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John Powell interview: scoring Bourne, Hans Zimmer, Face/Off and more

Sean Wilson Jul 6, 2017

Composer John Powell chats to us about scoring Jason Bourne, working with John Woo, his upcoming work and more.

Few contemporary film composers have made an impact quite like John Powell. From animation to drama to his immediately influential, propulsive Bourne soundtracks, Powell's energetic, emotional and heartfelt blend of symphony orchestra, electronics and percussion make him a singular voice.

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Ahead of his BAFTA Screen Talks event at the Royal Albert Hall on 10th July, we were delighted to catch up with John to discuss his remarkable career and the secret to a truly great film score.

So 10 years after I saw The Bourne Ultimatum on the big screen and being electrified by your score I'm sat here talking to you, which is a real privilege. I wondered was there a particular film score that inspired you to become a film composer?
See full article at Den of Geek »

Name Composers Not Above Getting the Boot

Name Composers Not Above Getting the Boot
There was a brief stir in January when composer Harry Gregson-Williams publicly expressed, via Facebook, his surprise at hearing music he didn’t recognize at the premiere of Michael Mann’s thriller “Blackhat” — and at not hearing a lot of score he did write.

The composer says his Facebook post has been blown out of proportion, but admits it was disappointing to see music he toiled over dropped (or replaced) in the final cut. But, he stresses, that’s just part of the game.

“You win some, you lose some,” he says, relaying his early mentor Hans Zimmer’s comment that you haven’t made it as a film composer until you’ve had a score rejected.

Gregson-Williams is simply the latest in a long line of composers who’ve watched scores tossed out and replaced whole-cloth, partially substituted by pre-existing tracks, or mangled beyond recognition. Mann is notorious for
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Stanley Rubin, Writer-Producer of TV, Film, Dies at 96

Stanley Rubin, Writer-Producer of TV, Film, Dies at 96
Writer-producer Stanley Rubin, whose wide range of credits included classic film noir “The Narrow Margin,” Marilyn Monroe-Robert Mitchum Western “River of No Return,” TV series “The Ghost and Mrs. Muir” and Clint Eastwood’s 1990 feature “White Hunter Black Heart,” died Sunday at his home above the Sunset Strip. He was 96.

Rubin was also a leader at the Writers Guild and Producers Guild. He negotiated contracts for the former and served the latter as president for five years.

Rubin wrote 19 feature films and produced more than 25 in a career that spanned seven decades. But frustration with the film business also led him to television in that medium’s early stages — “The idea of getting into something on the ground floor — not just as a writer but perhaps as a producer — excited me with visions of control and ownership,” Rubin wrote in an essay much later.

He won an Emmy
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Stanley Rubin, Writer-Producer of TV, Film, Dies at 96

Stanley Rubin, Writer-Producer of TV, Film, Dies at 96
Writer-producer Stanley Rubin, whose wide range of credits included classic film noir “The Narrow Margin,” Marilyn Monroe-Robert Mitchum Western “River of No Return,” TV series “The Ghost and Mrs. Muir” and Clint Eastwood’s 1990 feature “White Hunter Black Heart,” died Sunday at his home above the Sunset Strip. He was 96.

Rubin was also a leader at the Writers Guild and Producers Guild. He negotiated contracts for the former and served the latter as president for five years.

Rubin wrote 19 feature films and produced more than 25 in a career that spanned seven decades. But frustration with the film business also led him to television in that medium’s early stages — “The idea of getting into something on the ground floor — not just as a writer but perhaps as a producer — excited me with visions of control and ownership,” Rubin wrote in an essay much later.

He won an Emmy
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Alex Karras obituary

Actor, wrestler and American football star whose hardman roles included Mongo in Blazing Saddles

In Mel Brooks's 1974 film Blazing Saddles, the enforcer Mongo rides into town on a Brahma bull, and knocks out a horse with one punch. "Don't shoot him, it will just make him mad," the townspeople advise Sheriff Bart. Later, Bart asks Mongo about the things he's done. Looking up with puppy eyes, the hulking villain says: "Mongo only pawn in game of life."

Alex Karras, who has died aged 77, was a natural to play Mongo, with his larger-than-life body and rubbery face, which he could contort in exaggerated clowning, or soften to suggest his slyly sympathetic wit. Some of those skills he learned as a professional wrestler, and even as a novice actor he stole scenes from comedians as talented as Cleavon Little or Gene Wilder. Karras went on to have a successful career as a character actor,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Alex Karras, Former Detroit Lion and Star of Webster, Dies at 77

  • PEOPLE.com
Alex Karras, Former Detroit Lion and Star of Webster, Dies at 77
Webster star Alex Karras, who began his career as a football hero for the Detroit Lions, has died, the Associated Press reports. He was 77. Karras, who was suffering from kidney failure, died at home in Los Angeles surrounded by family members, including his wife, Susan Clark, the Canadian actress who also played his fictional wife on Webster, said Karras's attorney, Craig Mitnick Lions president Tom Lewand released the following statement upon learning of Karras's deteriorating health: "The entire Detroit Lions family is deeply saddened to learn of the news regarding the condition of one of our all-time greats, Alex Karras.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

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