The Party (1968) - News Poster

(1968)

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Giveaway – Win The Party starring Peter Sellers

Eureka Entertainment releases The Party, Blake Edwards’ fish-out-of-water, comedy cult classic starring Peter Sellers, as part of the Eureka Classics range on Blu-ray for the first time in the UK on October 16th 2017, and we have three copies to give away.

With the massive success of Breakfast at Tiffany’s and The Pink Panther cementing his reputation as one of America’s finest directors of comedic cinema, Blake Edwards followed them up with The Party, arguably his greatest film, and at the time one of the most experimental films ever produced by a Hollywood studio.

By a twist of fate, the clumsy but good-hearted, aspiring actor Hrundi V. Bakshi (Peter Sellers, The Pink Panther, Dr. Strangelove) is invited to attend Fred “General” Clutterbuck’s big party, after having utterly ruined the set of his latest feature film. In this cozy and friendly atmosphere, drinks are flowing, food is in abundance
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The 100 Greatest Comedies of All-Time, According to BBC’s Critics Poll

After polling critics from around the world for the greatest American films of all-time, BBC has now forged ahead in the attempt to get a consensus on the best comedies of all-time. After polling 253 film critics, including 118 women and 135 men, from 52 countries and six continents a simple, the list of the 100 greatest is now here.

Featuring canonical classics such as Some Like It Hot, Dr. Strangelove, Annie Hall, Duck Soup, Playtime, and more in the top 10, there’s some interesting observations looking at the rest of the list. Toni Erdmann is the most recent inclusion, while the highest Wes Anderson pick is The Royal Tenenbaums. There’s also a healthy dose of Chaplin and Lubitsch with four films each, and the recently departed Jerry Lewis has a pair of inclusions.

Check out the list below (and my ballot) and see more on their official site.

100. (tie) The King of Comedy (Martin Scorsese,
See full article at The Film Stage »

All of the Films Joining FilmStruck’s Criterion Channel this August

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This August will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Tuesday, August 1

Tuesday’s Short + Feature: These Boots and Mystery Train

Music is at the heart of this program, which pairs a zany music video by Finnish master Aki Kaurismäki with a tune-filled career highlight from American independent-film pioneer Jim Jarmusch. In the 1993 These Boots, Kaurismäki’s band of pompadoured “Finnish Elvis” rockers, the Leningrad Cowboys, cover a Nancy Sinatra classic in their signature deadpan style. It’s the perfect prelude to Jarmusch’s 1989 Mystery Train, a homage to the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll and the musical legacy of Memphis, featuring appearances by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins and Joe Strummer.
See full article at CriterionCast »

July 18th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Kong: Skull Island, Resident Evil: Vendetta, The Bat People

  • DailyDead
For the brand new Blu-ray and DVD offerings coming out on Tuesday, July 18th, we have an eclectic assortment of titles, both new and old. As far as cult classics go, The Bat People, Freeway, Stalker, and Stormy Monday are all making their HD debuts on Blu this week, and if you missed Kong: Skull Island, Free Fire or Buster’s Mal Heart during their theatrical runs, now you’ll have a chance to catch up with these films on their home entertainment releases.

Other notable release for July 18th include Resident Evil: Vendetta, Another Evil, Lake Alice, and The Expanse: Season Two.

The Bat People (Scream Factory, Blu-ray)

Half Man, Half Bat, All Terror!

From director Jerry Jameson (Airport 77, Raise The Titanic) comes a high-flying horror from the darkest corner of the drive-in: The Bat People!

When Dr. John Beck and his wife Cathy fall into an underground cave,
See full article at DailyDead »

Edwards Pt 2: The Pink Panther Sequels and Famous Silent Film Era Step-grandfather Director

'The Pink Panther' with Peter Sellers: Blake Edwards' 1963 comedy hit and its many sequels revolve around one of the most iconic film characters of the 20th century: clueless, thick-accented Inspector Clouseau – in some quarters surely deemed politically incorrect, or 'insensitive,' despite the lack of brown face make-up à la Sellers' clueless Indian guest in Edwards' 'The Party.' 'The Pink Panther' movies [1] There were a total of eight big-screen Pink Panther movies co-written and directed by Blake Edwards, most of them starring Peter Sellers – even after his death in 1980. Edwards was also one of the producers of every (direct) Pink Panther sequel, from A Shot in the Dark to Curse of the Pink Panther. Despite its iconic lead character, the last three movies in the Pink Panther franchise were box office bombs. Two of these, The Trail of the Pink Panther and Curse of the Pink Panther, were co-written by Edwards' son,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Pink Panther' Filmmaker at His Best Handling More Subtle Fare - Both Comedies and Dead Serious Dramas

Blake Edwards: Director of the 'Pink Panther' movies – and Julie Andrews' husband for more than four decades – was at his best handling polished comedies and a couple of dead serious dramas. Blake Edwards movies: Best known for slapstick fare, but at his best handling polished comedies and dramas The Pink Panther and its sequels[1] are the movies most closely associated with screenwriter-director-producer Blake Edwards, whose film and television career spanned more than half a century.[2] But unless you're a fan of Keystone Kops-style slapstick, they're the filmmaker's least interesting efforts. In fact, Edwards (born William Blake Crump in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on July 26, 1922) was at his best (co-)writing and/or directing polished comedies (e.g., Operation Petticoat, Victor Victoria) and, less frequently, dramas (Days of Wine and Roses, the romantic comedy-drama Breakfast at Tiffany's). The article below and follow-up posts offer a brief look at some of Blake Edwards' non-Pink Panther comedies,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

After The Fox / Being There

After The Fox

Blu-ray

Kino Lorber

2017 / Color / 2.35 : 1 widescreen / Street Date March 22, 2017

Starring: Peter Sellers, Victor Mature, Martin Balsem, Akim Tamiroff.

Cinematography: Leonida Barboni

Film Editor: Russell Lloyd

Written by Neil Simon and Cesare Zavattini

Produced by John Bryan

Directed by Vittorio De Sica

After The Fox, a sunny mid-sixties farce about con-artists and movie-makers, boasts a powerhouse pedigree featuring leading men Peter Sellers and Victor Mature, a script by Neil Simon and Cesare Zavattini, music by Burt Bacharach, poster art from Frank Frazetta and the legendary director/actor/gambler Vittorio De Sica at the helm.

With such diverse talent on board, the film was somewhat misleadingly promoted as another in the line of 60’s screwball hipster comedies like Casino Royale and What’s New Pussycat. But the result is closer to De Sica’s laid back charmers from the ‘50s, Miracle in Milan and Gold of Naples (in fact,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

All of the Films Joining Filmstruck’s Criterion Channel This April

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This April will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Monday, April 3 The Chaos of Cool: A Tribute to Seijun Suzuki

In February, cinema lost an icon of excess, Seijun Suzuki, the Japanese master who took the art of the B movie to sublime new heights with his deliriously inventive approach to narrative and visual style. This series showcases seven of the New Wave renegade’s works from his career breakthrough in the sixties: Take Aim at the Police Van (1960), an off-kilter whodunit; Youth of the Beast (1963), an explosive yakuza thriller; Gate of Flesh (1964), a pulpy social critique; Story of a Prostitute (1965), a tragic romance; Tokyo Drifter
See full article at CriterionCast »

Eye Say by Anne-Katrin Titze

Emma Stone shines with Ryan Gosling in Damien Chazelle's La La Land Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Take the opening number from Jacques Demy's Les Demoiselles De Rochefort mixed with Federico Fellini's 8 1/2 and copy to Los Angeles. Put girls in traffic light-colored dresses that vaguely resemble those from Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly's On the Town. Add an introspective song, channeling Claudine Longet, from Blake Edwards' The Party - plus an elephant and mix in some Esther Williams underwater fun. Make a melody sound like the one given by Michel Legrand to Michel Piccoli's M Dame. Borrow from Fred Astaire: Sand Under Shoes in Mark Sandrich's Top Hat, A Fine Romance of George Stevens' Swing Time, and the lift in Charles Walters' The Belle Of New York. From Kelly: Seine dance, paintings coming to life, studio setting and It's Always Fair Weather - without the war.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

It's Blue Monday: What movies cheer you up?

  • Cineplex
It's Blue Monday: What movies cheer you up?It's Blue Monday: What movies cheer you up?Adriana Floridia1/16/2017 9:16:00 Am

Today is Blue Monday, which experts have stated to be the most depressing day of the year. It's cold out, winter is only half over, and the excitement of the holidays has faded.

We at Cineplex want to turn this day around, and are giving you the opportunity to make the most depressing day into a great one. Scene is offering a special redemption promotion just for today, January 16th, which will make your Monday anything but blue.

On Blue Monday, Scene members can treat themselves to a movie by redeeming half the amount of points for tickets – 500 points for regular movies, 750 points for enhanced experiences and 1,000 for VIP Cinemas. This promotion applies for ticket purchases both in theatres and online. Scene members will also be able to redeem
See full article at Cineplex »

Locarno Blog. "The Party"

  • MUBI
The Notebook is the North American home for Locarno Film Festival Artistic Director Carlo Chatrian's blog. Chatrian has been writing thoughtful blog entries in Italian on Locarno's website since he took over as Director in late 2012, and now you can find the English translations here on the Notebook as they're published. The Locarno Film Festival will be taking place August 2 - 12.If I think back to my earliest memories of the cinema, one fact—along with the names of certain films—leaps to mind. Or rather, not a fact, but a sensation. A sensation that fades into a hazy memory. At the movies I laughed at the twists and turns of bodies that could transpose acrobatic moves into everyday life, and at other bodies, too, ones that really were made of rubber, or seemed to be. Bodies that could be bent out of shape and absorb incredible falls, shocks and
See full article at MUBI »

Wamg Giveaway – Win the Search Party Blu-ray

From the co-writer of Old School and The Hangover Part II comes the riotous road comedy Search Party. When the love of his life (Shannon Woodward) jilts him at the altar thanks to his hard partying pals Jason (T.J. Miller) and Evan (Adam Pally), Nardo (Thomas Middleditch) follows her down to Mexico where he’s carjacked and left naked in the middle of nowhere. Reluctantly summoning Jason and Evan to help reunite him with his runaway bride-to-be, Nardo becomes involved in an escalating series of outrageous misadventures courtesy of the guys who created the mess in the first place.

Search Party looks hilarious! Check out the trailer:

Now you can win the Search Party Blu-ray!

We Are Movie Geeks has two copies of it to give away! All you have to do is leave a comment below answering this question: What is your favorite movie with the word Party in the title?
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Seth Rogen Acknowledges There Were Jokes In ‘Superbad’ That Were “Blatantly Homophobic”

  • The Playlist
What’s funny today isn’t always funny tomorrow. For every Marx Brothers movie or “Dr. Strangelove” that has aged effortlessly, there’s Peter Sellers in “The Party” or something similar which, due to changing social mores, now feels tin-eared and offensive in their humor. And with people, at least on social media, more aware of causing offense […]

The post Seth Rogen Acknowledges There Were Jokes In ‘Superbad’ That Were “Blatantly Homophobic” appeared first on The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘War Room,’ ‘Coat of Many Colors’ Take Top Prizes at Movieguide Awards

‘War Room,’ ‘Coat of Many Colors’ Take Top Prizes at Movieguide Awards
War Room” and “Dolly Parton’s Coat of Many Colors” were named the most inspiring movie and TV program, respectively, of 2015 at the 24th annual Movieguide Faith & Values Awards.

Each won an Epiphany Prize, which includes a $100,000 honorarium, supported by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation. The awards are sponsored by the Christian Film & Television Commission and recognize uplifting and inspiring movie-television work.

Other winners include Kairos Prizes for spiritually uplifting screenplays by first-time and beginning screenwriters, with the grand prize (worth $25,000) going to Wayne Sable and Christopher Lovick for “Heaven’s Messenger.” First runner-up (worth $15,000) was Harry Keinman for “Wind and a Prayer”; second runner-up (worth $10,000) was Birgit Myaard for “The Hands of a Woman.”

The Chronos Prize for inspiring screenplay by established artists went to Katherine Craddock for “American Exodus.”

Fox’s “Joy” took home the Bradley Foundation faith and freedom award for movies. Also on the film side,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘War Room,’ ‘Coat of Many Colors’ Take Top Prizes at Movieguide Awards

‘War Room,’ ‘Coat of Many Colors’ Take Top Prizes at Movieguide Awards
War Room” and “Dolly Parton’s Coat of Many Colors” were named the most inspiring movie and TV program, respectively, of 2015 at the 24th annual Movieguide Faith & Values Awards.

Each won an Epiphany Prize, which includes a $100,000 honorarium, supported by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation. The awards are sponsored by the Christian Film & Television Commission and recognize uplifting and inspiring movie-television work.

Other winners include Kairos Prizes for spiritually uplifting screenplays by first-time and beginning screenwriters, with the grand prize (worth $25,000) going to Wayne Sable and Christopher Lovick for “Heaven’s Messenger.” First runner-up (worth $15,000) was Harry Keinman for “Wind and a Prayer”; second runner-up (worth $10,000) was Birgit Myaard for “The Hands of a Woman.”

The Chronos Prize for inspiring screenplay by established artists went to Katherine Craddock for “American Exodus.”

Fox’s “Joy” took home the Bradley Foundation faith and freedom award for movies. Also on the film side,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Al Checco, Actor Who Teamed With Don Knotts, Dies at 93

Al Checco, actor and comedy partner of Don Knotts in entertaining U.S. troops overseas during World War II, died at his home in Studio City on July 19. He was 93.

He began his acting and singing career on stage on Broadway in New York City, where he performed in musicals including “Crazy for You,” “Damn Yankees,” “South Pacific,” “Man of La Mancha” and “Showboat” and stage plays including “An Inspector Calls.”

Checco’s films include “Pete’s Dragon” (1977), “Bullitt” (1968), “Hotel” (1967) and “The Party” (1968). His TV credits included guest appearances on “Batman,” “The Rockford Files,” “Adam 12,” “Bonanza,” “Medical Center,” “Love Boat” and “Dallas.”

Earlier he guested several times on “The Andy Griffith Show,” including playing Mort, the bank robber in the episode “The Bank Job.”

Born in Pittsburgh, Checco graduated from the Carnegie Mellon University School of Drama and later provided the funding for the Al Checco Rehearsal

Studio of the
See full article at Variety - TV News »

LatinoBuzz: Shipwrecked! The 2015 San Diego Latino Film Festival Edition!

What do we know about San Diego, California? SeaWorld & Shamu. But wait, that’s not all! The San Diego Latino Film Festival is back with its 22 nd edition and they went all kindsa crazy. New venue, new vibe and jam packed with the best Latino film has to offer. As one of the last Latino film festivals still standing they really made a point to accentuate the spectrum of filmmakers coming out of Latin America and the Us. San Diego Latino has always been a favorite festival of mine as they run on community love and deserve to be celebrated. So, what happens when you abandon Chilenos, Peruanos, Mexicanos, Domincanos, Argentinos y Venezolanos on a deserted island and only allow them one book, an album, a film and a companion from the movies? Read on.

Bernardo Quesney - "Desastres Naturales" (Chile)

Book: The Cement Garden (Ian McEwan). I don´t know if this is my favorite book but it was very important in my adolescence. I felt very close to the main character. Loved by my friends and hated by our parents.

Film: "El Angel Exterminador" by Luis Buñuel. Buñuel is the film director that I want to imitate. I think he is perfect - his sense of humor, his Mexican films. Nothing is "normal" in his cinema. When I read his memoirs I felt that I knew him.

Album: Love in C Minor – Cerrone. Uff! Cerrone is the soundtrack of my everyday walk. It´s simply marvelous. When I put Cerrone in my bedroom I start to dance like John Travolta as Tony Manero. Naked or with boxers.

Companion: Raul Peralta from "Tony Manero." This is a character I feel respects life. It’s so amazing that Raul knows every phrase of that movie. Being Chilean and imitating something from a distant culture is a representation of the Chilean culture. Our nation is an imitation. It’s like we need role models.

Guillermo Zouain - "On the Road, Somewhere" (Algún lugar) (Dominican Republic)

Film: When people ask me what my favorite film is I usually tend to go for "Jaws," "Seven Samurai"or "The Royal Tenenbaums." In this case however I would have to choose "The Breakfast Club," John Hughes is a genius and this movie in particular he guarantees to keep his audience feeling happy, young and rebellious no matter what.

Album: It would be Paul Simon’s Graceland. I think surviving is all about the mood and keeping it happy in my deserted island. Graceland always makes me smile. I’ve been listening to this album since I was a kid and have never grown tired of it. The whole album has a kinetic feel that exudes, transmits and inspires movement. Paul Simon, by Paul Simon, Nashville Skyline by Bob Dylan and Lola vs. Powerman and the Moneygoround part 1 by the Kinks would follow.

Book: Palomar: the Heartbreak Soup Stories, A Love and Rockets Book by Gilbert Hernandez. The good thing about this comic book is that it will give you an array of things: length, many characters, even more details and above all drama and gossip. Palomar’s community of characters will also keep me company while rescue comes. I spent a year reading this book just because I didn’t want it to end.

Companion: I would have to go with Dr. Who, come on the guy speaks all the languages in the universe, has centuries of experience, has been in all kinds of trouble and has a time machine. His sonic screwdriver doesn’t work on wood though.

Enrica Perez - "Climas" (Peru)

Film: If you twist my arm I'd have to pick Almodovar's "Talk to Her." It's not only one of my favorites but the film has also this fate "anything-can-happen" quality and I'm such a drama lover! It would be perfect to be stuck with it on a deserted island. I would never get sick of it.

Album: Without a doubt: The Very Best of Maria Callas. The voice of this woman and the arias of this album on an island… what can I say?… I would wake up in heaven every single day.

Book: I would pick Ernesto Sabato's On Heroes and Tombs. It turned my life upside down when I first read it as a teenager and every time I've read it again I understood something completely different. This book tends to transform and change with time. It's kind of frightening and fantastic at the same time.

Companion: I read in a past quiz someone picked Mary Poppins… damn! That was a good one!!! But to avoid repetition, I would pick Indiana Jones. I mean, c'mon… do I have to explain why?

Gilberto González Penilla - "Los Hamsters" (Mexico)

Film: There are many films I consider favorites but If I had to take just one film to a deserted Island it would be "Cinema Paradiso" for the simple reason it reminds me of the love for cinema and is a film that I can tire of easily.

Album: It would be a Pink Floyd album. That would make me happy and would be perfect for a deserted island to reminisce of my adolescence.

Book: I had it in my mind to choose between a novel or a book of stories, but for the occasion the ideal book would be Notes on Cinematography by Bresson. It’s a book of small notes and thoughts by Bresson. The more I read it I find different meanings of cinema and life itself.

Companion: It would certainly be without doubt Woody Allen. He’s a director whom I admire and surely on a island it would be fun and full of anecdotes.

Humberto Hinojosa – "I Hate Love" (Mexico)

Book: Count of Monte Cristo . It was my first book when I was a child and I have very good memories of it. I enjoy it every time I read it again.

Album: The Beatles Abbey Road. I've heard it my entire life and I have never gotten tired of it. I think it works on an island. I also listen to it with my wife and kids so it would give me hope of rescue.

Companion: Wall-e. I'm sure we would be best friends forever.

Film: If I'm going to be on an island with Wall-e, I'm sure we will have a great time watching "The Party" by Peter Sellers over and over again which would be my choice of a film.

Andrea Herrera Catalá - "Nena, Saludame Al Diego" (Venezuela)

Film: It is an established fact: I can watch "Streets of Fire" five hundred times, and I'll never get bored. Besides, with this film I would bring a little more music to the island!

Companion: Rob Gordon from "High Fidelity." He is quite talkative and he could tell me tons of stories about his life, his girlfriends, the concerts he's been to... He would bring lots of records inside his head, and anecdotes and fun facts about them. It would be like having a never ending music magazine. We would compose new songs, we would do vocal jam sessions and Air Band contests... Until I wanted to kill him, or maybe the other way round.

Book: Cosimo Piovasco, Italo Calvino's Baron in the Trees. I could find new advice from Cosimo every time I read it, on how to live in peace with myself. This book has love, ideology, adventure, battles, joy and sorrow. Everything mixed up in just one big story. I recall I enjoyed a lot when I first read it. I'll let you know how is it going in reading number 1743.

Album: Bocanada by Gustavo Cerati. It is a gem, an amazing record. It is a pleasure listening to it next to the sea, lying under the sun. Cerati deserves a thousand and one tributes.

Emiliano Romero – "Topos" (Argentina)

Book: I feel the need to mention that this list changes permanently, depending entirely on my metamorphosis as a human being. Tengo Miedo Torero (My Tender Matador) by Pedro Lemebel. I would choose this book because it merges social and political reality with fiction. It depicts sensitive characters that have to cope with desires and ideologies. The book makes me want to embrace every single detail of life. It also encourages everyone to defend their right to be whatever they want to be.

Film: "Les Amants du Pont-Neuf" (The Lovers on the Bridge) by Leos Carax. This film manages to transform ugliness and pathos into beauty. Each scene makes me feel the magic of cinema. It really blows people's minds. The actors play their parts in a grotesque-acting style, yet with profound truth.

Album: Transa by Caetano Veloso. This album makes me feel happy. While I listen to it, I realize that the mixture of the different world cultures is really enlightening. Jazz, Rock, Bossa Nova, Tango, lots of talent and Latin blood.

Companion: Cosmo Kramer from TV series "Seinfeld." I would choose him because he always does what he feels. He never censors himself, nor thinks twice about things. He loves what he does and does what he loves to do, always. Besides, I think that the physical work of the actor is absolutely brilliant.

Check out the roster: http://sdlatinofilm.com/2015/

Written by Juan Caceres . LatinoBuzz is a feature on SydneysBuzz that highlights Latino indie talent and upcoming trends in Latino film with the specific objective of presenting a broad range of Latino voices. Follow [At]LatinoBuzz on Twitter and Facebook
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

DVD Review: "The Prisoner Of Zenda" (1979) Starring Peter Sellers And Elke Sommer; Universal Vault DVD Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Although he was regarded as a comedy genius, the sad truth is that Peter Sellers was more often than not misused in big screen comedies. After making it big on British TV  and in feature films in the late 1950s, Sellers became an international sensation with his acclaimed work in big studio feature films such as "Lolita", "Dr. Strangelove", "The World of Henry Orient" and the first entries in the "Pink Panther" series. Through the mid-Sixties, he did impressive work in films like "After the Fox", "The Wrong Box" and "What's New Pussycat?" If the films weren't classics, at least they presented some of Sellers' off-the-wall ability to deliver innovative characters and comedic situations. By the late Sixties, however, his own personal demons began to get the better of him. Sellers was the epitome of the classic clown: laughing on the outside but crying on the inside.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Film Nerd 2.0 tackles sci-fi and silly waiters in a double-feature double-header

  • Hitfix
Film Nerd 2.0 tackles sci-fi and silly waiters in a double-feature double-header
It's Tuesday night, and I'm alone in my apartment for the first time in four days. It was nice to spend that kind of stretch with the boys after being at Sundance, and every day, we had things to do. There was a Super Bowl party, our first together, and an all-media screening of "The Spongebob Movie: Sponge Out Of Water," as well as a play date with their buddies Dash and Beck. There was also always, though, a constant pressure to watch something. It's not from me, either. They are voracious, and now that they've got their own shelf of movies that they haven't seen but are allowed to see at the apartment, they are always in the middle of some negotiation with me about what they're going to watch and when. Lately, they've become infatuated with the idea of the double-feature, and I've learned that the best way
See full article at Hitfix »

The Party | Blu-ray Review

  • ioncinema
While director Blake Edwards and star Peter Sellers are best known for their several Pink Panther efforts, they also collaborated on one additional wholly unrelated title, The Party (1968). It was their third time working together, with only two of the Panther films preceding it, and arriving the same year that Bud Yorkin attempted an unsuccessful Us version of the Clouseau character starring Alan Arkin with Inspector Clouseau. For the most part, this is a film that allows Sellers free reign with his fake persona, though by today’s standards this might play something like an SNL extended skit feature. Though Sellers was a top tier performer, many may likely find his appearance here in ‘brown face’ as a bumbling Indian actor to be off-putting, even if it isn’t pointedly demeaning.

The story is about as simple as the unassuming title. Hrundi V. Bakshi (Sellers) is an Indian actor in Hollywood,
See full article at ioncinema »
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