Summer and Smoke (1961) - News Poster

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Summer And Smoke (1961) Screening May 5th as Part of ‘Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis’

“The tables have turned, yes, the tables have turned with a vengeance! You’ve come around to my old way of thinking and I to yours like two people exchanging a call on each other at the same time, and each one finding the other one gone out, the door locked against him and no one to answer the bell!”

The 1961 classic Summer And Smoke, based on the Tennessee Williams play and starring Geraldine Page and Lawrence Harvey screens in a continuous loop Friday, May 5 in the Public Media Commons in Grand Center in St. Louis as part of this year’s Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis. This is a free screening (actually, continuous loop of screenings). Geraldine Page’s daughter and actress, Angelica Page, will be in town for the festival and part of a dramatic reading of ‘ensemble 2.0’ , a play based on Francesca Williams’s collection of family letters.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Actress Anne Jackson, Widow of Eli Wallach, Dies at 90

Actress Anne Jackson, Widow of Eli Wallach, Dies at 90
Anne Jackson, who collaborated extensively with husband Eli Wallach, together comprising one of the best-known acting couples of the American theater, died Tuesday at her home in Manhattan. She was 90.

As a couple, Jackson and Wallach (together above) came close to the level of celebrity of Lunt and Fontanne or, later, Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy. For five decades beginning in the early 1950s and ending in 2000, when they starred Off Broadway in Anne Meara’s comedy “Down the Garden Paths,” they energized theater audiences with a wide range of synergistic emotions, from loving to combative.

While Wallach had his own big-screen career (he died on June 24, 2014, at age 98) that included “Baby Doll” and “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly,” Jackson had a stage carer that was impressive all on its own. She was critically hailed for her range of chracterizations in David V. Robison’s “Promenade, All!” (1972) and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Actress Anne Jackson, Widow of Eli Wallach, Dies at 90

Actress Anne Jackson, Widow of Eli Wallach, Dies at 90
Anne Jackson, who collaborated extensively with husband Eli Wallach, together comprising one of the best-known acting couples of the American theater, died Tuesday at her home in Manhattan. She was 90.

As a couple, Jackson and Wallach (together above) came close to the level of celebrity of Lunt and Fontanne or, later, Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy. For five decades beginning in the early 1950s and ending in 2000, when they starred Off Broadway in Anne Meara’s comedy “Down the Garden Paths,” they energized theater audiences with a wide range of synergistic emotions, from loving to combative.

While Wallach had his own big-screen career (he died on June 24, 2014, at age 98) that included “Baby Doll” and “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly,” Jackson had a stage carer that was impressive all on its own. She was critically hailed for her range of chracterizations in David V. Robison’s “Promenade, All!” (1972) and
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Margaret ‘Maggie’ Blye, ‘Italian Job’ Actress, Dies at 73

  • The Wrap
Margaret ‘Maggie’ Blye, ‘Italian Job’ Actress, Dies at 73
Actress Margaret “Maggie” Blye, whose credits included the 1969 film “The Italian Job,” “Walking Tall” and “Little Darlings,” died on March 24, a spokesperson for Blye said. She was 73. According to the spokesperson, Blye died peacefully in her West Hollywood home following a two-year battle with cancer, with her brother and sister at her side. Born in Houston, Blye attended the University of Texas before transferring to UCLA in her senior year. Spotted by an agent, her first role was as Dusty in the Oscar-nominated film “Summer and Smoke,” which starred Laurence Harvey and Geraldine Page. Also Read: Patty Duke, Oscar-...
See full article at The Wrap »

Actress Margaret Blye, Star of the Original ‘The Italian Job,’ Dies at 73

Actress Margaret Blye, Star of the Original ‘The Italian Job,’ Dies at 73
Actress Margaret “Maggie” Blye, who starred in the original “The Italian Job,” died on March 24 in West Hollywood, Calif., after a two-year battle with cancer. She was 73.

Blye starred in many films and worked with some of the best in Hollywood: the Oscar-nominated film “Summer and Smoke,” starring Laurence Harvey and Geraldine Page, in which she played Dusty; “Hombre” with Paul Newman, Diane Cilento, Barbara Rush, and Richard Boone; “Hard Times” with Charles Bronson and James Coburn; “Waterhole #3” with Carroll O’Connor and James Coburn; “Diamonds for Breakfast” with Marcello Mastroianni; and “Ash Wednesday,” in which she portrayed Kate Sawyer, the daughter of Elizabeth Taylor’s Barbara Sawyer.

In 1969 Maggie starred as Lorna with Michael Caine and Noel Coward in the original version of “The Italian Job.” Subsequent film credits included “The Sporting Club”; “The Final Chapter: Walking Tall”; “Little Darlings,” with Tatum O’Neal and Kristy McNichol; “The Entity
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Actress Margaret Blye, Star of the Original ‘The Italian Job,’ Dies at 73

Actress Margaret Blye, Star of the Original ‘The Italian Job,’ Dies at 73
Actress Margaret “Maggie” Blye, who starred in the original “The Italian Job,” died on March 24 in West Hollywood, Calif., after a two-year battle with cancer. She was 73.

Blye starred in many films and worked with some of the best in Hollywood: the Oscar-nominated film “Summer and Smoke,” starring Laurence Harvey and Geraldine Page, in which she played Dusty; “Hombre” with Paul Newman, Diane Cilento, Barbara Rush, and Richard Boone; “Hard Times” with Charles Bronson and James Coburn; “Waterhole #3” with Carroll O’Connor and James Coburn; “Diamonds for Breakfast” with Marcello Mastroianni; and “Ash Wednesday,” in which she portrayed Kate Sawyer, the daughter of Elizabeth Taylor’s Barbara Sawyer.

In 1969 Maggie starred as Lorna with Michael Caine and Noel Coward in the original version of “The Italian Job.” Subsequent film credits included “The Sporting Club”; “The Final Chapter: Walking Tall”; “Little Darlings,” with Tatum O’Neal and Kristy McNichol; “The Entity
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Can you pass HitFix's hard-harder-hardest Oscar Quiz?

  • Hitfix
Can you pass HitFix's hard-harder-hardest Oscar Quiz?
Last year HitFix threw down a 21-question quiz for Oscar fanatics, and this year we're at it again. Join us for an ultimate Oscar test featuring three tiers of difficulty: hard, harder, and hardest. Get out a notepad! The answers are on the next page. (Please note that the term "actor" can mean a man or a woman, and that any listed year refers to the time of the movie's release, not the year of the ceremony.) Hard 1. What's the highest-grossing of this year's eight Best Picture nominees? 2. Jennifer Jason Leigh just received her first Oscar nomination for Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight. Only two performances in Quentin Tarantino's filmography have earned Academy Awards. Who performed those roles? 3. Which of this year's Best Picture nominees stars a character named Joy? 4. Who's the only person in history to win both an acting Oscar and a songwriting Oscar? 5. Name one
See full article at Hitfix »

19 years ago today: Superman got hitched

  • Hitfix
19 years ago today: Superman got hitched
Today, Clark Kent and Lois Lane are celebrating their 19th wedding anniversary. It was on October 6, 1996 that Dean Cain’s Clark and Teri Hatcher’s Lois got married in an episode of “Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman.” Three days later, DC Comics released “Superman: The Wedding Album” (an issue with a cover date of December 1996). It was the first time Lois and Clark got married in the comics for realsies. Only took them 58 years. Previous weddings had ended with “it was all a dream” or the like. Here’s the TV wedding moment that aired 19 years ago. Savor that ’90s cheese. Other notable October 6 happenings in pop culture history: • 1847: “Jane Eyre” was published, at the time bearing the pseudonym Currer Bell. • 1927: The first feature-length film with synchronized dialogue, “The Jazz Singer” held its premiere in New York City, scheduled to coincide with Yom Kippur, the Jewish
See full article at Hitfix »

Art Directors Guild Taps Trio for Hall of Fame

Production designers John Gabriel Beckman, Charles Lisanby and Walter H. Tyler .have been selected as inductees into the Art Directors Guild Hall of Fame.

The induction will take place at the Guild.’s 19th Annual Excellence in Production Design Awards ceremony at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Jan. 31.

Beckman received his first screen credit as an art director for Charlie Chaplin.’s 1947 black comedy “Monsieur Verdoux” and his designs were used in “Casablanca,” 1927’s “Lost Horizon” and “Les Miserables.” Some of his murals were created for the Grauman.’s Chinese and Egyptian theatres.

Beckman worked on “Gypsy,” “Home Before Dark” and “Calamity Jane” and TV series “Designing Women,” “Nero Wolfe,” “Tabitha” and “The Partridge Family.”

Lisanby is a three-time Emmy winner and is the only art director in the Television Academy.’s Hall of Fame. He pioneered the use of neon lighting for shows and the use of lighted steps
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Art Directors Guild Taps Trio for Hall of Fame

Production designers John Gabriel Beckman, Charles Lisanby and Walter H. Tyler .have been selected as inductees into the Art Directors Guild Hall of Fame.

The induction will take place at the Guild.’s 19th Annual Excellence in Production Design Awards ceremony at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Jan. 31.

Beckman received his first screen credit as an art director for Charlie Chaplin.’s 1947 black comedy “Monsieur Verdoux” and his designs were used in “Casablanca,” 1927’s “Lost Horizon” and “Les Miserables.” Some of his murals were created for the Grauman.’s Chinese and Egyptian theatres.

Beckman worked on “Gypsy,” “Home Before Dark” and “Calamity Jane” and TV series “Designing Women,” “Nero Wolfe,” “Tabitha” and “The Partridge Family.”

Lisanby is a three-time Emmy winner and is the only art director in the Television Academy.’s Hall of Fame. He pioneered the use of neon lighting for shows and the use of lighted steps
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Arlene McQuade, Actress on ‘The Goldbergs,’ Dies at 77

Arlene McQuade, Actress on ‘The Goldbergs,’ Dies at 77
Arlene “Fuzzy” McQuade, who played Gertrude Berg’s daughter, Rosalie, throughout the seven-year run of the hit 1950s series “The Goldbergs” and had a role in the Orson Welles film “Touch of Evil,” died on April 21 in Santa Fe, N.M. She was 77 and had long struggled with Parkinson’s Disease.

Born in New York City, McQuade worked in radio, early television and on Broadway as a young girl, including a critically acclaimed performance in Tennessee Williams’ “Summer and Smoke” that drew the attention of CBS executives, who signed her to a leading role in their new television series “The Goldbergs,” about a Jewish immigrant family. (Arlene is pictured above standing next to the seated Gertrude Berg, who played her mother on the show and penned most of the episodes.)

McQuade was a member of the New York Actors Studio for five years. In 1957, she traveled to California under contract
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Noteworthy: Kanye's Canyons, Corman's Criterions, Karloff's Guacamole

  • MUBI
News.

Every cinephile's favourite producer/distributor is at it again: Harvey Weinstein plans to axe 20 minutes from Bong Joon-Ho's Snowpiercer. Critic and programmer Tony Rayns had this to say:

"The Weinstein Company people have told Bong that their aim is to make sure the film 'will be understood by audiences in Iowa ... and Oklahoma.' Effectively, the notorious Hollywood executive believes the American mid-west is too stupid for Snowpiercer, a movie which essentially chronicles the journey of a few people at the back of a train who stage a revolt and proceed, in a straight line, towards the front. Leaving aside the issue of what Weinstein thinks of its audience, it seems to say the least anomalous that the rest of the English-speaking world has to be dragged down to the presumed level of American mid-west hicks."

According to the "acting" page on Vincent Gallo's website, it appears the
See full article at MUBI »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: The Magic Christian

  • Disc Dish
Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: May 28, 2013

Price: DVD $24.95, Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Olive Films

Raquel Welch helps Ringo Starr find the magic in The Magic Christian.

Directed by Joseph McGrath, the 1969 cult comedy film The Magic Christian starring Peter Sellers (The Pink Panther) and Ringo Starr comes from the pen of the brilliant Terry Southern (Dr. Strangelove, Barbarella), based on his 1959 comic novel of the same name.

In the movie, Sir Guy Grand (Sellers), the richest man in the world, whimsically adopts a young homeless man (Starr) who he happens to meet by chance during a stroll in the park. Together they set off on a series of inspired escapades that comically attack the snobbery and hypocrisy of modern society. Moving from one misadventure to another, they have encounters with characters portrayed by such noteworthy performers as Richard Attenborough (The Great Escape), Laurence Harvey (Summer and Smoke), Raquel Welch (Hannie Caulder), Christopher Lee
See full article at Disc Dish »

The 5 Most Ridiculous Best Actress Wins

  • The Backlot
I had a ball with a 10 Greatest Best Actress Victories list, and now it's time to reveal my dark side: Here are my five least favorite wins for Best Actress, and you'll notice they're all pretty fabulous actresses doing subpar work in subpar fare. Maybe I'm just mad at them for getting rewarded for the wrong work. Maybe I'm contrarian. T'any rate, here are the five offenders:

5. Jodie Foster, The Accused

This is not my way of damning Jodie for that cryptic, near-Dada speech she gave at the Golden Globes. This is my way of acknowledging that The Accused is unimportant Oscar bait full of teary monologues that just don't work. Jodie Foster is a commanding actress, and I consider her work in The Silence of the Lambs one of the most justified wins of the '90s. (Love the '91 Oscars so, so much. Thelma, Louise, Rambling Rose, Mercedes Ruehl,
See full article at The Backlot »

Mexican Star Martinez Dies

  • WENN
Mexican Star Martinez Dies
Mexican star Joaquin Martinez has lost his battle with pancreatic cancer at the age of 81.

The actor passed away at his home in Everdingen in the Netherlands on 3 January. Details of his death have only just emerged.

Martinez left Mexico for Los Angeles after making his breakthrough in the 1967 movie Pedro Paramo, and went on to work in film, TV and onstage for more than 30 years.

He starred in a number of Western TV shows, including Gunsmoke and Bonanza, and also appeared on Dynasty, L.A. Law and Ironside.

Martinez also appeared onstage with Christopher Reeve in Tennessee Williams' Summer and Smoke in 1988, as well as in the James Bond thriller Die Another Day in 2002.

The star is best remembered for his part in Sydney Pollack's Jeremiah Johnson and for playing the title role in Ulzana's Raid.

DGA Awards vs. Academy Awards: Odd Men Out Jules Dassin, Federico Fellini, Arthur Penn

Eiji Okada, Emmanuelle Riva in DGA (but not Oscar) nominee Alain Resnais' Hiroshima, mon amour (top); Melina Mercouri, Jules Dassin in Dassin's Oscar- (but not DGA-) nominated Never on Sunday (bottom) DGA Awards vs. Academy Awards 1953-1959: Odd Men Out Jack Clayton, David Lean, Stanley Donen 1960 DGA (14)Vincente Minnelli, Bells Are RingingWalter Lang, Can-CanDelbert Mann, The Dark at the Top of the StairsRichard Brooks, Elmer GantryAlain Resnais, Hiroshima, mon amourVincente Minnelli, Home from the HillCarol Reed, Our Man in HavanaCharles Walters, Please Don't Eat the DaisiesLewis Gilbert, Sink the Bismarck!Vincent J. Donehue, Sunrise at Campobello AMPASJules Dassin, Never on Sunday DGA/AMPASBilly Wilder, The ApartmentJack Cardiff, Sons and LoversAlfred Hitchcock, PsychoFred Zinnemann, The Sundowners   1961 DGA (21)Robert Stevenson, The Absent Minded ProfessorBlake Edwards, Breakfast at Tiffany'sWilliam Wyler, The Children's HourAnthony Mann, El CidJoshua Logan, FannyHenry Koster, Flower Drum SongRobert Mulligan, The Great ImpostorPhilip Leacock, Hand in HandJack Clayton,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Rosamund Pike: 'I was amazed that Rowan Atkinson even knew who I was'

Rosamund Pike surprised everyone when she was cast as a Bond Girl 10 years ago. And now she is spoofing that role in Johnny English Reborn

It feels strange to say that Johnny English Reborn is something of a revelation. It isn't the film itself – a tepid spy spoof sequel starring Rowan Atkinson and Dominic West, with the occasional blast of amusement and much slapstick. The unexpected element here comes in the form of Rosamund Pike, playing a top MI7 psychologist named Kate Sumner.

Pike provides both comic foil and love interest for Atkinson – all wide eyes, earnest expressions and fitted shift dresses. But her presence is never less than amusing; it's there in the tilt of her neck, the set of her shoulders, and, more than anywhere, in her face – the faint creases around the eyes and the corner of the mouth breathe humour into that famously crisp beauty. The
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Your Fav' Sixties & Seventies Ladies

During Summer 2011  -- winding down at last! -- we've been asking Tfe readers to choose the most memorable Best Actress nominated film characters. Which film characters have you taken into your hearts and headspace most fully? Who is always popping into mind unbidden? Below are the latest voting results for August's polls covering the 1960s & 1970s (previous results: 1980s and 1991-2010). We used five year intervals for voting and asked readers to choose the 5 most memorable characters from each group of 25 Oscar nominees.

If you're looking for these polls to provide a "face" of an era it looks like Julie Andrews wins the early 60s -- she was thoroughly modern back then! -- and Faye Dunaway takes over from there for a long run at the top (1966-1980) [* indicates that it was an Oscar winning role.]

1961-1965

Holly Golightly (Audrey Hepburn) Breakfast at Tiffany's Mary Poppins* (Julie Andrews) Mary Poppins [tie] Maria Von Trapp (Julie Andrews) The Sound of Music
See full article at FilmExperience »

Interview: Robert Englund Goes Beyond Freddy Krueger

Chicago – Robert Englund will inevitably and forever be linked with his most famous character, Freddy Krueger of “A Nightmare on Elm Street” and its sequels and spin-offs. But he has had a rich journey to Freddy, and connects with him through a myriad of character actor experiences.

Englund started as a classical actor, with training through a program from the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts. When he got back to his native California, he won a role in the cult film “Buster and Billie.” Moving up the ladder from there, it was his part in the 1983 TV mini-series “V” that got him on the map. Freddy was a year later, and the rest is horror film history.

Robert Englund was appearing at Flashback Weekend, an annual horror convention in Chicago. He was there also promoting a local horror film that he participated in, “The Mole Man of Belmont Avenue.” HollywoodChicago.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Claybourne Elder Wows New York With Tennessee Tour de Force

  • The Backlot
In the New Group and Tectonic Theater Project’s Off-Broadway production of Tennessee Williams’ One Arm, Claybourne Elder plays Ollie, a chiseled and charming young Navy boxer, and he’s a total knockout in the role.

The 6-foot-1 out actor from Springville, Utah, pulls no punches in depicting how Ollie loses his right arm in an auto accident and then turns to a life of prostitution and prison. Based on Williams’ 1940s short story and 1967 unproduced screenplay, One Arm has been lovingly adapted into an 85-minute one-act and championed by another theatrical heavyweight: Moisés Kaufman.

Claybourne Elder (Photo credit: Andrew Parsons and Serge Nivelle)

Kaufman, the openly gay, Tony- and Emmy-nominated writer/director (33 Variations and The Laramie Project), says One Arm is “one of the frankest portrayals of the homosexual world that Tennessee lived in. And that made me want to do it. For the most part, gay characters in
See full article at The Backlot »
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