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Dashes, commas, and judgmental twitchers | Brief letters

Harry Dean Stanton | Boris Johnson | Dancing about architecture | Fatberg | Ornithology of meetings | Ambridge antidote

Your obituary for Harry Dean Stanton (18 September) mispunctuates the title of the TV series Have Gun – Will Travel by substituting a comma for the dash. This had a curious effect on the list of TV horse operas Stanton acted in: “Laramie, The Gun, Have Gun, Will Travel, Bonanza and Rawhide.” Even the Oxford comma, which coincidentally played a part in Sunday’s episode of Strike, can’t come to our rescue with that one, though it could have helped with Bonanza and Rawhide.

Hugh Darwen

Warwick

Boris Johnson must know that birds do not sing in the nest (Report, 20 September). It is a place of secrecy and security. It is the immature that call out, eager to be fed. This is especially true if an over-sized cuckoo is among them, ensuring that they are ejected and crash to the ground below.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film News: Character Actor Harry Dean Stanton Dies at 91

Los Angeles – He was often categorized as the ultimate male character actor, but Harry Dean Stanton stood out on his own, with a persona that added immediate recognition in any supporting performance, and was unforgettable when he stepped into a lead role. Stanton died on September 15, 2017, at age 91.

With his hang dog demeanor and distinctive voice, Stanton made his mark over a 60 year career, and appeared in character roles in notable films such as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967), “Kelly’s Heroes” (1970), “The Godfather Part II” (1974), “Escape From New York” (1981), “Pretty in Pink” (1986) and “Last Temptation of Christ” (1988). He had bigger and more up front roles in “Repo Man” (1984), “Paris, Texas” (1984), “Wild at Heart” (1990), “The Straight Story” (1999), “The Green Mile” (1999) and the upcoming “Lucky” (2017).

Harry Dean Stanton in a Recent Photo

Photo credit: File Photo

Harry Dean Stanton was born in Kentucky, and was a World War II veteran in the Navy,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Harry Dean Stanton Dead at 91

Harry Dean Stanton Dead at 91
Veteran actor Harry Dean Stanton, whose TV roles included HBO’s Big Love and Showtime’s Twin Peaks revival, has died at the age of 91.

Stanton passed away of natural causes in Los Angeles on Friday, according to our sister site Variety. A familiar face to movie fans, Stanton crafted a Hollywood career that spanned six decades with memorable roles in films like the Molly Ringwald teen drama Pretty in Pink (as Andie’s dad Jack), Repo Man, Cool Hand Luke, Escape From New York, Alien and The Godfather Part II. But he made his presence felt on the small screen as well.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Deathstroke Returns, Akira Kurosawa, Zatoichi, And The Man With No Name -- The Lrm Weekend

By David Kozlowski | 28 July 2017

Welcome to Issue #6 of The Lrm Weekend, a weekly column highlighting cool and unique videos about film, TV, comics, Star Wars, Marvel, DC, animation, and anime. We also want to hear from you, our awesome Lrm community! Share your favorite videos to: @LRM_Weekend and we'll post your Tweets below!

Previous Issues: 7.21.17 | 7.14.17 | 7.7.17 | 6.30.17 | 6.23.17

Hey Lrm Weekenders, we survived San Diego Comic-Con 2017 -- did you have a favorite moment? Thor: Ragnarok's latest trailer was a big hit at Lrm (Hulk speaks!). As July comes to a close, we're ramping up for the big movies and TV shows of the late summer through the holiday season.

This week our emphasis is on Akira Kurosawa, the legendary Japanese filmmaker who's works have inspired generations of directors, screenwriters, and actors. Kurosawa's films have been adpapted and remade dozens of times, and we hope that this week's column gives you
See full article at LRM Online »

‘Peter Gunn’ Star Lola Albright Dies at 92

‘Peter Gunn’ Star Lola Albright Dies at 92
Lola Albright, the glamorous blonde actress best known for starring on the television series “Peter Gunn,” died Thursday at her home in Los Angeles. She was 92.

A native of Akron, Ohio, news of her death was first reported by the Akron Beacon-Journal. “She went very peacefully,” her friend Eric Anderson told the newspaper. “She died at 7:20 a.m. of natural causes. We loved her so much.”

Albright was a receptionist at Wakr radio in Akron, then left to go to Cleveland’s Wtam, where she wed announcer Warren Dean — the first of three marriages.

Her first film appearance came in 1947 in “The Unfinished Dance,” starring Margaret O’Brien. She then starred with Judy Garland in “Easter Parade” in 1948. The next year she appeared opposite Kirk Douglas in 1949’s “Champion,” portraying a spurned lover. Douglas received an Oscar nomination for his work.

Related

Celebrities Who Died in 2017

In 1950, she acted
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tom Hanks Found Clint Eastwood ‘Intimidating as Hell’ and Says He ‘Treats His Actors Like Horses’

  • Indiewire
Tom Hanks Found Clint Eastwood ‘Intimidating as Hell’ and Says He ‘Treats His Actors Like Horses’
Tom Hanks has had a pretty busy year, starring in three different films, hosting “Saturday Night Live” and was a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Hanks received the most acclaim for his performance as Captain Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger in the Clint Eastwood film “Sully,” which garnered critical and commercial acclaim. Hanks recently appeared on The Graham Norton Show and discussed working with the veteran director and his intimidating style.

Read More: ‘Sully’ Review: Tom Hanks Is a Hero In Clint Eastwood’s Drama, But the Crash Is the Real Star of the Show

“He treats his actors like horses,” says Hanks, “because when he did the 60s series ‘Rawhide,’ the director would shout ‘Action!’ and all the horses bolted. So when he’s in charge, he says in a really quiet soft voice, ‘All right, go ahead,’ and instead of shouting ‘Cut!’ he says ‘That’s enough of that.
See full article at Indiewire »

Michael Gleason Dies; ‘Remington Steele’ Co-Creator Was 78

Michael Gleason, the co-creator of Remington Steele and producer of such popular series as Diagnosis Murder and Rich Man Poor Man Book 2, died Friday at the age of 78. His death was confirmed on his Facebook page; no cause was listed. Gleason, a novelist as well as veteran producer, started as a writer for such 1960s series as Rawhide, Laramie, My Favorite Martian, The Big Valley and Peyton Place, continuing through the ’70s with Marcus Welby, M.D., Cannon, McCloud and Ric…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Directors' Trademarks: Clint Eastwood

  • Cinelinx
Directors’ trademarks is a series of articles that examines the “signatures” that filmmakers leave behind in their work. This month, we’re examining the trademark style and calling signs of Clint Eastwood as director.

Clint Eastwood became an american film star in the 1960’s thanks to his acting performances in a number of western films. As he began to branch out with new roles in front of the camera, he sought out to have more creative input into the types of film projects that he would be involved in. One way he was able to accomplish this was by creating his own production company which eventually allowed him to work behind the camera as director. His first film as director was 1971’s Play Misty For Me, which was well received by critics and did well at the box office. HIs second film as director was High Plains Drifter (1973), in which he also starred.
See full article at Cinelinx »

The Best & The Rest: Ranking Every Clint Eastwood Directed Movie

There have been few careers in film history like Clint Eastwood‘s. Strike that: there have been no careers like Clint Eastwood’s. After breaking through in the Western TV series “Rawhide,” the actor stepped into movies with Sergio Leone’s spaghetti western “Dollars trilogy” (1964’s “A Fistful Of Dollars,” 1965’s “For A Few Dollars More” and 1966’s “The […]

The post The Best & The Rest: Ranking Every Clint Eastwood Directed Movie appeared first on The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Nyff Sets World Premiere of Ang Lee’s ‘Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk’

The already-incredible line-up for the 2016 New York Film Festival just got even more promising. Ang Lee‘s Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk will hold its world premiere at the festival on October 14th, the NY Times confirmed today. The adaptation of Ben Fountain‘s Iraq War novel, with a script by Simon Beaufoy (Slumdog Millionaire), follows a teenage soldier who survives a battle in Iraq and then is brought home for a victory lap before returning.

Lee has shot the film at 120 frames per second in 4K and native 3D, giving it unprecedented clarity for a feature film, which also means the screening will be held in a relatively small 300-seat theater at AMC Lincoln Square, one of the few with the technology to present it that way. While it’s expected that this Lincoln Square theater will play the film when it arrives in theaters, it may be
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai at8d

The new branded line Shout Selects chooses Buckaroo for special-special edition treatment, with a long making-of docu just like the ones from the heyday of DVD. And this oddest of oddball sci-fi pictures has a backstory worth documenting. The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension Blu-ray Shout Select 1984 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 102 min. / Street Date August 16, 2016 / 34.93 Starring: Peter Weller, John Lithgow, Ellen Barkin, Jeff Goldblum, Christopher Lloyd, Lewis Smith, Rosalind Cash, Robert Ito, Pepe Serna, Ronald Lacey, Matt Clark, Clancy Brown, Carl Lumbly, Vincent Schiavelli, Dan Hedaya, Bill Henderson, Damon Hines, Billy Vera Cinematography Fred J. Koenekamp Production Designer J. Michael Riva Art Direction Richard Carter, Stephen Dane Film Editor George Bowers, Richard Marks Original Music Michael Boddicker Written by Earl Mac Rauch Produced by Sidney Beckerman, Neil Canton, W.D. Richter Directed by W.D. Richter

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Not content with its already well appointed special Blu-ray editions,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly Screens at The St. Louis Public Library August 6th

“Every gun makes its own tune.”

The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly screens at The St. Louis Public Library Central Branch (1301 Olive Street St. Louis) Saturday, August 6th at 1pm. This is a Free event.

There’s a new film series in town! To celebrate the Summer Reading Program theme, “Worlds of Wonder,” Central Cinema at the St. Louis Library will be screening some of the most unique and fantastical films ever shown on the big screen. This weekend is Sergio Leone’s 1966 epic The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly.

In 1964, Clint Eastwood accepted the lead role in a Western being filmed in Spain titled “The Magnificent Stranger.” The part had been offered to many of Hollywood’s most rugged actors, including Henry Fonda, Charles Coburn, and Charles Bronson. Eastwood, on break from his TV series Rawhide and looking for a film project, immediately recognized the story as
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Happy 86th Birthday Clint Eastwood! Here Are His Ten Best Films

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Happy Birthday to one of We Are Movie Geeks favorite stars. Clint Eastwood was born on this day in 1930, making him 86 years old. The actor and two-time Oscar winning director hasn’t let his age slow him down a bit. Sully, his new movie as a director, opens in September.

We posted a list in 2011 of his ten best directorial efforts Here

Clint Eastwood has appeared in 68 films in his six (!) decades as an actor, and here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are his ten best:

Honorable Mention: Honkytonk Man

By the 1980s, Clint Eastwood was one of Hollywood’s most bankable stars. With his own production company, directorial skills, and economic clout, Eastwood was able to make smaller, more personal films. A perfect example is the underrated Honkytonk Man, which also happens to be one of Eastwood’s finest performances.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93

William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93
Former SAG president William Schallert, best known as TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show,” died Sunday in Pacific Palisades, Calif. He was 93. His son Edwin confirmed his death.

His most memorable role was as beloved TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show” (1963-66). The performance still resonates: TV Guide slotted him at No. 39 on its list of Greatest TV Dads of All Time in 2004.

Schallert would be familiar to many for his memorable appearance on the famous “The Trouble With Tribbles” episode of the original “Star Trek” series: He played Nilz Baris, the agriculture undersecretary who is outraged to discover that the furry, endlessly reproducing aliens have devoured all the grain.

Schallert served as SAG president from 1979-81 and oversaw a three-month strike in 1980 that centered around rates and residuals for pay TV, videocassettes and videodiscs and included a successful boycott of the year’s primetime Emmy Awards.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Howard Hughes Reviews "Cattle Drive", "Calamity Jane & Sam Bass" And "Black Horse Canyon" UK DVD Releases From Simply Media

  • CinemaRetro
Unbridled Passion by Howard Hughes

Following the release in March of ‘A Man Called Gannon’ (1968), Simply Media in the UK continue to release more Universal-International westerns, this time of 1940s and ‘50s vintage. The new releases, out on 18 April, are ‘Calamity Jane & Sam Bass’ (1949), ‘Cattle Drive’ (1951) and ‘Black Horse Canyon’ (1954). This trio of films are literally ‘Horse Operas’, with the accent on thoroughbred steeds and their importance and role in the working west. Be they cattle drovers, stock breeders or outlaws, where would any of them be without the horse? The answer, of course, is walking.

I’ll review the DVDs in the order I watched them. First up is ‘Cattle Drive’, a 1951 western directed by Kurt Neumann. Chester Graham Jnr (Dean Stockwell), the spoilt, arrogant son of railroad magnet Chester Graham Snr (Leon Ames), is accidentally left behind when the train he is travelling on makes a water stop.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Oscar Winner George Kennedy Dead At Age 91

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Oscar winning actor George Kennedy has died at age 91, five months after the passing of his wife Joan. Kennedy's popularity as a character actor led to eventual leading man roles in major films. Born in New York City, he experienced stage life early, working with his parents in Vaudeville. During WWII he served under General Patton and was decorated for bravery. He drifted into acting on television in the 1950s. With his imposing physical presence (he was 6'4"), Kennedy immediately found work, generally playing heavies who squared off against the series' heroes. Among the shows he guest-starred on were such hits as "Have Gun, Will Travel", "Rawhide", "Gunsmoke" and "The Untouchables". He crossed into feature films in the early 1960s and first made a splash in Stanley Donen's 1963 comedy thriller "Charade" in which he played a crook with a hook hand who attempts to kill Cary Grant in a rooftop fight.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

George Kennedy obituary

Actor known for his roles in Cool Hand Luke, the Naked Gun trilogy and Airport

George Kennedy, who has died aged 91, was known mainly for three movie roles, each of which represented a different aspect of his career: as heavy, hero and clown. They were the bullying convict Dragline in Cool Hand Luke (1967) – for which he won the Oscar for best supporting actor – aviation expert Joe Patroni in the Airport series of disaster movies from the 1970s, and Captain Ed Hocken, the none-too-bright sidekick of bumbling cop Frank Drebin (Leslie Nielsen) in the spoof Naked Gun trilogy (1988-94).

In the early to mid-60s, the tall, bulky Kennedy (he was 6ft 4in) appeared as bad guys in dozens of TV western series such as Rawhide, Gunsmoke and Bonanza. In films, he continued in the same vein, as the sadistic jailhouse guard who beats up Kirk Douglas in Lonely Are the Brave
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

George Kennedy obituary

Actor known for his roles in Cool Hand Luke, the Naked Gun trilogy and Airport

George Kennedy, who has died aged 91, was known mainly for three movie roles, each of which represented a different aspect of his career: as heavy, hero and clown. They were the bullying convict Dragline in Cool Hand Luke (1967) – for which he won the Oscar for best supporting actor – aviation expert Joe Patroni in the Airport series of disaster movies from the 1970s, and Captain Ed Hocken, the none-too-bright sidekick of bumbling cop Frank Drebin (Leslie Nielsen) in the spoof Naked Gun trilogy (1988-94).

In the early to mid-60s, the tall, bulky Kennedy (he was 6ft 4in) appeared as bad guys in dozens of TV western series such as Rawhide, Gunsmoke and Bonanza. In films, he continued in the same vein, as the sadistic jailhouse guard who beats up Kirk Douglas in Lonely Are the Brave
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Great Digital Film Festival: Clint Eastwood and the legacy of Dirty Harry

  • Cineplex
“Why do they call you ‘Dirty’ Harry?”

It’s a question that courses throughout the 1971 thriller that gave birth to the Clint Eastwood character of the same name. The answer is different every time: He hates minorities, he always gets stuck with the dirty jobs, he’s a part-time pervert, he’s always getting the [wrong] end of the stick… And so it goes.

Catch Dirty Harry along with another action classic, 1985’s Runaway Train, as they return to the big screen during Cineplex’s Great Digital Film Festival, which runs Feb. 5-11.

But what was it about Dirty Harry that endured to spawn four sequels and give Eastwood’s already-surprising career a big-time second act?

First there’s Eastwood himself. A bit-part actor through the ‘50s, Eastwood found his stride in westerns throughout the ‘60s, first with the TV series "Rawhide" and then the Sergio Leone Man with No Name films.
See full article at Cineplex »

Robbert Loggia has died at 85 by Jennie Kermode - 2015-12-05 11:23:45

Robert Loggia at play with Tom Hanks in Big

Robert Loggia has died at the age of 85 from complications of Alzheimer's disease. The Italian-American son of a shoemaker, he was famous for his tough guy performances in films like Scarface, Lost Highway and Prizzi's Honor, but was a versatile character actor who also appeared in a range of very different roles, including that of the avuncular toy company head honcho in Big, alongside Tom Hanks. He played Richard Gere's father in An Officer And A Gentlemen, and was a general charged with saving the world from the alien menace in Independence Day.

Alongside his film career, Loggia produced a great volume of television work, appearing in much-loved series like Gunsmoke!, Starsky And Hutch, Rawhide, Little House On The Prairie, Hawaii Five-0 and The Sopranos. He is one of few actors to have gone up against both Quincy Me and Columbo.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »
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