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They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?

One of the best pictures to come out of Hollywood in the late 1960s, Sydney Pollack’s screen version of Horace McCoy’s hardboiled novel is a harrowing experience guaranteed to elicit extreme responses. Jane Fonda performs (!) at the top of an ensemble of stars suffering in a Depression-Era circle of Hell – it’s an Annihilating Drama with a high polish. And this CineSavant review ends with a fact-bomb that ought to start Barbara Steele fans off on a new vault search.

They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1969 / Color / 2:35 widescreen 1:37 flat Academy / 120 min. / Street Date September 5, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Jane Fonda, Michael Sarrazin, Susannah York, Gig Young, Red Buttons, Bonnie Bedelia, Bruce Dern, Allyn Ann McLerie.

Cinematography: Philip H. Lathrop

Production Designer: Harry Horner

Film Editor: Fredric Steinkamp

Written by James Poe, Robert E. Thompson from the novel They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

9th Annual Governors Awards Recipients Announced – Charles Burnett, Owen Roizman, Donald Sutherland And Agnès Varda

The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted Tuesday night (September 5) to present Honorary Awards to writer-director Charles Burnett, cinematographer Owen Roizman, actor Donald Sutherland and director Agnès Varda. The four Oscar® statuettes will be presented at the Academy’s 9th Annual Governors Awards on Saturday, November 11, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center.

“This year’s Governors Awards reflect the breadth of international, independent and mainstream filmmaking, and are tributes to four great artists whose work embodies the diversity of our shared humanity,” said Academy President John Bailey.

Born in Mississippi and raised in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, Burnett is an independent filmmaker whose work has been praised for its portrayal of the African-American experience. He wrote, directed, produced, photographed and edited his first feature film, “Killer of Sheep,” in 1977. His other features include “My Brother’s Wedding,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Academy Announces Honorary Oscars, Reflecting Diversity: Agnes Varda, Charles Burnett, and More

Academy Announces Honorary Oscars, Reflecting Diversity: Agnes Varda, Charles Burnett, and More
The annual honorary Governors Awards are when Oscar lobbyists see the first results of the season, and this batch is notable for its global diversity: a Belgian woman filmmaker, a Canadian movie star, and an African-American director. The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted September 5, and they go to actor Donald Sutherland, writer-director Agnes Varda, and American independent filmmaker Charles Burnett and cinematographer Owen Roizman.

The statues will be presented November 11 at the 9th annual Governors Awards ceremony at Hollywood & Highland.

“This year’s Governors Awards reflect the breadth of international, independent and mainstream filmmaking, and are tributes to four great artists whose work embodies the diversity of our shared humanity,” said Academy president John Bailey.

Read More:New Academy President John Bailey is Willing to Ask if Movies Need Theaters For Oscar Qualification, and Other Radical Ideas

Never nominated for an Oscar, Canadian-born
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Academy Announces Honorary Oscars, Reflecting Diversity: Agnes Varda, Charles Burnett, and More

  • Indiewire
Academy Announces Honorary Oscars, Reflecting Diversity: Agnes Varda, Charles Burnett, and More
The annual honorary Governors Awards are when Oscar lobbyists see the first results of the season, and this batch is notable for its global diversity: a Belgian woman filmmaker, a Canadian movie star, and an African-American director. The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted September 5, and they go to actor Donald Sutherland, writer-director Agnes Varda, and American independent filmmaker Charles Burnett and cinematographer Owen Roizman.

The statues will be presented November 11 at the 9th annualGovernors Awards ceremony at Hollywood & Highland.

“This year’s Governors Awards reflect the breadth of international, independent and mainstream filmmaking, and are tributes to four great artists whose work embodies the diversity of our shared humanity,” said Academy president John Bailey.

Read More:New Academy President John Bailey is Willing to Ask if Movies Need Theaters For Oscar Qualification, and Other Radical Ideas

Canadian-born Sutherland began his career — boasting more
See full article at Indiewire »

Quad Cinema Will Relaunch with Films from Yang, Rivette, Kubrick, Fassbinder, Wertmüller, Coppola & More

Next month will mark the return of New York City’s Quad Cinema, a theater reshaped and rebranded as a proper theater via the resources of Charles S. Cohen, head of the distribution outfit Cohen Media Group. While we got a few hints of the line-up during the initial announcement, they’ve now unveiled their first full repertory calendar, running from April 14th through May 4th, and it’s an embarassment of cinematic riches.

Including the previously revealed Lina Wertmüller retrospective, one inventive series that catches our eye is First Encounters, in which an artist will get to experience a film they’ve always wanted to see, but never have, and in which you’re invited to take part. The first match-ups in the series include Kenneth Lonergan‘s first viewing Edward Yang‘s Yi Yi, Noah Baumbach‘s first viewing of Withnail and I, John Turturro‘s first viewing of Pather Panchali,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Review: Always Shine, an Intensely Personal and Satisfying Genre Picture

Director Sophia Takal more than fulfills the considerable promise of her debut Green with her second feature, a film that often looks, acts and feels like a thriller/horror flick, but at its heart is a dramatic treatise on the tyranny of the male gaze, and how the Hollywood dream factory enables and perpetuates it. In cinematic terms, it's Persona meets The Shining meets Mulholland Drive meets Single White Female. In literary terms, it's The Day of the Locust meets The Feminine Mystique. However, despite her film’s clearly discernible antecedents, Takal comes strongly through with a voice and a style all her own, one that combines creeping dread and flashes of overt violence with a finely pitched touch of barbed satire aimed at the conventions...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

On a Clear Day You Can See Anniversaries Forever

On this day in showbiz history...

1886 Spring Byington is born in Colorado Springs. Goes on to supporting actress glory in Hollywood including Marmee in Little Women (1933, her feature debut) and an Oscar nomination as the eccentric hobbyist mom in You Can't Take It With You (1938). Curiously her screen daughter in that best picture winner Jean Arthur, an even bigger star, shares her same birthday (for the year of 1900)

1888 Thomas Edison files a patent for the Optical Phonograph (an early step in creating the cinema)

1903 Author and screenwriter Nathanael West is born in NYC. Movies adapted from his work include Lonelyhearts (1958) and The Day of the Locust (1975)

1915 One of the world's most celebrated playwrights, Arthur Miller, is born. His classics include Death of a Salesman, The Crucible and A View From the Bridge. After marrying movie star Marilyn Monroe, he wrote The Misfits (1961) for her which would eerily (considering its elegiac
See full article at FilmExperience »

Missing From Movies: William Atherton’s Dick

Some actors were just born to be typecast.

“This man has no dick.” And neither do the movies anymore.

If you’re going to write a part specifically for William Atherton, it’s probably going to be inspired by his three most famous roles. That was clearly the case when he was cast for an episode of the TV series Lost, in which he plays a slimy high school principal character who was conceived with him in mind. It was a throwback to the assholes he embodied in Ghostbusters, Real Genius, and the first two Die Hard movies. Another one of his dicks.

Unfortunately, there aren’t enough people writing dick parts specifically for Atherton to play on the big screen. It’s been 20 years since his last (slightly) memorable movie continuation of the type, in Bio-Dome, and many of his fans probably aren’t even aware that he’s still alive and working regularly. Mostly
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Tribeca 2016 Review: Always Shine, In Which The Hollywood Dream Factory Becomes A Nightmare

Director Sophia Takal more than fulfills the considerable promise of her debut Green with her second feature, a film that often looks, acts and feels like a thriller/horror flick, but at its heart is a dramatic treatise on the tyranny of the male gaze, and how the Hollywood dream factory enables and perpetuates it. In cinematic terms, it's Persona meets The Shining meets Mulholland Drive meets Single White Female. In literary terms, it's The Day of the Locust meets The Feminine Mystique. However, despite her film’s clearly discernible antecedents, Takal comes strongly through with a voice and a style all her own, one that combines creeping dread and flashes of overt violence with a finely pitched touch of barbed satire aimed at the conventions...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Tribeca 2016 Review: Always Shine, In Which the Hollywood Dream Factory Becomes A Nightmare

Director Sophia Takal more than fulfills the considerable promise of her debut Green with her second feature, a film that often looks, acts and feels like a thriller/horror flick, but at its heart is a dramatic treatise on the tyranny of the male gaze, and how the Hollywood dream factory enables and perpetuates it. In cinematic terms, it's Persona meets The Shining meets Mulholland Drive meets Single White Female. In literary terms, it's The Day of the Locust meets The Feminine Mystique. However, despite her film’s clearly discernible antecedents, Takal comes strongly through with a voice and a style all her own, one that combines creeping dread and flashes of overt violence with a finely pitched touch of barbed satire aimed at the conventions...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Jim Clark, Oscar-Winning Editor of ‘The Killing Fields,’ Dies at 84

Jim Clark, who won an Oscar for editing Roland Joffé’s “The Killing Fields” and was also nominated for his work on the director’s film “The Mission,” died in the U.K. on Feb. 25. He was 84 and had been ill for some time.

News of his death was announced by the Guild of British Film and TV Editors on Feb. 26.

His credits also include Stanley Donen’s “Charade” (1963); John Schlesinger’s “Darling” (1965), “The Day of the Locust” (1975) and “Marathon Man” (1976); Michael Apted’s “Agatha” (1979), “Nell” (1994) and Bond film “The World Is Not Enough”; Michael Caton-Jones’ “Memphis Belle” (1990) and “City by the Sea” (2002); and Mike Leigh’s “Vera Drake” (2004) and “Happy-Go-Lucky” (2008).

In addition to the Schlesinger films listed above, he did uncredited work on the director’s “Far From the Madding Crowd” and served as a creative consultant on the helmer’s 1969 classic “Midnight Cowboy.”

Clark received the American Cinema
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Secretly Scary: 1975’s The Day Of The Locust

Lee Gambin’s “Secretly Scary” column continues to look at non-horror films that are secretly horror films! “Jeepers Creepers, where’d you get those peepers? Jeepers Creepers, where’d you get those eyes?”– Adore (Jackie Hayley) and Faye Greener (Karen Black) There’s a line in Mart Crowley’s controversial play The Boys In The Band belonging to the protagonist…

The post Secretly Scary: 1975’s The Day Of The Locust appeared first on Shock Till You Drop.
See full article at shocktillyoudrop »

Best Films of 2015 so far (part 2)

Picking the best movies that come out in any given year is no easy feat. With over 800 movies released theatrically, there’s plenty to digest. As we reach the halfway point of the year, we decided to publish a list of our favourite movies thus far, in hopes that our readers can catch up on some of the films they might have missed out on. Below, you shall find the list of the top 30 films of 2015 to date, a list that ranges from independent horror films to documentary to foreign films and so much more. Here’s is part two of our three part list.

****

20. The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared

Eccentrically layered yet simple in plot, the Swedish adaptation of Jonas Jonasson’s novel does a fine job in balancing satire with tenderness. Telling the story of Allan Karlsson (Robert Gustafsson), a 100-year-old explosive enthusiast
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Timeless style by Anne-Katrin Titze

Beastie Boy Adam Horovitz, Amanda Seyfried and Ben Stiller with While We're Young director Noah Baumbach, also starring Naomi Watts and Adam Driver with Charles Grodin, Maria Dizzia and Dree Hemingway Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Noah Baumbach says Academy Award Best Costume Design winner Ann Roth "has a way of dressing people - that you can't put your finger on." Roth won for Anthony Minghella's The English Patient, starring Ralph Fiennes, Juliette Binoche, Willem Dafoe and Kristin Scott Thomas and is a BAFTA honoree for John Schlesinger's The Day Of The Locust, which starred Donald Sutherland, Karen Black and Burgess Meredith. Roth also received Oscar nominations for her work on Robert Benton's Places In The Heart and again with Minghella for The Talented Mr. Ripley.

Noah's 2012 film, Frances Ha, with Greta Gerwig, Mickey Sumner and Adam Driver, had no costume designer credit, although Sumner's godmother is famed costume designer Colleen Atwood.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

September 30th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Leprechaun, Killer Fish

  • DailyDead
For the final week of September, we’ll be seeing a handful of indie genre titles coming our way to DVD and Blu-ray, as well as several cult classics, including the original Leprechaun films, finally making their high-def debut on Tuesday.

In terms of new indie movies to keep an eye out for, Grow-up Tony Phillips, the latest from up-and-coming Austin filmmaker Emily Hagins (My Sucky Teen Romance), is being released as well as American Muscle, The Paranormal Diaries, Grave Halloween and the pregnancy-themed horror flick Delivery: The Beast Within. For those of you horror fans looking for something a bit more ‘seasoned’, both Krull and Killer Fish are getting their Blu-ray treatment this week and should make for excellent additions to your home entertainment collection.

Spotlight Titles:

Grow-up Tony Phillips (Anderson Digital, DVD)

Who doesn’t love Halloween? All of Tony Phillips’ high school friends do, apparently. It’s
See full article at DailyDead »

“Hey, Glad You Won But…”: Top 10 Nominees Deprived of Oscar Gold in Favor of Another Contender

The knock on the Academy Awards throughout the years always seem to be how certain actors, directors and films are snubbed in favor of other chosen nominations. Sometimes the justification for these overlooked selections in performances and motion pictures are warranted. Many will agree that a lot of injustices have been committed based on how some Oscar-worthy selections were slighted.

Has anyone ever considered the equal possibilities of omission when one Oscar nominee wins the golden statuette over another nominee that one thought was more deserving for the victory? There have been numerous instances when observers who have witnessed an Oscar win thought that their competitor should have received it instead. It is only human nature to have an opinion as to feel who should have claimed Oscar gold as opposed to the fellow nominee that actually accomplished the goal.

Let us look at the top ten instances where it
See full article at SoundOnSight »

This Is the 'Midnight Cowboy' Legacy, From A to Z

It's a shock to go back and watch "Midnight Cowboy" 45 years after its debut (on May 25, 1969) and see how raw and otherworldly it looks. After all, the X-rated Best Picture Oscar-winner has been so thoroughly assimilated into American pop culture that even kiddie entertainments like the Muppets have copied from it.

The tale of the unlikely friendship between naïve Texas gigolo Joe Buck (Jon Voight) and frail Bronx con man Enrico "Ratso" Rizzo (Dustin Hoffman), "Midnight Cowboy" was initially considered so risqué that it's the only X-rated movie ever to win the Academy's top prize (though after it won, the ratings board reconsidered and gave the film an R). Still, the film featured two lead performances and a few individual scenes that were so iconic that homages (and parodies) have popped up virtually everywhere. (Most often imitated is the scene where Ratso, limping across a busy Manhattan street, is nearly
See full article at Moviefone »

Fearnet Movie Review: 'Starry Eyes' [SXSW 2014]

  • FEARnet
Fearnet Movie Review: 'Starry Eyes' [SXSW 2014]
There are plenty of (usually independently produced) movies that take firm aim on the "eat 'em up and spit 'em out" nature of Hollywood. (My favorites are Swimming with Sharks, Living in Oblivion, The Player, and The Day of the Locust.) But while those films are satirical and often very funny deconstructions of The Hollywood Machine, the new indie horror film Starry Eyes is sort of a kick-straight-to-the nuts of the film industry.   You could probably figure out the plot of Starry Eyes if I described the film as "Faust in lower-middle class Los Angeles," but we can get just a little more specific than that: Sarah (Alexandra Essoe) is a sweet but emotionally fragile young ingenue who, like virtually everyone in Hollywood under the age of 30, dreams of being a movie star. More specifically, old-school '40s-era Hollywood stardom is what Sarah is looking for. Unfortunately the only production
See full article at FEARnet »

Donald Sutherland: 'I want Hunger Games to stir up a revolution'

Donald Sutherland: 'I want Hunger Games to stir up a revolution'
The veteran actor who plays tyrannical president Coriolanus Snow in the blockbuster series talks about films as political activism – plus cinema villains and happy marriages

Donald Sutherland wants to stir revolt. A real revolt. A youth-led uprising against injustice that will overturn the Us as we know it and usher in a kinder, better way. "I hope that they will take action because it's getting drastic in this country." Drone strikes. Corporate tax dodging. Racism. The Keystone oil pipeline. Denying food stamps to "starving Americans". It's all going to pot. "It's not right. It's not right."

Millennials need awakening from slumber. "You know the young people of this society have not moved in the last 30 years." With the exception of Occupy, a minority movement, passivity reigns. "They have been consumed with telephones." The voice hardens. "Tweeting."

We are high up in a Four Seasons hotel overlooking Beverly Hills, sunlight glinting off mansions and boutiques below,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Hollywood struggles to halt an exodus of film-makers

The world's entertainment capital is losing out as studios switch big TV and film productions to other locations to save money, leaving studios as little more than grand tourist attractions

Among the tourist hordes on the "walk of fame" last week, you could feel Hollywood casting its spell. They genuflected at the names of actors and film-makers embedded in pink stars in the pavement. Gloria Swanson. John Wayne. Will Smith. Francis Ford Coppola. Quentin Tarantino. Generations of glamour and talent, ringed in brass and close enough to touch.

Open-air vans and double-decker buses packed with camera-toting passengers swayed past palm trees and the Chinese Theatre en route to celebrity home tours – which are in truth celebrity hedge tours, because you seldom glimpse the mansions behind the shrubbery. No matter, the tours are extremely popular: there are now about 40 operators, up from just a handful a few years ago.

With an azure sky and balmy sunshine,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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