The Getaway (1972) - News Poster

(1972)

News

Charley Varrick (Region B)

It’s the loose-censored early 1970s, and screen bandits shootin’ up the American movie landscape are no longer suffering the once-mandated automatic moral retribution. Walter Matthau launched himself into the genre with this excellent Don Siegel on-the-run epic, about an old-fashioned independent bandit who accidentally rips off the mob for a million. It’s great, wicked fun.

Charley Varrick

Region B Blu-ray

Indicator

1973 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 111 min. / Charley Varrick the Last of the Independents; Kill Charley Varrick / Street Date January 22, 2018 / available from Powerhouse Films UK / £14.99

Starring: Walter Matthau, Joe Don Baker, Andrew Robinson, John Vernon, Felicia Farr, Sheree North, Jacqueline Scott, William Schallert, Norman Fell, Benson Fong, Woodrow Parfrey, Rudy Diaz, Charles Matthau, Tom Tully, Albert Popwell

Cinematography: Michael Butler

Film Editor: Frank Morriss

Original Music: Lalo Schifrin

Written by Dean Riesner, Howard Rodman from the novel The Looters by John Reese

Produced by Jennings Lang, Don Siegel

Directed by
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Crypt of Curiosities: Towns That Dreaded Sundown

  • DailyDead
In 1946, the sleepy Texas town of Texarkana was rocked by a string of eight violent assaults, five of them resulting in murder. These crimes were later dubbed the Texarkana Moonlight Murders, named after the late-night timing of the attacks, and the unknown perpetrator become known as the “Phantom Killer.” It was truly a horrific crime and it’s no surprise that it’s one that would attract exploitation filmmakers. Filmmakers like Texarkana resident Charles B. Pierce.

Charles B. Pierce was, in every way, a product of gonzo drive-in exploitation. In the early ’70s, he rocked the grindhouse world with The Legend of Boggy Creek (1972), an absurd docudrama about a killer Sasquatch tormenting a sleepy village in Arkansas. It was his first true hit, successful enough to spawn a wave of Sasquatch-ploitation (another topic for another time), and kick-start his career. He’d go on to make a few more films in the years that followed,
See full article at DailyDead »

Love with the Proper Stranger

What are two individualistic, highly motivated movie stars supposed to do when faced with an unimaginative studio system eager to misuse their talents? Natalie Wood and Steve McQueen collaborate with a great writer, director and producer for an urban romance with an eye on the sexual double standard. It’s a hybrid production: a gritty drama that’s also a calculated career move.

Love with the Proper Stranger

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1963 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 100 min. / Street Date September 19, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Natalie Wood, Steve McQueen, Edie Adams, Tom Bosley, Herschel Bernardi, Harvey Lembeck, Agusta Ciolli, Nina Varela, Marilyn Chris, Richard Dysart, Arlene Golonka, Tony Mordente, Nobu McCarthy, Richard Mulligan, Vic Tayback, Dyanne Thorne, Val Avery.

Cinematography: Milton Krasner

Film Editor: Aaron Stell

Original Music: Elmer Bernstein

Written by Arnold Schulman

Produced by Alan J. Pakula

Directed by Robert Mulligan

1963’s Love with the Proper Stranger is
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

1941: A Great Comedy For Slim Pickens Day

On Monday, August 28, 2017, Turner Classic Movies will devote an entire day of their “Summer Under the Stars” series to the late, great Louis Burton Lindley Jr. If that name doesn’t sound familiar, well, then just picture the fella riding the bomb like a buckin’ bronco at the end of Dr. Strangelove…, or the racist taskmaster heading up the railroad gang in Blazing Saddles, or the doomed Sheriff Baker, who gets one of the loveliest, most heartbreaking sendoffs in movie history in Sam Peckinpah’s Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid.

Lindley joined the rodeo circuit when he was 13 and soon picked up the name that would follow him throughout the length of his professional career, in rodeo and in movies & TV. One of the rodeo vets got a look at the lank newcomer and told him, “Slim pickin’s. That’s all you’re gonna get in this rodeo.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Baby Driver’ Review

Stars: Ansel Elgort, Lily James, Kevin Space, John Hamm, Jamie Foxx | Written and Directed by Edgar Wright

Edgar Wright’s return to American moviemaking is a more earnest and coherent foray than 2010’s Scott Pilgrim, and it’s a blast of pure positive energy after the relatively dour The World’s End. It opens with the eponymous Baby (Ansel Elgort) rocking in his car to The John Spencer Blues Explosion, and it never stops dancing.

Baby is a guy with a permanent Tony Manero swagger. He’s under the wing of gangster boss Doc (Kevin Spacey), who’s both a mentor and gaoler. But Baby has almost paid off his debt and he’s approaching the “one last job” cliché, after which he hopes to hit the road and leave his Atlanta life behind.

Then Baby meets a beautiful waitress, Debora (Lily James). They quickly fall in love. However, the freeway out of the crime world is not clear. Doc needs Baby for yet another last job, working alongside the hyper-macho Buddy (John Hamm) and his scheming girlfriend Darling (Eiza Gonzalez), and the batshit crazy Bats (Jamie Foxx).

Can Baby finish his getaway driver stint and find freedom and a future with Debora? Or is he on a road to oblivion?

Life is a playlist for Baby. A childhood accident left him with tinnitus, and now he drowns out the whining through the power of the iPod, wearing earbuds 23 hours a day and moving to the thrum of the music. (He even samples real-world conversations and mixes them into bad hip-hop.) Wright’s penchant for rhythmic editing has reached its natural zenith, and it’s exhilarating. The British auteur has compiled a soundtrack – and frankly a narrative brevity – of which Tarantino can only dream. And it’s not just the music but the sound design, which is astonishingly detailed and well-choreographed, whether it’s the percussive crack of gunfire, the sad ring of tinnitus, or the intimate singing of wine glasses.

The marketing may have overtones of classic car capers like Sam Peckinpah’s The Getaway or Walter Hill’s The Driver, but really Baby Driver is a mashup of the last few decades of modern action movies. It takes in the muscular physicality and mute cool of the ‘70s; the efficiency and the gaudy aesthetic of the ‘80s and ‘90s; and in its hero shaped by formative tragedy, even includes some of the comic book sensibility of the new century. It also feels like the greatest Grand Theft Auto movie never made. (If only Baby could learn from GTA that sometimes the best way to evade the cops is to stay still until the heat is off.)

Elgort is charming and tragic in a way that he totally wasn’t in The Fault in Our Stars, and he has a great chemistry with James, who pulls off blue collar Georgian with effortless aplomb. In supporting roles, Spacey brings gravitas and grades of grey to his deadpan mobster, while Foxx is genuinely funny and menacing.

But Hamm is the real psychotic of the troupe. Unlike Bats, Buddy comes in the guise of a friend, before finally actualising his rage and cruelty. It’s disappointing that the final showdown descends into a mindless macho wrestle, but the storytelling is movingly redeemed in the epilogue.

As ever, Wright is constantly imaginative in deploying his action beats and setpieces. For him, it’s not enough to give us a scuzzy warehouse gun deal, so he delivers it as if a group of bankers are being presented with a fine dining experience. Wright gleefully toys with our expectations throughout, whether it means building to the ultimate car chase, only to show us a foot race; giving us musical intros we think we know but we don’t; or inverting the mentor role by making the kid the carer.

A very welcome stem of morality runs through the movie. It is made abundantly – perhaps excessively – clear that Baby is a boy with a good heart, a million miles from the French Connection-type antihero. Yet, ever the optimist, Wright’s fable is as much a reflection of the countercultural mood of its time as any film from the Nixon era. He is right-on when he proposes that real heroism in the modern age is in decency, accountability and humility – an implicit indictment, perhaps, of today’s prevailing political bleakness.

What a rush this movie is, and what a work of authorship. Employing style in the service of soulfulness, Baby Driver is like Nicolas Winding Refn’s Drive shot through with the sensibility of a Hollywood musical. It’s absolutely an Edgar Wright joint and it’s an absolute joy, and if it isn’t on my end-of-year best-of list then I’ll eat my driving gloves.

Baby Driver is out in cinemas on 28th June 2017.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Good-bye, Adam West / Uninhibited Revenge: Walter Hill’S The Assignment

It’s kind of hard for me to undersell the impact Batman and Adam West had on me as a boy. I was six years old when the show premiered, and it was the first program I can remember seeing previews for and *begging* my mom to commit to letting me watch it when it finally came on. Like most every boy my age in the mid ’60s, I had a makeshift costume, a lunchbox, a plastic Batmobile, the Batman TV soundtrack (I still own the original LP), and of course the comic books, which never seemed quite as captivating to me compared to the vivid pop-art energy of the series. And hardly least of all, Batman introduced Julie Newmar’s Catwoman to me, who in turn introduced a whole other set of feelings to this six-year-old– fear and sex all rolled up into one inexplicable but ooh-la-la! package. (I’ll spare you,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

12 Movies to Watch After You See ‘Free Fire’

We recommend titles that influenced Ben Wheatley and more.

With his sixth feature, Ben Wheatley finally has a wide release in America. Free Fire might be his most accessible movie yet, consisting a single location and pretty much just one long action sequence. It’s basically a 90-minute third act without the first two acts getting in the way. Also it features Oscar winner Brie Larson, and who doesn’t like watching her act?

If you like what you see, then you’ll want to discover Wheatley’s other work, starting with the small crime film Down Terrace, which kicked off his career. I also recommend the following dozen movies, some of which are direct influences on Wheatley, others being similar kinds of films, and then just whatever else I had determined worthy.

The Truce Hurts (1948)

Ben Wheatley loves Tom and Jerry cartoons and has cited them as an influence on his latest movie. I
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Interview: Director Walter Hill on The Assignment, Star Quality, and the Late Bill Paxton

With a career that started early as Steve McQueen’s screenwriter, Walter Hill has more than made his mark on American cinema. The writer of The Getaway and Alien, and director of Hard Times, The Warriors, 48 Hours, Streets of Fire, Wild Bill, and so many iconic films spoke with me about his latest, the neo-noir crime thriller, The Assignment. The Lady Miz Diva: The Assignment came under controversy practically from the moment it was announced. Do you think there were misconceived notions about the film? What was your take on the controversy? Walter Hill: Well, I certainly think that there are some misconceptions. Where to begin? The movie was attacked because the premise was felt to be in some ways disrespectful to the transgender...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Exclusive Interview: Tye Sheridan Talks Detour

Despite starring in a major blockbuster like X-Men: Apocalypse, Tye Sheridan still excels at playing rich characters in smaller, independent movies, such as Mud and Joe, films he can really deep dive into. Now out in theaters, Detour is his latest indie effort, and it’s a crime thriller well worth a watch.

Sheridan portrays a young law student named Harper in the film, who blindly and drunkenly enters into a pact with Johnny (Emory Cohen), a dangerous thug who offers to kill Harper’s stepfather after Harper tells him he thinks the man’s responsible for the accident that sent his mother into a coma.

When Johnny shows up at Harper’s door the next day, he demands they drive to Las Vegas, where Harper’s stepdad will be. Also along for the ride is Cherry (Bel Powley), Johnny’s reluctant associate, but as the trio head into the desert,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Walter Hill: ‘Don’t Feel Sorry for Film Directors’

Walter Hill: ‘Don’t Feel Sorry for Film Directors’
Lyon, France — Walter Hill’s films are not renowned for sentimentality. In “Driver,” “The Long Riders,” and “Southern Comfort,” men fight, win or lose, live or die. And that’s the way it goes.

The same could be said about Hill himself. At a Lyon Lumière Festival masterclass, he fielded questions for an hour-and-a-half on Monday, talking frankly in his deep voice – much more frankly than most giving masterclasses – about how he got started, his influences, and his big hit “48 Hrs.” On occasion, especially when he recalled people rather than films, a sense of big-heartedness, and some pain, shone through.

Here are 10 things Hill said at Lyon.

1. Sam Peckinpah

By 1972, when Hill wrote “The Getaway,” Peckinpah was “an alcoholic, and I don’t think that is a secret I’m sharing.” For Hill, “The Getaway” was probably “the last film Peckinpah made where he was absolutely in full control of his faculties as a filmmaker…
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Review: "Hard Times" (1975) Starring Charles Bronson And James Coburn; Sony DVD Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer 

Sony has released Walter Hill's 1975 directorial debut, Hard Times, on on DVD through their Sony Choice Collection. Hill was an up-and-coming screenwriter with Peckinpah's The Getaway to his credit as well as solid thrillers like The Drowning Pool, The Mackintosh Man and Hickey and Boggs. There is no evidence in Hard Times that Hill was a novice behind the camera, either. This is one of my favorite films of the period, though many retro movie fans probably haven't seen it. The story is set in 1933. Chaney (Charles Bronson) is a middle-aged drifter who ends up crossing paths with Speed (James Coburn), a fast-talking promoter of "street fights" (no holds barred matches between local tough guys with no rules or regulations). Needing some quick cash, the soft-spoken, low-key Chaney forms a partnership with the mercurial Speed. In his first match, they win big when Chaney knocks the
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Don’T Bother To Knock (1952)

The icon-establishing performances Marilyn Monroe gave in Howard HawksGentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) and in Billy Wilder’s Some Like It Hot (1959) are ones for the ages, touchstone works that endure because of the undeniable comic energy and desperation that sparked them from within even as the ravenous public became ever more enraptured by the surface of Monroe’s seductive image of beauty and glamour. Several generations now probably know her only from these films, or perhaps 1955’s The Seven-Year Itch, a more famous probably for the skirt-swirling pose it generated than anything in the movie itself, one of director Wilder’s sourest pictures, or her final completed film, The Misfits (1961), directed by John Huston, written by Arthur Miller and costarring Clark Gable and Montgomery Clift.

But in Don’t Bother to Knock (1952) she delivers a powerful dramatic performance as Nell, a psychologically devastated, delusional, perhaps psychotic young woman apparently on
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Win Brewster’s Millions on DVD

  • HeyUGuys
To mark the release of Brewster’s Millions on 28th March, we’ve been given3 copies to give away on DVD. Brewster’s Millions is a 1985 comedy film starring Richard Pryor and John Candy based on the 1902 novel of the same name by George Barr McCutcheon. It was directed by Walter Hill. (48 Hours, The Getaway,

The post Win Brewster’s Millions on DVD appeared first on HeyUGuys.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

‘Fargo’ Season 2 Premiere Postmortem: Noah Hawley On the Reboot, Ronald Reagan and UFOs

‘Fargo’ Season 2 Premiere Postmortem: Noah Hawley On the Reboot, Ronald Reagan and UFOs
Now that FX has unveiled the second season premiere of anthology drama “Fargo,” you may have a few questions. (Like, what’s up with the Ronald Reagan references? And, was that really a UFO?)

Variety spoke with showrunner Noah Hawley about the new season and asked about Reagan, the UFO, his stylistic choices (dig that split screen) and killing off Kieran Culkin in the first hour — among other topics.

After all the acclaim that Season One received, you stuck by the decision to start fresh in Season Two. What do you see as the differences and similarities between the seasons?

It’s a much bigger year — story-wise, character-wise, the setting and time period and thematically — it’s much more of an American epic. The first year was a more contained, intimate story. The ambition here, what it took to pull it off, was a lot greater, and yet it still
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Movie Poster of the Week: Sam Peckinpah in Polish

  • MUBI
Above: Jerzy Flisak’s 1972 poster for The Ballad of Cable Hogue (Sam Peckinpah, USA, 1970)To coincide with the complete retrospective of the films of Sam Peckinpah currently running at the Locarno Film Festival, I thought I might try to select the best posters of one of my favorite directors. But when I looked at all the posters for Peckinpah’s films it was clear that the best Peckinpah posters were made in Poland. There are a couple of great American one sheets from the 1970s—those stark black and white photographs for Straw Dogs and The Getaway—but nothing quite matches these six Polish designs for visual panache. Jerzy Flisak’s typically witty and playful poster for the most light-hearted of Peckinpah Westerns, The Ballad of Cable Hogue, is one of Flisak’s greatest designs and one that beautifully encapsulates the story of an old prospector exploiting a well in the Arizona desert.
See full article at MUBI »

Pat Garrett And Billy The Kid

Here's another installment featuring Joe Dante's reviews from his stint as a critic for Film Bulletin circa 1969-1974. Our thanks to Video Watchdog and Tim Lucas for his editorial embellishments!

Post-production tampering mitigates against this Western by Sam Peckinpah finding its deserved reception from better-class audiences. Shortened release version is vague, confusing, and is being sold as routine action entry in saturation breaks where it should perform routinely, no more. Kris Kristofferson and acting debut of Bob Dylan provide youth lures. Rating: R.

“It feels like times have changed,” says Pat Garrett. “Times, maybe—not me," says Billy the Kid. A classical Sam Peckinpah exchange, reflecting one of the numerous obsessive themes that run through his latest Western. But times certainly haven’t changed for Peckinpah—for, despite the overdue success of his last venture, The Getaway, the embattled and iconoclastic director who revolutionized the Western with The Wild Bunch
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Locarno 2015. Lineup

  • MUBI
Hong Sang-soo's Right Now, Wrong Then.The lineup for the 2015 festival has been revealed, including new films by Hong Sang-soo, Andrzej Zulawski, Chantal Akerman, Athina Rachel Tsangari, and others, alongside retrospectives and tributes dedicated to Sam Peckinpah, Michael Cimino, Bulle Ogier, and much more.Piazza GRANDERicki and the Flash (Jonathan Demme, USA)La belle saison (Catherine Corsini, France)Le dernier passage (Pascal Magontier, France)Der staat gegen Fritz Bauer (Lars Kraume, Germany)Southpaw (Antoine Fuqua, USA)Trainwreck (Judd Apatow, USA)Jack (Elisabeth Scharang, Austria)Floride (Philippe Le Guay, France)The Deer Hunter (Michael Cimino, UK/USA)Erlkönig (Georges Schwizgebel, Switzerland)Guibord s'en va-t-en guerre (Philippe Falardeau, Canada)Bombay Velvet (Anurag Kashyap, India)Pastorale cilentana (Mario Martone, Italy)La vanite (Lionel Baier, Switzerland/France)The Laundryman (Lee Chung, Taiwan)Me and Earl and the Dying Girl (Alfonso Gomez-Rejon, USA) I pugni ni tasca (Marco Bellocchio, Italy)Heliopolis (Sérgio Machado, Brazil)Amnesia (Barbet Schroeder,
See full article at MUBI »

Hard Times and the Charles Bronson Exhibit April 1st at Schlafly Bottleworks

“I suppose you’ve been down the long, hard road?”

“Who hasn’t?”

You never know what’s brewing at Webster University’s Strange Brew cult film series. It’s always the first Wednesday evening of every month, and they always come up with some cult classic to show while enjoying some good food and great suds. The fun happens at Schlafly Bottleworks Restaurant and Bar in Maplewood (7260 Southwest Ave.- at Manchester – Maplewood, Mo 63143).

This month, they’re brewing up some Bronson! Hard Times screens at Schlafly Bottleworks Wednesday, April 1st as part of Webster University’s ‘Strange Brew’ Film Series. The ‘Charles Bronson Exhibit’, a collection of movie paper, figures, models kits, toys, and other odd memorabilia will be on display that night at Schlafly.

No one could touch Charles Bronson in terms of global popularity throughout the 1970’s and Hard Times (1975) was his best film from that decade (my favorite for cinema,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Steve McQueen biopic gets financing; Jeremy Renner and others interested

  • JoBlo
The Thomas Crown Affair. Bullitt, The Getaway. Grand Prix. The Towering Inferno. The Great Escape. The Magnificent Seven. Papillon. Every film a classic and every one of them starring Steve McQueen. Thirty-five years after his untimely death at the age of fifty, the world will finally be getting the biopic of one of the greatest movie stars in Hollywood history. The announcement comes via Lake Forest Entertainment and The Exchange have teamed up to finance the film which will be titled...
See full article at JoBlo »

Peter Coffin’s Studio Playlist

  • Vulture
Peter Coffin’s Studio Playlist
For an artist whose practice is predicated on the somewhat subversive, it's no surprise that Peter Coffin would stack a playlist with Miles Davis and Kraftwerk and Tonto's Expanding Headband. "I don't have anything interesting or quotable to say about the songs I sent,” he wrote, somewhat teasingly, "They inspire different moods." Coffins's works do, too — whether with his outdoor Cloud installations or oversize taxidermy animal sculptures or slow-motion videos. For those times when you don’t know where you want to go but want the journey to inspire you, listen up.Terry Riley, "In the Summer" Miles Davis, "Little Church" Toots Thielemans, "Love Theme From 'The Getaway' Yesterday & Today" Kraftwerk, "Ananas Symphonie (pineapple symphony)" David Crosby, "Laughing" Tonto's Expanding Headband, "Riversong" Lifetones, "Good Side" Carlos Santana & John McLaughlin, "Naima" Grace Jones, "The Fashion Show" Was (not Was), "Wheel Me Out"
See full article at Vulture »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites