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Film Review: ‘Bad Match’

Film Review: ‘Bad Match’
It’s a sign of how little most movies channel contemporary experience that the manners and habits and attitudes of the age of Tinder have remained a relatively off-screen topic. This past January, the Sundance drama “Newness,” directed by Drake Doremus (it has yet to be released), was a designer soap opera that had a few telling observations to make about what it feels like to live your life in a digital meat market. As a movie, though, it didn’t quite take hold. The new pulp thriller “Bad Match” is darker, grimier, and more entertaining. Written and directed by David Chirchirillo, who co-wrote the scurrilous violent hipster comedy “Cheap Thrills” (2013), the movie is “Fatal Attraction” for the age of the revolving-door hook-up, and in its fevered low-budget way it’s just clever enough to do what it sets out to do. It gives toxic masculinity its just desserts.

Jack Cutmore-Scott, who suggests
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Hammer Vol. 1 – Fear Warning!

Starting out in 1939 as the little studio that could, Hammer would finally make their reputation in the late fifties reimagining Universal’s black and white horrors as eye-popping Technicolor gothics – their pictorial beauty, thanks to cameramen like Jack Asher and Arthur Ibbetson, was fundamental to the studio’s legacy. So it’s been more than a little frustrating to see such disrespect visited upon these films by home video companies happy to smother the market with grainy prints, incoherent cropping and under-saturated colors. The House of Hammer and the film community in general deserve far better than that.

Thanks to Indicator, the home video arm of Powerhouse films based in the UK, those wrongs are beginning to be righted, starting with their impressive new release of Hammer shockers, Fear Warning! Even better news for stateside fans; the set is region-free, ready to be relished the world over.

Hammer Vol. 1 – Fear Warning!
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

'Alfie': THR's 1966 Review

'Alfie': THR's 1966 Review
On Aug. 24, 1966, Paramount brought Michael Caine's Alfie to theaters. The film went on to be nominated for five Oscars at the 39th Academy Awards ceremony, including best picture and actor. The Hollywood Reporter's original review is below.

Alfie is a contemporary Tom Jones, a young man pursuing what he calls the "birds" with relentless and apparently inexhaustible energy. His object is sex: cheery and irresponsible. He is caught up and changed when he finds responsibility is inescapable. Lewis Gilbert's production for Paramount is an amusing, moving and meaningful picture.

Although for much of the way it tinkles...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

‘Fleabag’: How Phoebe Waller-Bridge Plans to Change The Show Everyone Loves in Season 2

‘Fleabag’: How Phoebe Waller-Bridge Plans to Change The Show Everyone Loves in Season 2
If you were hooked on “Fleabag,” one of the more striking British TV imports in the streaming era, odds are good it happened the first time Phoebe Waller-Bridge stared right into camera. As much as that stylistic choice came to cement Waller-Bridge’s unique connection with audiences in her home country and abroad, there was no guarantee that Fleabag’s instantly iconic fourth-wall moments would stick around.

“I always told myself the rule I had was that she only needed the camera there because she was constantly on the verge of needing to confess,” Waller-Bridge said of the character she writes and performs herself.

Confess what, exactly? Well, Season 1 of the Amazon series ends with Fleabag acknowledging an unexpected role she played in driving her best friend Boo to suicide.

“That was such a defining part of the show, looking at the camera, but I can’t bring myself, even as an actor,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Fleabag’: How Phoebe Waller-Bridge Plans to Change The Show Everyone Loves in Season 2

  • Indiewire
‘Fleabag’: How Phoebe Waller-Bridge Plans to Change The Show Everyone Loves in Season 2
If you were hooked on “Fleabag,” one of the more striking British TV imports in the streaming era, odds are good it happened the first time Phoebe Waller-Bridge stared right into camera. As much as that stylistic choice came to cement Waller-Bridge’s unique connection with audiences in her home country and abroad, there was no guarantee that Fleabag’s instantly iconic fourth-wall moments would stick around.

“I always told myself the rule I had was that she only needed the camera there because she was constantly on the verge of needing to confess,” Waller-Bridge said of the character she writes and performs herself.

Confess what, exactly? Well, Season 1 of the Amazon series ends with Fleabag acknowledging an unexpected role she played in driving her best friend Boo to suicide.

“That was such a defining part of the show, looking at the camera, but I can’t bring myself, even as an actor,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Essential British Films

Tom Jolliffe on the essential British films…

Article 50 is due to drop soon. Britain flies the Euro coop. With that in mind, and more importantly because any time is a good time to acknowledge it, I thought I would list my essential British films. I’ve collated a list of not only my favourites, but hopefully a diverse mix that represents British cinema at its finest. It’s obviously a very difficult task because whilst I may be bias as a Brit, it goes without saying that we have a very commendable cinematic legacy here. We’ve had our share of classics and delivered an array of film icons such as James Bond (note…whilst I adore the legacy and there have been some classic Jb films, I’ve opted for a slightly less obvious listing).

Without further ado, here are my essential British films:

Withnail & I

Any film student
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Brit New Wave Classics ‘A Hard Day’s Night,’ ‘Alfie’ and More Get Swinging at New Festival — Watch Trailer

  • Indiewire
Brit New Wave Classics ‘A Hard Day’s Night,’ ‘Alfie’ and More Get Swinging at New Festival — Watch Trailer
British cinema probably isn’t the main cultural wave that most people associate with the ’60s, but New York City’s own Film Forum is seeking to rectify that with their upcoming film festival, The Brit New Wave. Spanning over 16 days with 30 films on the slate, the festival is honoring an eclectic and varied time in film history.

Read More: How the SXSW 2017 Film Festival Shows Us the Future of the Movies

The festival will screen films such as the Beatles classic “A Hard Day’s Night,” Laurence Olivier’s “The Entertainer,” Michael Caine’s “Alfie,” Anne Bancroft’s “The Pumpkin Eater,” as well as films from Vanessa Redgrave, Richard Burton, and the debuts of Albert Finney, Julie Christie, and Alan Bates.

Additionally, the theater will also give a special run to the new restoration of John Schlesinger’s debut feature, the rarely-seen kitchen sink drama “A King of Loving,
See full article at Indiewire »

September Storm — 3-D

3-D in CinemaScope? That seems like a strange combination, but this obscure treasure hunt adventure with Joanne Dru and Mark Stevens is indeed billed as being filmed in the ‘Miracle of Stereo-Vision,’ five years after the demise of Hollywood’s first fling with ‘depthies.’ Kino and the 3-D Film Archives extras include two vintage 3-D shorts, one of them never screened in 3-D.

September Storm

3-D Blu-ray

Kino Classics

1960 / Color / 2:39 widescreen / 92 min. / Street Date March 28, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 34.95

Starring: Joanne Dru, Mark Stevens, Robert Strauss Asher Dann, Jean-Pierre Kérien, Véra Valmont..

Cinematography: Lamar Boren, Jorge Stahl Jr.

Film Editor: Alberto Valenzuela

Art Direction: Boris Leven

Underwater director: Paul Stader

Original Music: Edward L. Alperson Jr., Raoul Kraushaar

Written by W.R. Burnett from a story by Steve Fisher

Produced by Edward L. Alperson

Directed by Byron Haskin

The 3-D Film Archive has been an amazing resource for the fascinating depth format,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Top Five Films That Influenced Change

I Daniel Blake

Ken Loach’s I, Daniel Blake (releasing on DVD and Blu-ray 27th February) lays bare the cruel realities for those who fall through the cracks of society. With the film resulting in much topical debate, we take a look at five films that have influenced change following its release to screen:

Alfie

In the 1966 original (not the remake), Julia Foster’s character Gilda undergoes a harrowing abortion – carried out in a back room in Alfie’s (Michael Caine) flat. At the time, abortion was illegal in the UK, and the procedure is seen to be carried out by a “back-street” abortionist.

“Backstreet abortions” were outlawed in the UK with the introduction of the 1967 Abortion Act. Although not openly stated, Alfie’s conscience when he saw the results of a botched operation is arguably a contributor to this, as – coincidentally – the film released months before the law began to change.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Two for the Road

Two for the Road

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1967 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 111 min. / Street Date January 10, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Audrey Hepburn, Albert Finney, Eleanor Bron, William Daniels, Claude Dauphin, Nadia Gray

Cinematography: Christopher Challis

Art Direction: Marc Frederic, Willy Holt

Film Editor: Madeleine Gug

Original Music: Henry Mancini

Written by Frederic Raphael

Produced and Directed by Stanley Donen

Some so-called sophisticated ‘sixties romantic dramas have dated pretty badly, as it’s not easy to create a movie acceptable to a fickle audience, that doesn’t end up with attitudes, politics or even costumes that don’t look ‘wrong’ just a few years later. I’ve found that enjoying Audrey Hepburn’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s takes a conscious act of selective blindness. The music, the style, the images were swooningly vital to an audience perhaps ten years older than this reviewer. Hepburn’s ravishing Holly Golightly misses
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

DVD Review – The Small World of Sammy Lee (1963)

The Small World Of Sammy Lee, 1963.

Directed by Ken Hughes.

Starring Anthony Newley, Julia Foster and Robert Stephens.

Synopsis:

The compère of a seedy strip club struggles to keep one step ahead of the bookies to whom he owes money.

Before video came along, the only way to see a film was at the cinema or on TV. As such as soon as the dawn of home release (with VHS evolving into DVD’s, and now Blu-ray) came, there was an entire history of film to catch up on in terms of releasing. The more iconic films would take precedent, or the box office success. Or some older films could be caught in a mire of rights issues due to folded companies or sold rights. British cinema boomed in the 60’s, yet finding available releases of some lost nuggets of gold can be tough and good releases even more difficult.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

A Taste of Honey

Elfin Rita Tushingham makes a smash film debut as Shelagh Delaney's dispirited working class teen, on her own in Manchester and unprepared for the harsh truths of life. It's one of the best of the British New Wave. A Taste of Honey Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 829 1961 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 100 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date August 23, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Rita Tushingham, Dora Bryan, Paul Danquah, Murray Melvin, Robert Stephens. Cinematography Walter Lassally Film Editor Anthony Gibbs Original Music John Addison Written by Tony Richardson and Shelagh Delaney adapted from her stage play Produced and directed by Tony Richardson

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

The British New Wave got a real shot in the arm with 1961's A Taste of Honey. A stubbornly realistic drama about life in the lower working classes of Manchester, it was adapted from a near-revolutionary play by Shelagh Delaney, produced by Joan Littlewood. Here in
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Destiny's Child Alum LeToya Luckett to Play Dionne Warwick in Upcoming Biopic - Also Costarring Lady Gaga as Cilla Black!

  • PEOPLE.com
Destiny's Child Alum LeToya Luckett to Play Dionne Warwick in Upcoming Biopic - Also Costarring Lady Gaga as Cilla Black!
Former Destiny's Child member LeToya Luckett has signed on to play Dionne Warwick in a new biopic about the legendary singer that is set to costar Lady Gaga, it was announced at the Cannes Film Festival Friday morning, according to The Hollywood Reporter. The film, aptly titled Dionne, will follow the singer's early career spanning from 1962-1968, during which time she created some of her biggest hits including "Alfie" and "I Say a Little Prayer." Warwick, 75, said she was pleased that Luckett would portray her on the big screen. "She is perfect and she has exactly the right look," Warwick said at the film festival,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Lady Gaga to play Cilla Black on the big screen

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A new movie about Dionne Warwick will feature Lady Gaga as British icon of music and television Cilla Black...

In a slice of unexpected news, Lady Gaga is set to play Cilla Black in a new big screen movie. The pop star and American Horror Story: Hotel actress will appear as Cilla in a film about American singer, TV host and Un ambassador Dionne Warwick.

From Cannes, the BBC reports that Dionne Warwick will be played by original Destiny’s Child member LeToya Luckett. Lady Gaga’s Cilla won’t be the main character of the movie, but instead a rival to Luckett’s Dionne.

Upon being asked why she considers the late Cilla Black her nemesis, Dionne Warwick is quoted as saying "because she stole my music". She was probably referring to the fact that Cilla’s cover version of Anyone Who Had A Heart held
See full article at Den of Geek »

Cannes: Dionne Warwick Movie Causes Casting Scandal For Lady Gaga

Cannes: Dionne Warwick Movie Causes Casting Scandal For Lady Gaga
On Friday morning, at the Cannes Film Festival, Dionne Warwick appeared before a room of journalists to announce her new biopic “Dionne.” She proudly revealed that LeToya Luckett (one of the original members of Destiny’s Child) would be playing her, and that Lady Gaga would be portraying the late singer Cilla Black. Warwick went on to describe the character as “her nemesis.” “She stole my songs,” Warwick said of Black. “I was not a very happy camper about that.”

She’s not the only one. A few hours later, Lady Gaga’s publicist issued a statement, saying that the “Born This Way Singer” was not attached to the movie and would not be taking the role. According to a source, Gaga wasn’t even aware of the film.

The (fake) news of Gaga’s attachment to the film made international headlines. When Warwick presented the project, she stood in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oh! What a Lovely War

A pure-gold Savant favorite, Sir Richard Attenborough's first feature as director is a stylized pacifist epic of the insane tragedy of WW1, told through contemporary songs, with the irreverent lyrics given them by the soldiers themselves. And one will not want to miss a young Maggie Smith's music hall performance -- luring young conscripts to doom in the trenches. It's the strangest pacifist film ever, done in high style. Oh! What a Lovely War DVD The Warner Archive Collection 1969 / Color / 2:35 enhanced widescreen / 144 min. / Street Date September 22, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 16.99 Starring: Too many to name, see below. Cinematography Gerry Turpin Production Design Donald M. Ashton Art Direction Harry White Choreography Eleanor Fazan Film Editor Kevin Connor Original Music Alfred Ralston Written by Len Deighton from the musical play by Joan Littlewood from the radio play by Charles Chilton Produced by Richard Attenborough, Brian Duffy, Len Deighton Directed
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Michael Caine to receive rare Efa honour

  • ScreenDaily
Michael Caine to receive rare Efa honour
European Film Academy to award “long overdue” honour to veteran British actor.

Sir Michael Caine is to be presented with the Honorary Award of the Efa President and Board at the 28th European Film Awards - only the third time the honour as been bestowed in nearly 30 years.

The British actor, whose 60-year career has run from Alfie and The Italian Job to The Dark Knight trilogy, will accept the award at the EFAs on Dec 12 in Berlin.

Caine is also nominated for his performance in Paolo Sorrentino’s Youth. He was previously nominated in 2001 for Fred Schepisi’s Last Orders.

In a joint statement, Efa Board chair Agnieszka Holland and Efa President Wim Wenders said: “We have come to the decision that we are long overdue on paying special tribute to Sir Michael Caine.

“This recognition to an outstanding film personality is coming from the bottom of our hearts and has only been presented twice in the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Michael Caine to recieve rare Efa honour

  • ScreenDaily
Michael Caine to recieve rare Efa honour
European Film Academy to award “long overdue” honour to veteran British actor.

Sir Michael Caine is to be presented with the Honorary Award of the Efa President and Board at the 28th European Film Awards - only the third time the honour as been bestowed in nearly 30 years.

The British actor, whose 60-year career has run from Alfie and The Italian Job to The Dark Knight trilogy, will accept the award at the EFAs on Dec 12 in Berlin.

Caine is also nominated for his performance in Paolo Sorrentino’s Youth. He was previously nominated in 2001 for Fred Schepisi’s Last Orders.

In a joint statement, Efa Board chair Agnieszka Holland and Efa President Wim Wenders said: “We have come to the decision that we are long overdue on paying special tribute to Sir Michael Caine.

“This recognition to an outstanding film personality is coming from the bottom of our hearts and has only been presented twice in the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Michael Caine to Receive European Film Academy Honorary Award

Michael Caine to Receive European Film Academy Honorary Award
London — Michael Caine will be presented with the Honorary Award of the European Film Academy president and board at the European Film Awards ceremony on Dec. 12. It is only the third time the award has been bestowed in almost 30 years.

Agnieszka Holland, chairwoman of the European Film Academy board, and Efa president Wim Wenders said in a statement: “We have come to the decision that we are long overdue on paying special tribute to Sir Michael Caine. This recognition to an outstanding film personality is coming from the bottom of our hearts, and has only been presented twice in the almost 30 years of the European Film Awards: to our founding member Manoel de Oliveira and to Michel Piccoli.”

Caine has performed in more than 100 films. His most memorable roles include the spy Harry Palmer in “The Ipcress File” (1965), womanizer “Alfie” (1966), the gangster Charlie Croker in “The Italian Job” (1969), the hairdresser
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Eleanor Bron: 'I didn't want to be like other little girls'

She satirised the 60s alongside Peter Cook and appeared onscreen in classics from Alfie to Women in Love. Bron talks Corbyn, ‘consorts’, and what the Beatles taught her about fame

Eleanor Bron – delicate, poised and with fathomless, deep-hooded eyes – has had a long career. It stretches back to the satire boom of the 1960s, through a constellation of films such as Ken Russell’s Women in Love and Terence Davies’s The House of Mirth and up to this month, in rehearsals for a play at the Bush theatre in London. But the absolute keynote of performing, she says, is still “dread”. Acting “is terribly exposing”. The fear doesn’t wear off with experience? “It gets worse as one gets older. You have what I call peripherals – some of the constant peripherals are the dread, the fear, the constant possibility of failure. Of letting other people down, that is the main thing.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
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