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Criterion Now – Episode 34 – The Music Geek Episode, Festival

Aaron is joined by David Blakeslee and Matt Gasteier as they take a detour from Criterion to talk about art music in general. We tie it to the label by doing a bracket challenge for the best Criterion music on disc, but we also talk about our personal experiences and tastes in music, and have a short debate about whether rock is dead. We include some Criterion news and FilmStruck, including Peter Becker’s interview and some recent Oop titles on streaming.

Episode Notes

11:30 – Our Music Backgrounds

33:45 – The Criterion Music Bracket Challenge

40:40 – Piece of Flair (Flipper, Bjork, The Strokes)

54:30 – Short Takes (Science is Fiction, Koyaanisqatsi, Inside Llewyn Davis)

1:03:00 – Murray Lerner’s Festival

1:23:00 – Is Rock Dead?

1:50:00 – FilmStruck

Episode Links Criterion Reflections Podcast CriterionCast 186: An Autumn Afternoon Criterion Close-Up 61 – The Rose The Criterion Completion – Hour 8 Matt Gasteier – 33 1/3 Nas’ Illmatic The Focus
See full article at CriterionCast »

Episode 186 – Yasujiro Ozu’s An Autumn Afternoon

In this episode, David Blakeslee, Trevor Berrett and Matt Gasteier provide a conclusion to their conversations about “Late Ozu”, carried over from the final three episodes of The Eclipse Viewer podcast. They’re also joined by Scott Nye.

About the film:

The last film by Yasujiro Ozu was also his final masterpiece, a gently heartbreaking story about a man’s dignifed resignation to life’s shifting currents and society’s modernization. Though the widower Shuhei (frequent Ozu leading man Chishu Ryu) has been living comfortably for years with his grown daughter, a series of events leads him to accept and encourage her marriage and departure from their home. As elegantly composed and achingly tender as any of the Japanese master’s films, An Autumn Afternoon is one of cinema’s fondest farewells.

Episode Links Criterion Ozu-San American Cinematheque (Scott) Cinema Gadfly (Arik) Criterion Reflections (David) A/V Club Film Comment
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Eclipse Viewer – Episode 60 – Late Ozu [Part 3]

http://criterioncast.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/60-Late-Ozu-Part-3.mp3

This podcast focuses on Criterion’s Eclipse Series of DVDs. Hosts David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett give an overview of each box and offer their perspectives on the unique treasures they find inside. In this final episode of a three-part series (and perhaps the podcast itself), David and Trevor are joined by Matt Gasteier to discuss two films (Late Autumn and The End of Summer) from Eclipse Series 3: Late Ozu.

About the films:

Master filmmaker Yasujiro Ozu directed fifty-three feature films over the course of his long career. Yet it was in the final decade of his life, his “old master” phase, that he entered his artistic prime. Centered more than ever on the modern sensibilities of the younger generation, these delicate family dramas are marked by an exquisite formal elegance and emotional sensitivity about birth and death, love and marriage, and
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Eclipse Viewer – Episode 59 – Late Ozu [Part 2]

http://criterioncast.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Eclipse-Viewer-Episode-59-Late-Ozu-Part-2.mp3

This podcast focuses on Criterion’s Eclipse Series of DVDs. Hosts David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett give an overview of each box and offer their perspectives on the unique treasures they find inside. In this second episode of a three-part series, David and Trevor are joined by Matt Gasteier to discuss the first three color films directed by Yasujiro Ozu: Equinox Flower, from Eclipse Series 3: Late Ozu, along with Good Morning and Floating Weeds. released as spine-numbered editions in the Criterion Collection.

About the films:

Master filmmaker Yasujiro Ozu directed fifty-three feature films over the course of his long career. Yet it was in the final decade of his life, his “old master” phase, that he entered his artistic prime. Centered more than ever on the modern sensibilities of the younger generation, these delicate family dramas are marked by an exquisite
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Eclipse Viewer – Episode 58 – Late Ozu [Part 1]

This podcast focuses on Criterion’s Eclipse Series of DVDs. Hosts David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett give an overview of each box and offer their perspectives on the unique treasures they find inside. In this first episode of a three-part series, David and Trevor are joined by Matthew Gasteier to discuss two films (Early Spring and Tokyo Twilight) from Eclipse Series 3: Late Ozu.

About the films:

Master filmmaker Yasujiro Ozu directed fifty-three feature films over the course of his long career. Yet it was in the final decade of his life, his “old master” phase, that he entered his artistic prime. Centered more than ever on the modern sensibilities of the younger generation, these delicate family dramas are marked by an exquisite formal elegance and emotional sensitivity about birth and death, love and marriage, and all the accompanying joys and loneliness. Along with such better-known films as Floating Weeds and An Autumn Afternoon,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Yasujirō Ozu’s 1929 Short Film ‘A Straightforward Boy’ Has Been Found

  • Indiewire
There’s been an epic find for serious film buffs this week. A nearly-finished 1929 film called “Tokkan Kozo,” or “A Straightforward Boy,” by the hugely-influential Japanese filmmaker Yasujirō Ozu has been uncovered. A representative of the Toy Film Museum in Kyoto and professor at the Osaka University of Arts, Yoneo Ota, announced the news at a September 6th conference.

Read More: 5 Essential Films By Yasujirō Ozu

“A Straightforward Boy” was gifted along with a collection of other films to the Toy Film Museum from the estate of a film fan. The found comedy is a shorter version of the 38 minute original movie, which remains lost, like many Japanese films shot before WWII. The museum is working to restore the film before it is screened later at the Kyoto International Film and Art Festival.

“A Straightforward Boy” depicts an abducted young boy who turns out too troublesome for his captor. The
See full article at Indiewire »

Cinema Gadfly – Episode 24 – The Happiness of the Katakuris

My guest for this month is Christa Mrgan, and she’s joined me to discuss the film she chose for me, the 2001 surreal horror-comedy film The Happiness of the Katakuris. You can follow the show on Twitter @cinemagadfly.

Show notes:

Takashi Miike has made an astonishing 90 films in his career, but none quite like this one Thematically it would be hard to have two films as different as this one and our last episode on Ozu’s An Autumn Afternoon Arcadia, California was home to at least one video store, in 2004 It really is quite hilarious that both An Autumn Afternoon and this were released by Shochiku, how the world changes Shochiku were, of course, also the sometime home to films by Nagisa Oshima, and Mikio Naruse As well as the phenomenally goofy films of their horror period, so brilliantly captures by Criterion in the When Horror Came to Shochiku
See full article at CriterionCast »

Cinema Gadfly – Episode 23 – An Autumn Afternoon

My guest for this month is Christa Mrgan, and she’s joined me to discuss the film I chose for her, the 1962 Japanese drama film An Autumn Afternoon. You can follow the show on Twitter @cinemagadfly.

Show notes:

This was the last film that Yasujirō Ozu made, after a career that started in the silent era His most famous is probably Tokyo Story, but he made 53 others, 19 of which are considered lost Christa’s husband is Neven Mrgan who was a guest on this podcast as well Chishū Ryū, who plays the lead here, was in 32 of Ozu’s 54 films Manga, J-pop, and Sushi are all examples of prominent cultural exports from Japan Toyko Story is based on Make Way For Tomorrow, a depression era film by Leo McCarey that touches on a lot of Ozu-type themes No one knows who wrote Caro mio ben, but it was probably Tommaso Giordani Before this podcast,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Episode 167: Criterion Collection Favorites of 2015

To celebrate the past year of Criterion Collection releases, Ryan is joined by David Blakeslee, Scott Nye, Aaron West, Arik Devens and Keith Enright to discuss their favorite releases of 2015.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSS or in iTunes

Corrections: In the episode, I should have had Aaron go before Arik, since I said I was going alphabetically.

Episode Links & Notes Favorite Covers Arik Odd Man Out by Eric Skillman Aaron Hiroshima mon amour by Sarah Habibi David Moonrise Kingdom by Michael Gaskell Keith Day for Night by Roman Muradov Process post Ryan The Black Stallion by Nicolas Delort Scott Blind Chance by Gérard Dubois Favorite Supplement Arik 65 Revisited Aaron Un tournage a la campagne David Interview with Gregor Dorfmeister, author of The Bridge Keith Reflections on … My Beautiful LaundretteColin MacCabe and Stephen Frears Ryan Restoring the Apu Trilogy by kogonada Scott Interview with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne on Two Days,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Criterion Collection: An Autumn Afternoon | Blu-Ray Review

The Criterion Collection refurbishes its previous release of Yasujiro Ozu’s 1962 swan song, An Autumn Afternoon for a new digital restoration Blu-ray transfer. The auteur, often described as the ‘most Japanese’ of directors, is a prominent cinematic figure (which explains his heavy presence in Criterion’s vault), ranking alongside the likes of Akira Kurosawa and Kenji Mizoguchi. Yet Ozu was a much more subtle, even methodical filmmaker in comparison, reveling in the depiction of everyday life acted out amongst traditional (some would say banal) activities, meant to reflect the changing cultural landscapes that often place its inhabitants at uncomfortable odds.

An aging widower, Shuhei Hiroyama (Chishu Ryu) lives with daughter Michiko (Shima Iwashita) and a younger son. Michiko tends to her father and brother, and it seems a happy existence for all, but now at the age of twenty-four, outsiders are beginning to question why her father hasn’t arranged for her to be married.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

'Don't Look Now' as Criterion Takes 'A Day in the Country' One 'Autumn Afternoon' & more in February

Every month, the Criterion Collection selects a number of cinematically and culturally important films and makes an effort to preserve them with specialized DVD and Blu-ray releases. For February 2015, the Criterion Collection brings a new mix of classic films into the modern era with new restorations that mark the first time they've ever been available in high-definition (usually). In the mix we have Nicolas Roeg's Don't Look Now, Martin Rosen's animated adaptation of Richard Adams's Watership Down, Jean-Luc Godard's Every Man for Himself, Jean Renoir's A Day in the Country, Federico Fellini's Satyricon, and Yasujiro Ozu's An Autumn Afternoon.

For full details on all six releases, read on.

Read more...
See full article at JustPressPlay »

The Noteworthy: "Making Waves", Huppert & Cattrall Look Back, "Missing Reels"

  • MUBI
Above: a sultry new poster for Paul Thomas Anderson's Inherent Vice. Dumb and Dumber To has opened to unsurprisingly mixed reviews, but Farrelly brothers champion R. Emmet Sweeney makes a case for the long awaited sequel for Film Comment:

"Dumb and Dumber To is about a deep, abiding friendship that can survive any indignities. After Harry and Lloyd’s journey is over, they’ve tossed away fortunes and frittered away kidneys, but they need each other to survive. As each momentary acquaintance slinks, or runs, away, it’s up to Harry and Lloyd to forget and move on. Or as is the case for Lloyd, to think about ninjas and wake up licking the grill of a big rig. Either way they can’t live without each other. And though they could never admit it, or even form the words in their desiccated cortexes, what they have is something like love.
See full article at MUBI »

Fellini's 'Satyricon', Roeg's 'Don't Look Now', Ozu's 'Autumn' & More Come to Criterion in February 2015

If you're reading this you're likely a fan of the Criterion Collection, which also means as much as you may be interested to know what new titles are coming to the collection in February 2015, if you aren't yet aware, Barnes & Noble is currently having their 50% of Criterion sale right now, click here for more on that. However, if you're already hip to the sale, let's have a look at the new titles that were just announced. The month will begin on February 3 with a new film from Jean-Luc Godard, his 1980 feature Every Man for Himself starring Jacques Dutronc, Nathalie Baye and Isabelle Huppert. It's a film Godard refers to as a second debut and is described as an examination of sexual relationships, in which three protagonists interact in different combinations. The release includes a new high-definition digital restoration, a short video titled Le scenario created by Godard to secure financing for the film,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

An Autumn Afternoon review Ozu's exquisitely tender final film

Yasujiro Ozu's last film, now rereleased, is superbly composed family drama about a father and daughter both intent on sacrificing their own happiness for each other

Yasujiro Ozu's exquisitely tender and sad final movie, An Autumn Afternoon, from 1962 now rereleased is filmed in soft colour. The critic must hesitate before invoking the cliche "watercolour", although the final scenes are likely to be watched through a swimmy blur of tears. Ozu's great repertory player Chishu Ryu plays Shuhei, a gentle and reticent widower, who is effectively being looked after by his beautiful, unmarried daughter, Michiko (Shima Iwashita). Michiko's somewhat dopey younger brother also lives at home, expecting, like his dad, to be waited upon hand and foot, while an older brother has married and gone away. Shuhei goes to a school reunion with his office chums, where the appearance of an old teacher shocks him: this ageing schoolmaster has become a somewhat embarrassing drunk,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Movie Review – An Autumn Afternoon (1962)

An Autumn Afternoon (Japan: Sanma no aji), 1962.

Directed by Yasujiro Ozu.

Starring Chishu Ryu, Shima Iwashita, Keiji Sada and Mariko Okada.

Synopsis:

An aging widower arranges a marriage for his only daughter.

An Autumn Afternoon tells the story of Hirayama (Chishu Ryu), an older man, who has three children. His eldest son, Koichi, is married. His daughter Michiko and college-son Kazuo remain at home. He works within a factory and meets with his friends Kawai and Horie over sake. The three spend a night with a former teacher, referred to as ‘The Gourd’, who lives alone with his daughter. ‘The Gourd’, working in a noodle shop, has an older daughter who has dedicated her life to looking after her father, forsaking her chance to marry. Kawai tells Hirayama that this could be the future of his own daughter. This drives the story, as Hirayama has to release his daughter from the boundaries of home,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Film Review: 'An Autumn Afternoon'

  • CineVue
★★★★★Familial ties and their effect on our lives were always a chief concern of Japanese master Yasujirô Ozu, specialising as he did in shomin-geki: realist films about ordinary people. His final film, An Autumn Afternoon (1962), is a fittingly contemplation of the passage of time; the dangers of holding tightly to the past collide with the pain of letting it go. Starring Ozu's regular cypher, Chishû Ryû, this was one of only a handful of colour films made by the director and is now rereleased by the BFI from a new 2K restoration courtesy of Shochiku Studios and Tokyo's National Museum of Modern Art. Ryû plays the affable widower Shuhei Hirayama, whose advanced years haven't dimmed the twinkle in his eye.
See full article at CineVue »

Yasujiro Ozu: like Austen, he tells the same satisfying story again and again

While Godzilla is bound to be a box-office monster, this might be a good time to rediscover Japanese film's exact opposite a minimalist master

Godzilla will no doubt scoff the global box office this weekend, and the roaring and gnashing of teeth on screen will find its analogue in the chaos of online debate between irate 1954 Gojira purists and whichever aficionados of the 1998 Emmerich-Devlin remake dare to reveal themselves. I say we remove ourselves to a calm, quiet place and concentrate on another Japanese film-maker working in the days when Tokyo's skies teemed with the gargantuan bestiary that came in Godzilla's wake.

Yasujiro Ozu's last movie, An Autumn Afternoon (1962), is one of the most sublime swansongs in the history of cinema, and confirms my belief that the best way to approach Ozu is the same way the Japanese read poetry: start at the end and work backwards. That's because Ozu's
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

To Ozu on His 110th Birthday

Today marks not only the 110th anniversay of Japanese director Ozu Yasujirō's birthday, but also the 50th anniversary of his death. He was born on this day in 1903 and died exactly 60 years later in 1963. For a director whose work is very neatly put together and assembled that feels awfully appropriate. It also makes this a rather opportune moment to bring him up. I hadn't seen any of his works until a few months back, but I've now see Tokyo Story (1953), Equinox Flower (1958) and An Autumn Afternoon (1962), the final film he made. I loved Equinox, but it's Tokyo Story that rightly has the reputation as one of the greatest films ever made. Just last year it topped the director's poll in Sight & Sound's greatest movies poll and ranked third on the critics list. Impressive.

I look forward to investigating more of this master's work (I've thankfully got some time). He never
See full article at FilmExperience »

Tiff 2013 Cinematheque Programme brings together classics from Cronenberg to Resnais

Over the years, the Toronto International Film Festival’s Cinematheque programme has given film fans an opportunity to watch old classics from world cinema on the big screen one more time. The 2013 incarnation of the Tiff Cinematheque programme sees seven critical favourites from yesteryear brought to life on the big screen. The films are:

- An Autumn Afternoon, the 1962 Japanese film by Yasujiro Ozu

- Gun Crazy, the 1950 American film by Joseph H. Lewis

- Hiroshima Mon Amour, the 1959 French/Japanese film by Alain Resnais

- Le Joli Mai, the 1963 French film by Chris Marker and Pierre Lhomme

- Manila in the Claws of Light, the 1975 Filipino film by Lino Brocka

- Rome, Open City, the 1945 Italian film by Roberto Rossellini

- Shivers, the 1975 Canadian film by David Cronenberg

Details of the movies screening at the programme can be found here. The Toronto International Film Festival runs from September 5th to the 15th.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Tiff 2013. Lineup

  • MUBI
Alfonso Cuarón's Gravity, one of many Special Presentations at this year's Tiff.

The Toronto International Film Festival has begun to announce its lineup for its 2013 edition, beginning with Gala and Special Presentations. To browse the festival's programming on their web site, visit here.

Gala Presentations

American Dreams in China (Peter Chan, China)

The Art of the Steal (Jonothan Sobol, Canada)

August: Osage County (John Wells, USA)

Cold Eyes (Cho Ui-seok & Kim Byung-seo, Korea)

The Fifth Estate (Bill Condon, USA)

The Grand Seduction (Don McKellar, Canada)

Kill Your Darlings (John Krokidas, USA)

Life of Crime (Daniel Schechter, USA)

The Love Punch (Joel Hopkins, France)

The Lunchbox (Ritesh Batra, India/France/Germany)

Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom (Justin Chadwick, South Africa)

Parkland (Peter Landesman, USA)

The Railway Man (Jonathan Teplitzky, Australia/UK)

The Right Kind of Wrong (Jeremiah Chechik, Canada)

Rush (Ron Howard, UK/Germany)

Shuddh Desi Romance (Maneesh Sharma, India
See full article at MUBI »
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