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Drive-In Dust Offs: Q: The Winged Serpent (1982)

  • DailyDead
Larry Cohen: Party of One. That’s the way I see him, anyway; he’s always made the films he’s wanted, the way he’s wanted – with varying results, sure, but at the end of the day they are nothing less than Larry Cohen Films: unique, challenging, quirky, funny, and almost always a blast to watch. Which brings us to Q: The Winged Serpent (1982), his tribute to the Aip monster movies of days gone by, overshadowed by his patented blend of offbeat characters and intriguing dialogue. The flying lizard? Merely a delightful distraction.

Released by United Film Distribution Company (and co-produced by legendary Aip honcho Samuel Z. Arkoff) in late October, Q returned only a quarter of its $1.2 million budget, but reviews were fairly kind, with most critics singling out not the movie itself, per se, but a wonderful turn by Michael Moriarty (A Return to Salem’s
See full article at DailyDead »

Alfonso Cuarón and Casey Affleck Coming to Television For Cult Horror Drama

  • Indiewire
Alfonso Cuarón and Casey Affleck are joining forces for what is bound to be one of the hottest new television series in development. Deadline reports the two Oscar winners are developing an untitled horror television series that will track the origins of a cult. The project is being developed under Anonymous Content, the production company behind “Mr. Robot,” and is being shipped around to pay cable and streaming outlets. Multiple networks are reportedly interested.

Read More:Alfonso Cuarón Says ‘The Shape of Water’ is ‘Amazingly Sublime,’ Teases Why ‘Roma’ is Taking So Long

Cuarón is writing, directing and executive producing the project. He won the Best Director Oscar for “Gravity” and last came to television as the co-creator and executive producer of the short-lived NBC drama series “Believe.” The director is currently in post-production on “Roma,” his first Mexican production since “Y Tu Mama Tambien,” which is set for a
See full article at Indiewire »

Alfonso Cuarón and Casey Affleck Coming to Television For Cult Horror Drama

Alfonso Cuarón and Casey Affleck are joining forces for what is bound to be one of the hottest new television series in development. Deadline reports the two Oscar winners are developing an untitled horror television series that will track the origins of a cult. The project is being developed under Anonymous Content, the production company behind “Mr. Robot,” and is being shipped around to pay cable and streaming outlets. Multiple networks are reportedly interested.

Read More:Alfonso Cuarón Says ‘The Shape of Water’ is ‘Amazingly Sublime,’ Teases Why ‘Roma’ is Taking So Long

Cuarón is writing, directing and executive producing the project. He won the Best Director Oscar for “Gravity” and last came to television as the co-creator and executive producer of the short-lived NBC drama series “Believe.” The director is currently in post-production on “Roma,” his first Mexican production since “Y Tu Mama Tambien,” which is set for a
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Sentinel (1977)

  • DailyDead
In regards to his filmic output, director Michael Winner was wildly inconsistent at his worst and wholly divisive at his best (and vice versa). The remarkable thing is that those two extreme opinions can be about the same film; some find the kinetic sleaze of Death Wish (1974) powerful and disturbing, others find its ham-fisted social grazing problematic and off-putting. But it was a big hit, so naturally Universal let him ride the satanic tide with The Sentinel (1977), a Good vs. Evil, Portal to Hell potboiler that warms this Fulci-loving heart three years before Lucio even set foot in New Orleans.

Given a limited release in January stateside, The Sentinel barely broke even on its $4 million budget, and the critics hated it, deeming it lurid, reprehensible trash. Which it is; but it’s also ridiculously entertaining and has a few truly haunting moments. Turns out Winner could do horror—and yet
See full article at DailyDead »

Review: “Bobbie Jo And The Outlaw” (1976) Starring Marjoe Gortner, Lynda Carter And Jesse Vint; Kino Lorber Blu-ray

  • CinemaRetro
By Ernie Magnotta

There’s nothing I like better than getting hold of a movie that I’ve been searching over three decades for and adding it to my collection. At my age, there aren’t many vintage films left that I don’t own in one format or another, so when I heard that the 1976 cult classic Bobbie Jo and the Outlaw was getting a Blu-ray release, I was quite enthused. This movie has somehow always managed to elude me. It never seemed to play on any of my cable stations in the early 80s, we never had a copy of it at the video store I worked at in the mid-80s and I was still never able to find a copy of it anywhere throughout the 90s. To be honest, by the time the 21st century hit, I completely forgotten about this movie, so I was pretty
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Best Of The Best – The Greatest Composers And The Scores That Made Them Great

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Dave Roper

With Actors, Directors, Actresses and Screenwriters under our collective belt and Cinematographers still to come, we presently turn our eye towards Composers, whose music lends so much to the films they work on.

As with the other lists, credit is given for not merely one or two sterling scores, but rather a consistently excellent body of work with specific stand-out films. To be blunt, this is a trickier prospect than it at first appears. Just because a film is terrific or well-loved doesn’t necessarily mean that the score is itself a standout. We begin with perhaps the most obvious and celebrated film composer of them all…..

John WilliamsStar Wars

Goodness me. The Poseidon Adventure, The Towering Inferno, Earthquake, Jaws, Raiders of the Lost Ark, The Long Goodbye, Catch Me If You Can, Star Wars, Close Encounters, Star Wars, Superman, Et, Born on the Fourth of July,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Food Of The Gods (1976)

  • DailyDead
Sometimes in horror, a giant creature will do. It takes us back to a simpler time, I think. A time when an oversized spider, or a massive lizard sparked shuttered eyes at the Drive-In or local theatre. It feels almost like a cleansing; a reset of the scare-o-meter back to the innocent levels of the Saturday matinee. And if you were a kid in the ‘70s, Bert I. Gordon’s The Food of the Gods (1976) fit the bill nicely.

Released in June by Aip stateside, and then rolled out across the world in ’77, Food brought in $1 million at the gate (good revenue by Aip standards) and the reviews were, not surprisingly, as low grade as the budget. But hey, legendary schlockmeister Gordon did not survive the biz on good copy. And what kind of reviews would you expect from a movie that features giant chickens, gargantuan rats, and Marjoe Gortner?
See full article at DailyDead »

Rollercoaster

A mad extortionist is blowing up rollercoaster rides. Put-upon George Segal must stop him because we all know that the time, the tide and roller coasters wait for no man. Producer Jennings Lang's by-the-numbers suspense thriller is light on suspense and thrills, but the cast is good and the screenplay at least partly intelligent. And hey -- it's got a teenage Helen Hunt! Rollercoaster Blu-ray Shout! Factory 1977 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 119 min. / Street Date June 21, 2016 / 19.99 Starring George Segal, Timothy Bottoms, Henry Fonda, Helen Hunt, Harry Guardino, Susan Strasberg, Craig Wasson, Robert Quarry, Quinn Redeker, Dick Wesson, Gary Franklin, Steve Guttenberg. Cinematography David M. Walsh Original Music Lalo Schifrin Written by Richard Levinson, William Link, Tommy Cook Produced by Jennings Lang Directed by James Goldstone

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Jaws inspired plenty of rip-off movies about sharks, bears, killer whales and monster octopi threatening beaches. Since it wasn't safe to go back to the water,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Review: "Number One" (1969) Starring Charlton Heston; MGM DVD Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Charlton Heston fans will appreciate the fact that one of his few major films not to be released on home video has finally made it to DVD through MGM. "Number One" (released in certain countries under the title "Pro") is an off-beat vehicle for the superstar, who was then at his peak of popularity. The fact that the movie under-performed at the box-office and failed to score with critics didn't diminish Heston's status as a leading man. He would go on to star in such hits as "The Omega Man", "Skyjacked", "Soylent Green" "Earthquake", "Midway"and "Airport '75"- with cameos in the popular "The Three Musketeers" and "The Four Musketeers". The poor response to "Number One" doesn't diminish its many merits - and the fact that Heston was willing to play against type in a largely unsympathetic role. For the film, he reunited with director Tom Gries,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Tough-Guy Actor George Kennedy Dead at 91

  • Moviefone
By Lindsey Bahr, AP Film Writer

Los Angeles (AP) -- George Kennedy, the hulking, tough-guy character actor who won an Academy Award for his portrayal of a savage chain-gang convict in the 1960s classic "Cool Hand Luke," has died.

His grandson Cory Schenkel says Kennedy died on Sunday morning of old age in Boise, Idaho. He was 91.

He had undergone emergency triple bypass surgery in 2002. That same year, he and his late wife moved to Idaho to be closer to their daughter and her family, though he still was involved in occasional film projects.

His biggest acting achievement came in "Cool Hand Luke," a 1967 film about a rebellious war hero played by Paul Newman who is bent on bucking the system as a prisoner on a Southern chain gang. Its theme of rebelling against authority and the establishment helped make it one of the most important films of the tumultuous 1960s.
See full article at Moviefone »

George Kennedy dies at 91 by Amber Wilkinson - 2016-02-29 22:47:40

Oscar winning star George Kennedy has died, aged 91.

His grandson Cory Schenkel reported the news on his Facebook page, saying of his grandfather - and gran, who died just over a year ago: "They both lived amazing lives and I know they are resting in peace."

A jobbing character actor right through the Sixties - with a particular emphasis on Westerns - he really made his mark when he won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his role alongside Paul Newman in Cool Hand Luke. After that, he went on to hold memorable roles in the likes of Thunderbolt And Lightfoot, Earthquake and the Airport franchise, and showed an aptitude for deadpan comedy in the Zucker Brothers' Naked Gun films.

The New York born also enjoyed a stint as Ewing family bête noire Carter McKay and his final film role was alongside Mark Wahlberg...
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

‘Airport’ Star George Kennedy Dies at 91

‘Airport’ Star George Kennedy Dies at 91
George Kennedy, who won a supporting actor Oscar for his role alongside Paul Newman in the beloved film “Cool Hand Luke,” and was also a fixture of 1970s disaster movies including the “Airport” franchise and “Earthquake,” died Sunday in Boise, Idaho. He was 91. His grandson Cory Schenkel reported the death on his Facebook page.

While Kennedy largely played gruff, blue-collar characters in dramas and genre films, he allowed a comedic side to emerge in the deadpan “The Naked Gun” movies.

Kennedy appeared in all four of the “Airport” movies of the 1970s as Joe Patroni, the reluctant, cigar-chomping but highly effective chief mechanic who could be counted upon when the chips were down and supreme expertise was required. He also turned in a powerful performance in 1975’s “Earthquake” as the hearty, sentimental police sergeant Slade, who helps where he can in the wake of the devastating temblor.

Kennedy toiled in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Airport’ Star George Kennedy Dies at 91

‘Airport’ Star George Kennedy Dies at 91
George Kennedy, who won a supporting actor Oscar for his role alongside Paul Newman in the beloved film “Cool Hand Luke,” and was also a fixture of 1970s disaster movies including the “Airport” franchise and “Earthquake,” died Sunday in Boise, Idaho. He was 91. His grandson Cory Schenkel reported the death on his Facebook page.

While Kennedy largely played gruff, blue-collar characters in dramas and genre films, he allowed a comedic side to emerge in the deadpan “The Naked Gun” movies.

Kennedy appeared in all four of the “Airport” movies of the 1970s as Joe Patroni, the reluctant, cigar-chomping but highly effective chief mechanic who could be counted upon when the chips were down and supreme expertise was required. He also turned in a powerful performance in 1975’s “Earthquake” as the hearty, sentimental police sergeant Slade, who helps where he can in the wake of the devastating temblor.

Kennedy toiled in
See full article at Variety - TV News »

'Naked Gun' Star George Kennedy Dead at 91

  • TMZ
George Kennedy, star of "Cool Hand Luke" and the 'Naked Gun' movies, has died at the age of 91 ... TMZ has learned. George's grandson Cory Schenkel says Kennedy died Sunday morning at 4:30 Am in Boise, ID. He says his grandfather had been in failing health ever since his wife Joan died a little over a year ago. George had been under hospice care for the past month. Kennedy won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar in 1968 for "Cool Hand Luke.
See full article at TMZ »

R.I.P. George Kennedy

  • Dark Horizons
George Kennedy has died, the actor passing away yesterday at the age of 91 according to a Facebook post from his grandson Cory Schenkel.

Kennedy mostly played gruff characters in various genres. He appeared in all four of the 1970s "Airport" films, he's known to a whole generation as Frank Drebin's boss Ed in "The Naked Gun" films, and he won an Oscar for co-starring with Paul Newman in "Cool Hand Luke".

Other notable film credits include the original "The Flight of the Phoenix" and the war time classic "The Dirty Dozen," the disaster epic "Earthquake," the Clint Eastwood mountain climbing spy thriller "The Eiger Sanction," westerns such as "Bandolero" and "The Sons of Katie Elder", the all-star Agatha Christie adaptation "Death on the Nile," Otto Preminger's post-Pearl Harbor tale "In Harm's Way," and Michael Ciminio's "Thunderbolt and Lightfoot".

He also had roles in TV series such as "Dallas, "Bonanza,
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Stuntwoman May Boss Dies: Doubled For Bette Davis, Rita Hayworth & Others

May Boss, a legendary stuntwoman who doubled for Bette Davis, Rita Hayworth, Doris Day and Dorothy Malone, has died. She was 90 and had been in declining health since suffering a stroke in 2008. Boss, whose stunt career spanned over 50 years, appeared in over 100 films and TV shows, including Mary Poppins, The Blues Brothers, Blazing Saddles, Earthquake, It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, Soylent Green, True Lies and Total Recall. Widely considered one of Hollywood's best…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Stuntwoman May Boss Dies: Doubled For Bette Davis, Rita Hayworth & Others

  • Deadline
May Boss, a legendary stuntwoman who doubled for Bette Davis, Rita Hayworth, Doris Day and Dorothy Malone, has died. She was 90 and had been in declining health since suffering a stroke in 2008. Boss, whose stunt career spanned over 50 years, appeared in over 100 films and TV shows, including Mary Poppins, The Blues Brothers, Blazing Saddles, Earthquake, It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, Soylent Green, True Lies and Total Recall. Widely considered one of Hollywood's best…
See full article at Deadline »

Trends in 70's Cinema: Disaster Movies

  • Cinelinx
Let’s face it, most of us have a soft spot for things blowing up in movies, and for a long time movies have been happy to feed our appetite for destruction. But it wasn’t always that way.

I know it’s hard to imagine, but there was a time when explosions weren’t so common in movies. Back then, big-budget movies had dancing and singing, and everyone had a merry time. After WWII though, things started to change. In newspapers and magazines, Americans were being exposed to terrible images of war-torn Europe and Japan. This imagery was haunting, yet it sparked some imaginations. At first, Hollywood was careful not to glamorize it. They figured out a way to show massive destruction and violence while making it fun and moderately profitable instead of soul-crushing and distasteful. The 50’s became known for its low-budget cheese-fests; sci-fi B movies featuring such
See full article at Cinelinx »

Monica Lewis, Actress, Singer, Dies at 93

Monica Lewis, a former Benny Goodman vocalist who headlined the very first broadcast of “The Ed Sullivan Show,” was the voice of the popular Chiquita Banana cartoons, clowned opposite Jerry Lewis, Red Skelton and Danny Kaye, and had co-starring roles in such films as “Earthquake,” “Airport 1975” and “The ConcordeAirport ’79,” died on June 12 of natural causes at her apartment in Woodland Hills, Calif. She was 93.

Lewis was born in Chicago to a musical family headed by her father Leon Lewis, who was a symphonic composer and conductor. Her mother Jessica sang with the Chicago Opera Company and her sister Barbara was an accomplished classical pianist. Her brother Marlo became head of variety for CBS-tv and created Ed Sullivan’s “Toast of the Town” show.

Monica studied voice with her mother from the time she was a toddler, but when the family lost everything during the Depression, they moved to New York to start over.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Monica Lewis, Actress Who Sang in Chiquita Banana Cartoons, Dies at 93

Monica Lewis, Actress Who Sang in Chiquita Banana Cartoons, Dies at 93
Monica Lewis, a former Benny Goodman vocalist who headlined the very first broadcast of “The Ed Sullivan Show,” was the voice of the popular Chiquita Banana cartoons, clowned opposite Jerry Lewis, Red Skelton and Danny Kaye, and had roles in such films as “Earthquake,” “Airport 1975” and “The ConcordeAirport ’79,” died on June 12 of natural causes at her apartment in Woodland Hills, Calif. She was 93.

Lewis was born in Chicago to a musical family. Her father Leon Lewis was a symphonic composer and conductor; her mother Jessica sang with the Chicago Opera Company and her sister Barbara was a classical pianist. Her brother Marlo became head of variety for CBS-tv and created Ed Sullivan’s “Toast of the Town” show.

Monica studied voice with her mother from the time she was a toddler, but when the family lost everything during the Depression, they moved to New York to start over.
See full article at Variety - TV News »
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