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(1972–1983)

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Playback: Honorary Oscar Recipient Donald Sutherland Reflects on His Career

Playback: Honorary Oscar Recipient Donald Sutherland Reflects on His Career
Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety podcast bringing you exclusive conversations with the talents behind many of today’s hottest films.

The film Academy’s Governors Awards ceremony is set for this weekend, honoring filmmakers Charles Burnett and Agnes Varda, cinematographer Owen Roizman and actor Donald Sutherland. Sutherland’s name in particular was a heavy favorite in advance of this year’s honorees announcement, as Oscar recognition for the esteemed star has been elusive. So it’s a perfect time to dive into one of the legendary screen careers.

Listen to this week’s episode of “Playback” below. New episodes air every Thursday.

Click here for more episodes of “Playback.”

Sutherland is currently filming James Gray’s “Ad Astra” and Danny Boyle’s “Trust” (in which he plays oil tycoon J. Paul Getty). So while these kinds of things can have a “lifetime achievement” vibe for some, the actor is still very much at the top of his
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Walk of Fame Honoree Jeffrey Tambor on His Long Path From Stage to ‘Transparent’ Triumph

Walk of Fame Honoree Jeffrey Tambor on His Long Path From Stage to ‘Transparent’ Triumph
Long before his TV success, Jeffrey Tambor spent many years in repertory theater. Recalling those days, when he traveled around the country performing in cities such as Seattle, San Diego and Louisville, Tambor says, “There was an actor playing Casca in ‘Julius Caesar.’ He read my palm and I rolled my eyes, but he said [success] is going to happen but very late.”

The 73-year-old actor says he is “stunned and grateful and happy” about receiving a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Aug. 8. He recalls a childhood visit to Los Angeles from San Francisco, where he grew up. “I remember my father, Bernard, took my brother Larry and I — I was 10 years old, if that — to Hollywood,” he says. “We did the thing where you put your handprints where Clark Gable’s were. So this is quite the circle, quite a moment for me.”

Tambor began acting on the small screen in 1977. He racked up
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Carol Kane Recalls Her Emmy Win for ‘Taxi’: ‘I Knew How Lucky I Was’

Carol Kane Recalls Her Emmy Win for ‘Taxi’: ‘I Knew How Lucky I Was’
Given her theater training, it shouldn’t be a surprise that Carol Kane seemed completely cool when she took the stage in 1982 to accept the Emmy for lead actress in a comedy for her work in ABC’s “Taxi” (she’d win the supporting actress in a comedy trophy the next year, even though the show had been cancelled by then). In a period-appropriate puffy-sleeved dress that matched her trademark voluminous blonde curls, Kane dutifully thanked her “incredibly generous” co-stars as well as series creator Jim Brooks, her parents and other luminaries before politely exiting the stage in a timely manner. Looking back on it, Kane — this year a contender in the supporting actress in a comedy category for Netflix’s “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” — tells Variety that the poise was an act.

Were you feeling as confident as you looked when you accepted your award?

Part of that togetherness was just fear. I
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Best TV Guest Stars Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
The Best TV Guest Stars Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: Who has been the best guest star on a scripted show?

Tim Surette (@timsurette), TV.com

Wayne Brady showing up in body armor and riding a horse on Syfy’s post-apocalyptic disaster disaster “Aftermath” needs to be mentioned somewhere in this critics’ roundup, so here it is. But I’ll point out two from intentional comedies that come to mind. Timothy Olyphant’s short run on “The Grinder” as himself was fantastic and if I didn’t mention this my coworker Kaitlin would kill me. But my pick goes to David Duchovny, also as himself, on “The Larry Sanders Show.” We’d largely known Duchovny for
See full article at Indiewire »

The Best TV Guest Stars Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best TV Guest Stars Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: Who has been the best guest star on a scripted show?

Tim Surette (@timsurette), TV.com

Wayne Brady showing up in body armor and riding a horse on Syfy’s post-apocalyptic disaster disaster “Aftermath” needs to be mentioned somewhere in this critics’ roundup, so here it is. But I’ll point out two from intentional comedies that come to mind. Timothy Olyphant’s short run on “The Grinder” as himself was fantastic and if I didn’t mention this my coworker Kaitlin would kill me. But my pick goes to David Duchovny, also as himself, on “The Larry Sanders Show.” We’d largely known Duchovny for
See full article at Indiewire Television »

'Mash' Star William Christopher Death Certificate (Document)

  • TMZ
"Mash" star William Christopher -- who played Father John Mulcahy -- died from cardiorespiratory arrest ... this according to his death certificate obtained by TMZ. The document also lists small cell carcinoma as a contributing factor, something we're told was non-lung related. Christopher died on New Year's Eve in his Pasadena home at 7:12 Am. The death certificate also notes he was in the entertainment industry for 60 years. Christopher was 84, and the final celebrity death in
See full article at TMZ »

Alan Alda Pens Sweet Tribute to Late M*A*S*H Costar William Christopher

  • PEOPLE.com
Alan Alda Pens Sweet Tribute to Late M*A*S*H Costar William Christopher
Alan Alda remembered his pal and M*A*S*H costar William Christopher in a Twitter post on Sunday, just one day after the actor died from cancer.

“His pals from #Mash miss Bill powerfully. His kind strength, his grace and gentle humor weren’t acted. They were Bill. #WilliamChristopher,” Alda, 80, tweeted.

Christopher died at 5:10 a.m. Pt on Saturday morning with his wife, Barbara, at his side. He was 84. A rep for the star told People that he died “peacefully” and was “not in pain.”

Christopher’s son, John, told ABC that the actor died from a non-small cell lung carcinoma at his home in Pasadena, California.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘M*A*S*H’ Star William Christopher Dies at 84

‘M*A*S*H’ Star William Christopher Dies at 84
William Christopher, the actor who played the sensitive and soft-spoken Father John Mulcahy on the long-running CBS comedy “M*A*S*H,” died Saturday at his home in Pasadena, Calif. He was 84.

The actor’s son, John Christopher, confirmed Christopher’s death to Kabc-tv Los Angeles. Christopher died of non-lung small cell carcinoma, Kabc-tv reported.

Christopher was a regular and a fan favorite throughout the 1972-1983 run of the much-praised “M*A*S*H.” The show’s final episode still holds the ratings record for the most watched series closer with nearly 106 million viewers tuning in. Christopher was also featured in the spinoff series “AfterMASH,” which ran from 1983-85 on CBS.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

'Mash' Star William Christopher Dead at 84

  • TMZ
"Mash" star William Christopher -- who played Father John Mulcahy on the iconic show -- is the latest celebrity to die in 2016. Christopher was part of one of the most spectacular ensembles ever on TV ... a cast which included Alan Alda, Jamie Farr, Mike Farrell, Loretta Swit and Harry Morgan. Christopher, who played a Catholic priest but was actually Methodist in real life, auditioned for the role but went off script with a rambling ad lib.
See full article at TMZ »

Mash: Jamie Farr Shares His Favorite Episodes

  • TVSeriesFinale
What are your favorite episodes of Mash? Starting Monday, star Jamie Farr will share his favorite episodes of the iconic CBS series on MeTV.Farr played Max Klinger on the long-running dramedy alongside fellow cast members Alan Alda, Wayne Rogers, McLean Stevenson, and Loretta Swit. The series, which chronicled the staff of a mobile army surgical hospital during the Korean War, ran for 11 seasons before ending in 1983.Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

'Rugrats' & 'Newhart' Star Jack Riley -- Dead at 80 (Photos + Video)

  • TMZ
Jack Riley -- the voice of "Rugrats" fave, Stu Pickles, and co-star of "The Bob Newhart Show" -- has died of pneumonia. Jack famously played Elliot Carlin, one Newhart's super neurotic patients, during all 6 seasons of the classic '70s TV sitcom. More recently he was the father of Tommy and Dil Pickles in the "Rugrats" cartoon series and movies. Jack also starred in several Mel Brooks movies and had tons of guest roles
See full article at TMZ »

Alan Alda Talks First Emmy Win, ‘Horace and Pete’ and Doing Cartwheels at 80

Alan Alda Talks First Emmy Win, ‘Horace and Pete’ and Doing Cartwheels at 80
With 34 nominations and six wins, Alan Alda is an Emmy institution. He even won an Intl. Emmy in 2012. His first win came in 1974 for his iconic role as “Hawkeye” Pierce in “Mash” — when he triumphed over “Kojak” star Telly Savalas in an “Actor of the Year” showdown for a “Super Emmy” pitting the drama series winner against the comedy series champ. (The first, and last, time the Emmys ever tried that.) This year, Alda is in the running as part of the ensemble cast of Louis C.K.’s drama “Horace and Pete.”

After so many awards, what’s your best advice on giving a speech?

The only thing you have to be careful of is not to say “I thoroughly agree with you.” You can’t let that creep in. It is hard. The show business awards are different from most other awards. In most other awards they actually expect you to say something that’s worth listening to and they give you more than 30 seconds. The hard part is to think of something short enough to say that expresses something you mean.

Do any Emmy wins stand out more than the others?

The writing one meant so much. I wanted to be a writer and a good writer since I was 8 years old. To get an Emmy for writing meant so much that that was really spontaneous when I did the cartwheel on the way to the stage. I guess it’s stuck in my mind because, I’m 80 now, but a couple of months after my 80th birthday, I was on the beach in the Virgin Islands and I said, “I’m gonna see if I can still do a cartwheel.”

How did it go?

It doesn’t look a lot like a cartwheel, but it technically was a real cartwheel. I landed on my feet, staggered around a bit and pumped the air as if I had done something spectacular.

Has anything changed for you about going to award shows over the years?

I don’t think there’s been any change except as my grandchildren have got older they’re always rooting for me to get an Emmy or an Oscar nomination so they can come. They want to walk the red carpet with me. They were very funny when I was nominated for an Oscar [for “The Aviator”], they were doing the interviews instead of me.

What’s the best part of being recognized with something like an Emmy?

It can help the project you’re doing. I hope [“Horace and Pete”] gets nominations and wins some Emmys because I think it’s such a powerful piece of work that it would really benefit from attention being drawn to it by an Emmy or two. Of course, you can’t take it too seriously, because I think it’s true the day after an award show it’s very hard to remember who won, except the person who has the trophy to remind him or her. Still, it’s a wonderful thing. When I think of the surprise I felt the first time and I think of the amazement I felt as I got more. You can’t not feel terrific about it.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

TV Is Addicted to Addicts, But Does It Get Dependence Right?

TV Is Addicted to Addicts, But Does It Get Dependence Right?
There’s a lingering perception in pop culture that drug use is glamorous and au courant, something that builds character and renders a person sexy and intriguing, like an advanced degree in comp lit or the ability to acquire foreign languages easily. See Don Draper with a martini in one hand and a beautiful mistress in the other. Or Jessa on “Girls,” whose bohemian clothes and Rapunzel hair perpetuate the illusion that cocaine-cum-heroin junkies forever maintain the appearance of a Free People catalogue model. In real life, heroin junkies develop abscesses and hacking coughs, sores on their lips and acne. They look like ghosts. Even on “Nurse Jackie,” one of the decade’s most convincing portraits of drug addiction, there were just so many episodes where you had to suspend your disbelief — Jackie should have been dead by season two. Of course, then we would have missed out on five more seasons and Edie Falco’s most dynamic career performance, for which she won the 2010 Emmy for lead actress in a drama.

Because of addiction’s prevalence in our society — according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2014 there were 10,574 heroin overdose deaths in the U.S. — TV is teeming with characters struggling with drugs and alcohol, from “Shameless” to “Mr. Robot” to IFC’s “Maron” and the sobriety sitcom “Mom.” And some shows do it well; if ever a series unflinchingly — if, occasionally, satirically — captured the gory violence of the crystal meth trade it’s “Breaking Bad,” for which Bryan Cranston pretty much monopolized the actor in a drama series category, winning the Emmy an astounding four times.

The Television Academy, in fact, has a history of rewarding small-screen lushes. For his iconic turn as the perpetually soused Hawkeye on “Mash,” Alan Alda won two actor Emmys. Candice Bergen won the Emmy for actress in a comedy series five times for playing a recovering alcoholic on “Murphy Brown,” and Ted Danson scored two Emmys for playing sobered-up baseball player-turned-bar proprietor Sam Malone on “Cheers.” Even Jim Parsons, who plays socially challenged theoretical physicist Sheldon Cooper on the “The Big Bang Theory,” nabbed his first Emmy win for an episode in which he gets sloppy drunk. Hollywood, it seems, loves a character who can’t handle his booze.

But rare is the series that deals with addiction in a way that accurately depicts the frustrating, oft fatal, and sometimes even boring reality of what it is — a disease. There’s a general tendency among critics to assess shows on the strength of their entertainment value, and not how truthfully they convey what it’s actually like to be an addict — or live with one. “Ray Donovan” tackles heady addiction-adjacent subject matter like molestation and Irish-Catholic broods, and “Orange Is the New Black” features a cast of addict convicts, but there isn’t a small-screen counterpart examining, say, the lives of depressed, college-educated worker bees quietly dependent on benzo­diazepines. And there are millions of those people.

Granted, most facets of addiction probably wouldn’t make for good television. Comedies like “Broad City” and “Freaks and Geeks” aside, in the real world there is nothing less interesting than watching potheads get stoned.

A life of abstinence, however, can be hilarious, which is why comedies like “Mom” and “Catastrophe,” with all of their off-color, self-effacing wit, so successfully chronicle the journey of the addict in recovery. On “Mom,” Emmy-winner Allison Janney and Anna Faris play a sober mother-daughter team coping with booze cravings, romantic dysfunction, and the daily challenges of being sober physically — but not necessarily emotionally. On Amazon’s “Catastrophe,” Rob Delaney nails the part of an affectionate and loving but also conventionally narcissistic man-child who quit drinking after he “shit at [his] sister’s wedding.”

What’s especially refreshing about both of these shows is that they debunk the myth that once you get clean you’re suddenly “fixed.” Instead, they’re predicated on the fact that addiction is a disease that people live with for their entire lives, whether or not they’re actively getting wasted. What’s so commendable about “Mom” especially is that it examines what most people do not understand — that sobriety can be the most difficult aspect of alcoholism.

On the flip side, Freeform’s now-canceled “Recovery Road” was a show that missed the mark entirely, serving up a candy-coated rendering of rehab that belies most everything we know to be true. The series’ collective flaws are best summed up in one line, said by a high school guidance counselor to Maddie (Jessica Sula), a strung-out party girl she’s threatening with expulsion unless she moves into a sober living facility: “You can go to school by day and spend your evenings getting sober.” As if sobriety is a part-time job. Maddie tries to keep her situation a secret, and the surrounding adults seem Ok with that — even though honesty is one of the primary tenets of recovery. You can tell what the network was trying to do — create a show about addiction that parents could watch with their kids. But that’s a pointless task if it doesn’t ring true.

“Shameless,” for all of its outlandishness — patriarchal drunk Frank Gallagher (Emmy-nominated William H. Macy) has survived liver failure, a kitchen fire, and being tossed over a bridge into a river — is the series that perhaps most accurately captures the pervasiveness with which alcoholism wreaks havoc on a family. Everybody suffers. Everybody is powerless. Denial rips through the family line. Whether they are using or not, all of the Gallagher kids are living with the –ism.

When it comes down to it, no fictional TV series can definitively capture the brutal truth of how drugs and alcohol destroy people’s lives. Rather, it’s documentaries like Steven Okazaki’s brilliant and harrowing “Heroin: Cape Cod” — which focuses on eight young addicts — that paint the starkest, most blistering, and most realistic portrait of addiction. Because addiction isn’t pretty, and it’s often not something that you want to tune in to watch.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

'M*A*S*H' Star Wayne Rogers -- Alleged Baby Mama Hits Up Estate for $3.4 Million

  • TMZ
'M*A*S*H' Star Wayne Rogers -- Alleged Baby Mama Hits Up Estate for $3.4 Million
The woman who says late "M*A*S*H" star Wayne Rogers fathered her son is now going after his estate to get the huge sum she says she's owed ... a whopping $3.4 million.  Melinda Naud filed a creditors claim this week against Rogers' estate ... a follow-up to the civil suit she filed back in 2013. Naud claims Rogers begged her to keep it quiet after she gave birth to their kid, Luigi Calabrese, back in 1985.  Naud
See full article at TMZ »

Wayne Rogers, Trapper John on ‘M.A.S.H.,’ Dies at 82

Wayne Rogers, Trapper John on ‘M.A.S.H.,’ Dies at 82
Wayne Rogers, best known for playing Captain “Trapper” John McIntyre on TV comedy series “M.A.S.H.,” died Thursday in Los Angeles from complications of pneumonia. He was 82.

He appeared on “M.A.S.H.” for only the first three of 11 seasons, but the army surgeon was one of the most popular characters on the show, known for his repartee with Alan Alda’s Hawkeye Pierce. He was reportedly frustrated by the show’s focus on Alda when he quit after three seasons, with Mike Farrell replacing him as B.J. Hunnicut.

Despite Rogers’ departure from the show, he remained friendly with Alda, who saluted his Rogers in a Twitter message: “He was smart, funny, curious and dedicated,” Alda wrote. “We made a pact to give Mash all we had and it bonded us.”

He was smart, funny, curious and dedicated. We made a pact to give Mash all
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Wayne Rogers, Played M*A*S*H's Trapper John, Dead at 82

Wayne Rogers, Played M*A*S*H's Trapper John, Dead at 82
Wayne Rogers, best known to TV audiences for playing Captain “Trapper” John McIntyre on M*A*S*H, died on Thursday after suffering complications from pneumonia, his family told Entertainment Tonight. He was 82.

Rogers’ first major acting role was on the ABC Western Stagecoach West, which debuted in October 1960 and ran for 38 episodes. A little over a decade (and numerous gigs) later, he was cast as Trapper John on CBS’ TV adaptation of M*A*S*H, assuming the role played by Elliott Gould in the 1970 film.

Bidding M*A*S*H adieu after three seasons, Rogers went on to
See full article at TVLine.com »

Wayne Rogers Dies: ‘M.A.S.H.’s Trapper John Was 82

  • Deadline
Wayne Rogers Dies: ‘M.A.S.H.’s Trapper John Was 82
Actor and entrepreneur Wayne Rogers, best known for playing Captain “Trapper” John McIntyre from 1972-1975 on the long-running CBS dramedy "M.A.S.H." has died today following complications from pneumonia. His publicist confirmed the news to Deadline: he was 82. Born in Birmingham, Alabama in 1933, he was a graduate of The Webb School in Tennessee and earned a history degree from Princeton, then served in the U.S. Navy before embarking on his career as an actor. Acting on both…
See full article at Deadline »

The X Factor Final 2015: as it happened

Reggie N Bollie v Louisa Johnson. Only one could be crowned X Factor champion 2015, but who?

10.03pm GMT

Anyway, that’s it. Louisa Johnson has won X Factor 2015, which means this is probably the last X Factor liveblog I’ll ever write. I might change my mind, or be coerced into returning next year, but right now this really feels like the end of something. I realise this means I’ll miss Louisa’s triumphant return to X Factor next year, which will be her first of three televised appearances before she disappears forever, but I’m sure we’ll all survive.

In which case, thanks again for all the support, everyone. You guys have been great. Now, please do the decent thing and turn your televisions off.

10.02pm GMT

Unfortunately Harry Styles didn’t run onstage and tell Louisa about all the pussy she’ll get now, but I’m sure he wanted to.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

‘The Martian’: Ridley Scott May Buck Losing Trend at Oscars

By Patrick Shanley

Managing Editor

The Martian, which remained in the top three at the box office over the weekend in its sixth week at theaters, is a bonafide hit for legendary director Ridley Scott and will almost certainly earn multiple nominations from the Academy.

Scott is no stranger to nominations, having earned three best directing nods in his career, but the award itself still eludes the English director. 2000’s Gladiator may have earned a best actor Oscar for Russell Crowe and best picture, but Scott lost best director to Steven Soderbergh for Traffic. The very next year saw the same outcome for Scott as his directing nomination for Black Hawk Down lost out to Crowe-starring A Beautiful Mind‘s director, Ron Howard.

This year is shaping up to be different for Scott, however, as The Martian continues to rack up at the box office and resound with critics. A
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

The X Factor 2015: week two – as it happened

It was Reinvention Week, and nobody was good. But who went home? Stuart Heritage found out.

8.59pm GMT

And with that, we say goodbye to Kiera and Seann with sincere gratitude, because their departure means that X Factor will only be one hour and 45 minutes long next week. But Oh No Sad News: I won’t be here for it. I’m away next Saturday, which means that this liveblog will be handled by someone equally capable. I think the plan is for me to retake the reigns for Sunday’s results show, but I’ve forgotten to check with anyone. Oh well, you’ll cope either way.

Thanks for reading if you read it, thanks for commenting if you commented. I’m off to surround myself with creepy cult members who’ll sit around me in silence as I play awful songs on the ukulele. Blardigan!

8.58pm GMT

Oh.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
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