L'Eclisse (1962) - News Poster

(1962)

News

Filmadrid & Mubi: The Video Essay—"L’eclisse Lines"

The Video Essay is a joint project of Mubi and Filmadrid Festival Internacional de Cine. Film analysis and criticism found a completely new and innovative path with the arrival of the video essay, a relatively recent form that already has its own masters and is becoming increasingly popular. The limits of this discipline are constantly expanding; new essayists are finding innovative ways to study the history of cinema working with images. With this non-competitive section of the festival both Mubi and Filmadrid will offer the platform and visibility the video essay deserves. The seven selected works will be shown during the dates of Filmadrid (June 8 - 17, 2017) on Mubi’s cinema publication, the Notebook. Also there will be a free public screening of the selected works during the festival. The selection was made by the programmers of Mubi and Filmadrid.L'eclisse LinesA video essay by Hannah LeißA video essay on the
See full article at MUBI »

Filmadrid & Mubi: The Video Essay—"Telefoni Neri"

The Video Essay is a joint project of Mubi and Filmadrid Festival Internacional de Cine. Film analysis and criticism found a completely new and innovative path with the arrival of the video essay, a relatively recent form that already has its own masters and is becoming increasingly popular. The limits of this discipline are constantly expanding; new essayists are finding innovative ways to study the history of cinema working with images. With this non-competitive section of the festival both Mubi and Filmadrid will offer the platform and visibility the video essay deserves. The seven selected works will be shown during the dates of Filmadrid (June 8 - 17, 2017) on Mubi’s cinema publication, the Notebook. Also there will be a free public screening of the selected works during the festival. The selection was made by the programmers of Mubi and Filmadrid.Telefoni NeriA video essay by Hannah LeißAs a reaction to the
See full article at MUBI »

Le amiche (The Girlfriends)

Michelangelo Antonioni's pre-international breakthrough drama is as good as anything he's done, a flawlessly acted and directed story of complex relationships -- that include his 'career' themes before the existential funk set in. It's one of the best-blocked dramatic films ever... the direction is masterful. Le amiche Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 817 1955 / B&W / 1:37 flat full frame / 106 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date June 7, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Eleonora Rossi Drago, Gabriele Ferzetti, Franco Fabrizi, Valentina Cortese, Madeleine Fischer, Yvonne Furneaux, Anna Maria Pancani, Luciano Volpato, Maria Gambarelli, Ettore Manni. Cinematography Gianni De Venanzo Film Editor Eraldo Da Roma Original Music Giovanni Fusco Written by Suso Cecchi D'Amico, Michelangelo Antonioni, Alba de Cespedes from a book by Cesare Pavese Produced by Giovanni Addessi Directed by Michelangelo Antonioni

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

It's time to stop being so intimidated by Michelangelo Antonioni. His epics of existential alienation La notte, L'eclisse and
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Weekly Rushes. 27 January 2016

  • MUBI
Rushes collects news, articles, images, videos and more for a weekly roundup of essential items from the world of film.NEWSThe big news in Hollywood is that "the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences has approved a series of major changes, in terms of voting and recruitment, also adding three new seats to the 51-person board — all part of a goal to double the number of women and diverse members of the Academy by 2020. The changes were approved by the board Thursday night in an emergency meeting," Variety reports. A major step, certainly, but we've still to see what the results will be. And certainly Academy membership does little to alter what kinds of movies get produced and by whom.Charles Silver, the head of the Museum of Modern Art's Film Study Center, passed away last week. IndieWire is running an homage by Laurence Kardish, a former MoMA film curator:"Perhaps,
See full article at MUBI »

Daily | Flicker Alley, Film-Philosophy, Books

Flicker Alley's posted a round of essays and interviews in conjunction with its release of its collection of American avant-garde works on DVD and Blu-ray. Discussed here are Stan Brakhage, Bruce Baillie, Lawrence Jordan, Joseph Cornell, Maya Deren, Shirley Clarke and more. Also in today's roundup: Books on Werner Herzog, Groucho Marx, Marlene Dietrich and Leni Riefenstahl, Orson Welles, Woody Allen, David Hare and Christopher Isherwood; new Film-Philosophy essays on Michelangelo Antonioni's L'Eclisse, Busby Berkeley, Paul Thomas Anderson's There Will Be Blood and Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven, Richard Kelly's Donnie Darko, Tim Burton's Edward Scissorhands, Wes Anderson's Fantastic Mr. Fox and Samuel Beckett. And more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

6 European Art House Films to Prepare You for 'By the Sea'

6 European Art House Films to Prepare You for 'By the Sea'
Read More: 'By the Sea,' Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt's European Marital Adventure, Opens AFI Fest "La Notte" (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1961) In the long tradition of art house cinema, including Antonioni's own "L'Avventura" and "L'Eclisse," "La Notte" is an evocative drama built entirely on mood and spiraling feelings. Marcello Mastroianni and Jeanne Moreau play an unfaithful married couple whose relationship deteriorates over the course of a long day filled with temptation from suitors and longing for the connection they once shared. Upon first introduction, the couple seems to have it all; Mastroianni's Giovanni is an acclaimed writer who has recently published his latest novel, while Moreau's Lidia is a sultry beauty. A master of observation, Antonioni fills the picture with long silences and drawn out scenes that expose the ruins of the couple's interior state. As each finds...
See full article at Indiewire »

Daily | Goings On | Wenders, Rohmer, Antonioni

Janus Films premieres its Wim Wenders retrospective in New York today, featuring new restorations of such classics as Paris, Texas and Wings of Desire as well as the director's cut of Until the End of the World. More goings on: an Eric Rohmer series in New York with The Marquise of O as its centerpiece; Penelope Spheeris presents her work in Austin; Michelangelo Antonioni's L'Eclisse is being revived across the UK; plus new horror in London and French crime thrillers in Vienna. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Film Review: 'L'Eclisse'

  • CineVue
★★★★☆ There are some films that are defined, or at least deeply coloured by the power and poetry of their final scenes. Christian Petzold's Phoenix (2014) is a fine film in its own right, but is elevated by the emotional upper-cut of its conclusion. So too Pablo Larrain's Post Mortem (2010) conjures great effect from its chilling last shot. It may not be a given that Michelangelo Antonioni is emphasising what has come before in the incredible closing minutes of L'Eclisse (1962), but a case can be made that in it he unsettlingly distils his entire trilogy of alienation - begun in L'Avventura (1960) and continued in La Notte (1961) - into one poetic and wordless sequence.
See full article at CineVue »

Martin Scorsese's 39 Foreign Films to See Before You Die

Martin Scorsese's 39 Foreign Films to See Before You Die
An oldie, but a goodie. Open Culture resurfaced this list (below) sent from director Martin Scorsese to a budding young filmmaker. Let's appraise it. Italian directors are well-represented but this list needs some Bertolucci ("The Conformist," for one, though his early "Before the Revolution" makes the cut) and Pasolini ("Salo" or "Teorema" for weaker stomachs). What about Antonioni's "L'eclisse"? The last ten minutes or so, when neither Alain Delon or Monica Vitti show up for their appointed date at a water fountain, are a formally radical must-have for aspiring directors. And no Fellini? Bergman? Come on Marty. There's a real dearth of women on here. Where's Chantal Akerman, director of the mind-blowing "Jeanne Dielman"? Or Agnes Varda, whose "Cleo From 5 to 7" and others have inspired innumerable present-day indie filmmakers. Scorsese seems to be limiting himself to two films per director -- though Godard (why...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

'Stretch', 'Expendables 3', 'The Giver' & 'November Man' on DVD & Blu-ray This Week

Stretch I don't know what happened at Universal when it came to Joe Carnahan's Stretch, but they really decided to bury it. They didn't market it, delayed it's release date, tried to dump it, finally released it as a streaming only title and now it comes to DVD (no Blu-ray) without any notice. I didn't know it was coming out today until ten minutes before posting this article. As anyone that reads this site regularly knows, I liked this movie. It's a batsh*t fun good time, give my review a read and see if it's up your alley.

The Giver I just have no interest in this film and that's a little weird I think considering it's directed by Phillip Noyce and stars the likes of Meryl Streep and Jeff Bridges, but I just can't bring myself to be interested.

The November Man Remember when there was going
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Barnes & Noble 50% Off Criterion Sale 2014! Top Titles to Buy!

It's that time of year again and it's time to update the list for the second half of 2014 as Barnes & Noble has just kicked off their 50% off Criterion sale and as impossible a task as it is to cut things down to just a few titles, I have done my best to break Criterion's titles down into a few categories. Hopefully those looking for box sets, specific directors or what I think are absolute musts will find this makes things a little bit easier. Let's get to it... First Picks I was given the Zatoichi collection for Christmas last year and being a collection that holds 25 films and another disc full of supplementary material it is the absolute definition of a must buy when it comes to the Criterion Collection. It is, once again, on sale for $112.49, half off the Msrp of $224.99, and worth every penny. I spent the entire year going through it.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

'It Happened One Night', 'Tootsie' and 'L'avventura' Coming to Criterion in November

Criterion has announced their November slate of releases and among them is Frank Capra's romantic-comedy classic It Happened One Night and Blu-ray upgrade of Michelangelo Antonioni's L'avventura and Sydney Pollack's Tootsie starring Dustin Hoffman. First off, and most exciting as far as I'm concerned, is Capra's It Happened One Night, which I speculated previously would be added to the collection sooner rather than later. Starring Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert, this is an all-timer in terms of romantic comedies and Criterion is delivering it with an all new 4K digital restoration, new conversation between critics Molly Haskell and Phillip Lopate, the 1997 feature-length documentary Frank Capra's American Dream, Capra's first film, the 1922 silent short The Ballad of Fisher's Boarding House, the American Film Institute's tribute to Capra from 1982 and the film's trailer. The release arrives on November 18. The other title I'm excited about is Antonioni's L'avventura, the
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Ros Journal (6/12/14): Portrayal of the Classes in Film

I was watching the Michelangelo Antonioni documentary "The Eye that Changed Cinema" that comes included with Criterion's L'eclisse Blu-ray when Antonioni said something that intrigued me: What's the difference between the human being who does one job and the human being who does anotherc Between the person who has money and the one who doesn'tc I've taken Antonioni's questions a little out of context, but the point remains, what about the differences in how rich and poor are portrayed on screenc Whether it's just in the color treatment of the film or the vibrancy of the characters' surroundingsc Do you think they are treated equally and fairlyc restrict paid="true" When it comes to black-and-white films, the portrayals of a lavish lifestyle were frequently defined solely by a person's means -- the car they drive, the house they live in, the clothes they wear, etc. Certainly in some situations the lights shine brighter,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

New DVD Blu-ray: 'Cosmos,' 'True Detective,' 'All That Heaven Allows'

Moviefone's Top DVD of the Week

"True Detective: The Complete First Season"

What's It About? This creepy HBO series stars Woody Harrelson and

Matthew McConaughey as troubled detectives on the hunt for a killer in 1995, and as the possible subjects of an investigation in the present day. The crazy conspiracies and weird worldviews presented by writer/creator Nic Pizzolatto and the masterful direction by Cary Fukunaga make this a series to obsess over. Time overlaps as our antagonists and their associates are interviewed in the

Why We're In: The Internet exploded with theories about "True Detective," and although they didn't necessarily prove to be fruitful, there's still plenty to examine and re-examine in each episode. Plus, there are audio commentaries, deleted scenes, interviews, and other behind-the-scenes goodies.

Moviefone's Top Blu-ray of the Week

"All That Heaven Allows" (Criterion)

What's It About? Jane Wyman stars as a rich widow named
See full article at Moviefone »

What I Watched, What You Watched #248

This week it was all theatrical screenings for me. I caught Edge of Tomorrow and The Fault in Our Stars during the week and yesterday morning I saw How to Train Your Dragon 2 before heading to the Paramount Theatre for the stage version of "Once", which I enjoyed, but did have a few issues with. Otherwise I did watch the first episode of "Sherlock's" third season as it just came available on Netflix Instant and I watched about half of Michelangelo Antonioni's L'Eclisse on Criterion Blu-ray as it hits shelves next week and I will have a review for you, hopefully as it comes out, but it is feature rich and I will have to carve out some time. Oh, and I've started reading "L.A. Noir: The Struggle for the Soul of America's Most Seductive City", but I'm only 10% of the way through so I don't really
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Criterion Celebrates the Beatles with 'A Hard Day's Night' Among Its June Releases

Criterion Celebrates the Beatles with 'A Hard Day's Night' Among Its June Releases
For Beatles fans out there, Criterion is celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of "A Hard Day's Night" by releasing a new 4K digital restoration of the film, with a newly remixed 5.1 surround soundtrack. Among the accompanying special features are a deleted scene, audio commentary, trailers, and a documentary program. The postmodern masterpiece, "L'Eclisse," by famed Italian director Michelangelo Antonioni, will also be released, in addition to Douglas Sirk's "All That Heaven Allows," Peter Davis's "Hearts and Minds," Georges Franju’s "Judex," and Peter Weir's "Picnic at Hanging Rock."Please find below the details for each film (provided by Criterion): All That Heaven Allows (Dual-format Blu-ray/DVD Edition) This heartbreakingly beautiful indictment of 1950s American mores by Douglas Sirk (Written on the Wind) follows the blossoming love between a well-off suburban widow (Magnificent Obsession’s Jane Wyman) and her handsome and earthy younger gardener (Seconds’...
See full article at Indiewire »

'Picnic at Hanging Rock', 'L'eclisse' and 'Hard Days Night' Coming from Criterion in June 2014

I just received my review copy of Ingmar Bergman's Pesona (3/25) today so I'm a little high on Criterion love at the moment and only minutes after receiving that in the mail I received today's announcement listing the films coming to the Collection in June. I'm sure many will be excited to see Peter Weir's Picnic at Hanging Rock getting the Blu-ray upgrade. The remastered release includes a new piece on the making of the film, a new introduction by film scholar David Thomson as well as Weir's 1971 black comedy Homesdale among other additional features. The disc will hit shelves on June 17. The title I'm most looking forward to is Michelangelo Antonioni's L'eclisse the third film in his informal trilogy that includes L'avventura and La notte. This is the only one of those three I haven't yet seen and what a cast as it tells the story of
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

The Criterion Collection Announces Its June Titles

The Criterion Collection has announced two new titles and four Blu-ray upgrades set for release in June. Check out the new cover art along with a full list of extra features for each in the gallery viewer below! Debuting in the collection are both Richard Lester's iconic Beatles film A Hard Day's Night and Georges Franju's 1963 adaptation of the pulp hero Judex . Upgrading to Blu-ray are Douglas Sirk's All That Heaven Allows , Michelangelo Antonioni's L'eclisse , Peter Weir's Picnic at Hanging Rock and Peter Davis's documentary Hearts and Minds , returning to the collection after years of being out of print. Special features for the new releases are listed as follows: A Hard Day's Night - New 4K digital film restoration, approved by director Richard Lester,...
See full article at Comingsoon.net »

'La Notte' (Criterion Collection) Blu-ray Review

La Notte (1961) is the first film from Michelangelo Antonioni I've seen more than once. Outside of L'Eclisse and The Passenger, I've seen all of what I presume most would call his "classics" -- L'Avventura, Il Grido, Red Desert and Blow-Up -- though I'm no Antonioni scholar as much as I am a fan. His works aren't immediately approachable and must be left to their own devices, to reveal their secrets at their own pace and under those circumstances La Notte delivers a smashing finale. Explained simply, this is a story of a man and his wife (Marcello Mastroianni and Jeanne Moreau) who appear to have fallen out of love with one another. Taking place over the course of less than 24 hours very little happens in this film in the way of "action" as so much of what is actually going on is taking place inside the heads of the film's two leads.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

'Monsters University', 'La Notte', 'R.I.P.D.' and 'Byzantium' on DVD and Blu-ray This Week

La Notte (Criterion Collection) I just posted my review of Criterion's new release of Michelangelo Antonioni's La Notte, and as a fan of his work I can tell you this may be my favorite film of his. Perhaps that's only because it's the first of his movies I've watched a second time and not having seen L'Eclisse or The Passenger there are still likely candidates to rise in the ranks. I would like to say this is his most accessible film I've seen, even though it comes with an extraordinarily slow pace. I'm sure others would argue Blow-Up may be more accessible, but I almost suspect the more thrilling aspects of that feature may be lost on a crowd more interested in CG explosions and men in tights. Either way, this story of a married couple and their deteriorating relationship is one that gets better and better as the minutes tick by.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites