The Robin Hood legend has been retold in countless ways, but one of the most memorable of modern times is Richard Carpenter’s hugely influential 1980s imagining, telling the story of Sherwood’s band of outlaws with a combination of realism and luminous fantasy with its roots in British folklore.

Made by Htv in association with production company Goldcrest Films (which was also behind Chariots Of Fire and Gandhi), its 26 episodes ran on ITV from 1984 to 1986, garnering a positive critical reception and inspiring a fan following that’s still enthusiastically active today.

Much of the success of the show was down to the spot-on casting and the chemistry between the performers. Michael Praed’s charismatic-yet-otherworldly presence as Robin was the perfect match for the show’s aesthetic, and the more down-to-earth Little John,
See full article at Den of Geek »

David Bowie in Baal, Alan Clarke's 1982 Bertolt Brecht adaptation – video

In 1982, Scum director Alan Clarke cast David Bowie in an adaptation of Bertolt Brecht’s early play for the BBC. Baal was Brecht’s first full length play, written in 1918 (reworked in 1926). Bowie stars as the title character, an outcast poet/musician who has a series of affairs and is involved in a killing. Bowie, who had recently performed in The Elephant Man on Broadway, acted and sang the lead role, alongside a cast that included Jonathan Kent and Zoë Wanamaker. This exclusive clip comprises the first full minute of the film, including the “ichthyosaurus” monologue and the first two verses of Bowie’s rendition of Baal’s Hymn.

Baal is included in the Blu-ray box set Dissent and Disruption: Alan Clarke at the BBC (1969-1989) and in the DVD box set Alan Clarke at the BBC, Volume 2: Disruption (1978-1989), out this week1982 archive article: Nancy Banks-Smith’s
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

David Bowie in Baal, Alan Clarke's 1982 Bertolt Brecht adaptation – video

In 1982, Scum director Alan Clarke cast David Bowie in an adaptation of Bertolt Brecht’s early play for the BBC. Baal was Brecht’s first full length play, written in 1918 (reworked in 1926). Bowie stars as the title character, an outcast poet/musician who has a series of affairs and is involved in a killing. Bowie, who had recently performed in The Elephant Man on Broadway, acted and sang the lead role, alongside a cast that included Jonathan Kent and Zoë Wanamaker. This exclusive clip comprises the first full minute of the film, including the “ichthyosaurus” monologue and the first two verses of Bowie’s rendition of Baal’s Hymn.

Baal is included in the Blu-ray box set Dissent and Disruption: Alan Clarke at the BBC (1969-1989) and in the DVD box set Alan Clarke at the BBC, Volume 2: Disruption (1978-1989), out this week1982 archive article: Nancy Banks-Smith’s
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

BFI Review – Contact (1985) and Elephant (1989)

Contact, 1985 and Elephant, 1989.

Directed by Alan Clarke.

Synopsis:

Two films reflecting on the 1980’s in Northern Ireland.

Alan Clarke, director of Scum and The Firm, is a director of men. These could be men in prisons or aggressive, violent offenders keen to tattoo swastikas on their foreheads, as he did in Made in Britain. The BFI, in their retrospective of Clarkes’ films this month exhibited a double bill showcasing two films that revel in the conflict of male dominance in very different ways. They share the setting of Northern Ireland, but with perspectives of two striking definitions of warfare.

Contact, directed by Clarke in 1985, is a thoughtful observation on the military in rural Northern Ireland, near Dundalk (we can assume from the few moments of conversation made). A team is based in a small, cramp accommodation and the Platoon Commander (Sean Chapman) has a room that could barely be a back cupboard.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Most Influential British Director You’ve Never Heard Of

This week Neil Calloway looks at the career of an overlooked director…

Imagine a director who gave early roles to Ray Winstone, Tim Roth and Gary Oldman, who had a film remade by Gus Van Sant, who gave Danny Boyle one of his first producing credits, and who inspired Paul Greengrass.

Alan Clarke was that director, and though he has gone sadly underappreciated, a new season of his films at the British Film Institute, as well as a re-release of his work on blu-ray and DVD, should go some way to restoring his reputation.

Clarke worked largely in television, making the sort of standalone films that gave Mike Leigh and Ken Loach their breaks but are sadly absent from TV nowadays. His films dealt with glue sniffing Neo Nazis, yuppies, football hooligans and the futile cycle of sectarian violence in Northern Ireland; in short, these weren’t the big screen
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Blu-ray Review – The Gunman (2015)

The Gunman, 2015.

Directed by Pierre Morel.

Starring Sean Penn, Idris Elba, Javier Bardem, Ray Winstone, Jasmine Trinca, Mark Rylance and Peter Franzen.

Synopsis:

Eight years after a hit on the Congo mining minister, the assassin finds that he is now the target in a game of cat and mouse.

Spurred on by the inexplicable success of Taken (seriously? Watch it again – it isn’t That good), its sequels and the subsequent fad of middle-aged actors starring in revenge thrillers, Sean Penn (Carlito’s Way/Casualties of War) has joined the likes of Liam Neeson, Kevin Costner and Denzel Washington by starring in The Gunman, directed – funnily enough – by Taken director Pierre Morel.

Penn plays Jim Terrier, a sniper who has been selected to be the shooter in the assassination of the mining minister in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. After the hit Jim has to leave the continent as
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Why Alan Clarke is the key British film-maker whose maverick spirit lives on

The director of Scum, Made in Britain and The Firm made films that were brilliant, disconcerting and radical – and set the template for others to follow

I’ve been thinking about Alan Clarke recently. That’s not unusual: he’s a director I love, and his glorious, bristling films mean a lot to me. So it was his name that I first came up with when I started work on six short videos about the mavericks of British film. Maverick is a tricky word to parse, but if it meant anything at all, then Clarke – off on his own path, sparring with authority – has to be the benchmark.

Although we start in 1964 with Peter Watkins’s Culloden, four of the subjects are still alive and making films. All the same, it was hard not to feel a pang while we worked, and Clarke was why. Part of that was simply
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Blood And Carpet Brings Back British Black and White b-movies

Shot over 2 weeks in London and the South Coast, Blood And Carpet is a 1960’s influenced, kitchen sink, comedy thriller. Directed by Graham Fletcher-Cook and starring Annie Burkin (Zebra Crossing), Billy Wright (Betsy And Leonard) and Frank Boyce (Tony) it features supporting roles from Nicola Stapleton (EastEnders, The Rise Of The Krays) Julian Firth (Scum) and Andrew Tiernan (300, The Pianist). !

London 1967 and Ruby and Lyle have a problem. A … Continue reading →

Horrornews.net
See full article at Horror News »

Pendas Fen: a lasting vision of heresy and pastoral horror

Following in the footsteps of The Wicker Man, David Rudkins 1974 TV play offers a powerful portrait of adolescence and religious anguish in rural England

I am afflicted by images, by things that are seen, pictures of things, dramatist and screenwriter David Rudkin told an interviewer in 1964. They are extraordinary, momentary, but they stay with me. He was talking about his play Afore Night Come (1962), which led Kenneth Tynan to proclaim: Not since Look Back in Anger has a playwright made a debut more striking than this. But its also true of Pendas Fen, an unforgettable hybrid of horror story, rites-ofpassage spiritual quest and vision of an alternative England that has been hailed as one of the most original and vauntingly ambitious British films of the last half century.

Originally broadcast in 1974 as part of the BBCs Play for Today strand, and directed by Alan Clarke, who would later become celebrated
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Ray Winstone’s BAFTA Talk On Tough Guys, ‘Noah’ & Working With Scorsese

  • Deadline
Ray Winstone’s BAFTA Talk On Tough Guys, ‘Noah’ & Working With Scorsese
BAFTA’s latest Life In Pictures conversation featured British screen icon Ray Winstone, who proved a big draw despite the unseasonably warm October afternoon. With no new title to stump for (although he did mention his upcoming childhood-focused autobiography Young Winstone), the veteran instead entertained the crowd with a freewheeling look at his four-decade-long career, which includes prominent roles in films such as Noah, The Departed, and Indiana Jones And The Kingdom Of The Crystal Skull.

While he had plenty of quips about his adventures in Hollywood – including an uncanny Martin Scorsese impression – Winstone spoke passionately about his work in British cinema.

Famous for playing East End tough guys – “My wife asked me why I always walk in a room looking like I’m going to kill someone” – Winstone waxed lyrical about Gary Oldman’s work directing him in the gritty 1997 drama Nil By Mouth.

That film unflinchingly looks at
See full article at Deadline »
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