Laramie (1959) - News Poster

(1959–1963)

News

Dashes, commas, and judgmental twitchers | Brief letters

Harry Dean Stanton | Boris Johnson | Dancing about architecture | Fatberg | Ornithology of meetings | Ambridge antidote

Your obituary for Harry Dean Stanton (18 September) mispunctuates the title of the TV series Have Gun – Will Travel by substituting a comma for the dash. This had a curious effect on the list of TV horse operas Stanton acted in: “Laramie, The Gun, Have Gun, Will Travel, Bonanza and Rawhide.” Even the Oxford comma, which coincidentally played a part in Sunday’s episode of Strike, can’t come to our rescue with that one, though it could have helped with Bonanza and Rawhide.

Hugh Darwen

Warwick

Boris Johnson must know that birds do not sing in the nest (Report, 20 September). It is a place of secrecy and security. It is the immature that call out, eager to be fed. This is especially true if an over-sized cuckoo is among them, ensuring that they are ejected and crash to the ground below.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film News: Character Actor Harry Dean Stanton Dies at 91

Los Angeles – He was often categorized as the ultimate male character actor, but Harry Dean Stanton stood out on his own, with a persona that added immediate recognition in any supporting performance, and was unforgettable when he stepped into a lead role. Stanton died on September 15, 2017, at age 91.

With his hang dog demeanor and distinctive voice, Stanton made his mark over a 60 year career, and appeared in character roles in notable films such as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967), “Kelly’s Heroes” (1970), “The Godfather Part II” (1974), “Escape From New York” (1981), “Pretty in Pink” (1986) and “Last Temptation of Christ” (1988). He had bigger and more up front roles in “Repo Man” (1984), “Paris, Texas” (1984), “Wild at Heart” (1990), “The Straight Story” (1999), “The Green Mile” (1999) and the upcoming “Lucky” (2017).

Harry Dean Stanton in a Recent Photo

Photo credit: File Photo

Harry Dean Stanton was born in Kentucky, and was a World War II veteran in the Navy,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Harry Dean Stanton Dead at 91

Harry Dean Stanton Dead at 91
Veteran actor Harry Dean Stanton, whose TV roles included HBO’s Big Love and Showtime’s Twin Peaks revival, has died at the age of 91.

Stanton passed away of natural causes in Los Angeles on Friday, according to our sister site Variety. A familiar face to movie fans, Stanton crafted a Hollywood career that spanned six decades with memorable roles in films like the Molly Ringwald teen drama Pretty in Pink (as Andie’s dad Jack), Repo Man, Cool Hand Luke, Escape From New York, Alien and The Godfather Part II. But he made his presence felt on the small screen as well.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Michael Gleason Dies; ‘Remington Steele’ Co-Creator Was 78

Michael Gleason, the co-creator of Remington Steele and producer of such popular series as Diagnosis Murder and Rich Man Poor Man Book 2, died Friday at the age of 78. His death was confirmed on his Facebook page; no cause was listed. Gleason, a novelist as well as veteran producer, started as a writer for such 1960s series as Rawhide, Laramie, My Favorite Martian, The Big Valley and Peyton Place, continuing through the ’70s with Marcus Welby, M.D., Cannon, McCloud and Ric…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Robert Crawford Sr., Emmy-Nominated Film Editor and Father of Actors, Dies at 95

Robert Crawford Sr., a film editor on several TV series who received an Emmy nomination the same year his sons, Johnny Crawford of The Rifleman and Bobby Crawford of Laramie, also were honored, has died. He was 95. Crawford died July 28 from complications of pneumonia in Woodland Hills after a five-year stay at the Motion Picture & Television Fund retirement home, his daughter, Nance Crawford, told The Hollywood Reporter. Johnny Crawford, an original Mouseketeer, portrayed Chuck Connors' young son Mark McCain on The Rifleman, which aired on ABC from 1958-63. Bobby Crawford played the younger brother Andy

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Batgirl Craig Dead at 78: Also Known for 'Star Trek' Guest Role

Batgirl Yvonne Craig. Batgirl Yvonne Craig dead at 78: Also featured in 'Star Trek' episode, Elvis Presley movies Yvonne Craig, best known as Batgirl in the 1960s television series Batman, died of complications from breast cancer on Monday, Aug. 17, '15, at her home in Pacific Palisades, in the Los Angeles Westside. Craig (born May 16, 1937, in Taylorville, Illinois), who had been undergoing chemotherapy for two years, was 78. Beginning (and ending) in the final season of Batman (1967-1968), Yvonne Craig played both Commissioner Gordon's librarian daughter Barbara Gordon and her alter ego, the spunky Batgirl – armed with a laser-beaming electric make-up kit “which will destroy anything.” Unlike semi-villainess Catwoman (Julie Newmar), Batgirl was wholly on the side of Righteousness, infusing new blood into the series' increasingly anemic Dynamic Duo: Batman aka Bruce Wayne (Adam West) and Boy Wonder Robin aka Bruce Wayne's beloved pal Dick Grayson (Burt Ward). “They chose
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Wright and Goldwyn Have an Ugly Parting of the Ways; Brando (More or Less) Comes to the Rescue

Teresa Wright-Samuel Goldwyn association comes to a nasty end (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt': Alfred Hitchcock Heroine in His Favorite Film.") Whether or not because she was aware that Enchantment wasn't going to be the hit she needed – or perhaps some other disagreement with Samuel Goldwyn or personal issue with husband Niven BuschTeresa Wright, claiming illness, refused to go to New York City to promote the film. (Top image: Teresa Wright in a publicity shot for The Men.) Goldwyn had previously announced that Wright, whose contract still had another four and half years to run, was to star in a film version of J.D. Salinger's 1948 short story "Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut." Instead, he unceremoniously – and quite publicly – fired her.[1] The Goldwyn organization issued a statement, explaining that besides refusing the assignment to travel to New York to help generate pre-opening publicity for Enchantment,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Movie News: In Memoriam, An Appreciation of Richard Kiel

Los Angeles – He was 7 foot 2 inches tall, an imposing figure that made for one of the most memorable James Bond villains. Richard Kiel portrayed “Jaws” in two Bond films – “The Spy Who Loved Me” and “Moonraker” – and left an unforgettable mark as a character actor with a distinctive look and persona. Richard Kiel died at age 74 on September 10th, 2014.

Richard Kiel in 2010

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Richard Kiel was born in Detroit, Michigan, and made his first appearance in the TV show “Laramie” in 1960. Throughout the 1960s, he made appearances in low budget horror movies and television, most notably in a famous episode of “The Twilight Zone,” entitled “To Serve Man,” and in the TV series “The Wild, Wild West.” It was a western series in the 1970s, “The Barbary Coast,” that caught the attention of the Bond producers, and the villain Jaws was born.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Richard Kiel, Towering Villain from James Bond Films, Dies at 74

  • PEOPLE.com
Richard Kiel, Towering Villain from James Bond Films, Dies at 74
Richard Kiel, the 7'2" actor best known for portraying steel-toothed villain Jaws in a pair of James Bond films, has died. He was 74. A spokesperson at Saint Agnes Medical Center in Fresno, California, confirmed Wednesday that Kiel was a patient at the hospital and died. Kiel's agent, Steven Stevens, also confirmed his death. Both declined to provide further details. Kiel famously played the cable-chomping henchman who tussled with Roger Moore's Bond in 1977's The Spy Who Loved Me and 1979's Moonraker. Bond quipped of the silent baddie: "His name's Jaws. He kills people." Despite his appearance in several other films and TV shows,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Richard Kiel, Towering Villain from James Bond Films, Dies at 74

  • PEOPLE.com
Richard Kiel, Towering Villain from James Bond Films, Dies at 74
Richard Kiel, the 7'2" actor best known for portraying steel-toothed villain Jaws in a pair of James Bond films, has died. He was 74. A spokesperson at Saint Agnes Medical Center in Fresno, California, confirmed Wednesday that Kiel was a patient at the hospital and died. Kiel's agent, Steven Stevens, also confirmed his death. Both declined to provide further details. Kiel famously played the cable-chomping henchman who tussled with Roger Moore's Bond in 1977's The Spy Who Loved Me and 1979's Moonraker. Bond quipped of the silent baddie: "His name's Jaws. He kills people." Despite appearing in several other films and TV shows,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

R.I.P. Richard Kiel (1939 – 2014)

American actor Richard Kiel – best known for his role as the towering steel-toothed henchman Jaws in the James Bond movie series – has passed away yesterday, aged 74. No cause of death has been released.

Born in Detroit in 1939, Kiel began his career in 1960 with a role in an episode of Laramie, before breaking into films in the early 60s with big screen appearances in the likes of House of the Damned, The Nutty Professor, Lassie’s Great Adventure and The Longest Yard alongside TV shows such as The Twilight Zone, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Wild Wild West and Kolchak: The Night Stalker.

In 1977, Kiel made his first appearance as Jaws alongside Roger Moore in The Spy Who Loved Me, and became one of a handful of Bond villains to return for a subsequent movie, reprising the role for 1979’s Moonraker, as well as the 2004 video game James Bond 007: Everything or Nothing.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

R.I.P. Actor Richard Kiel — James Bond Villain & ‘Twilight Zone’ Kanamit

  • Deadline
R.I.P. Actor Richard Kiel — James Bond Villain & ‘Twilight Zone’ Kanamit
The towering actor who played the mercenary assassin Jaws in a pair of Roger Moore-era 007 movies and the enigmatic alien in one of the most famous episodes of The Twilight Zone died today. Richard Kiel would have turned 75 on Saturday. His agent of 35 years, Steven Stevens Sr, told Deadline that Kiel died this afternoon at St. Agnes Medical Center in Fresno, CA. The 7-foot-2 actor with the crooked smile got his start in early-1060s TV, appearing in such series as Laramie, Thriller and The Rifleman. He appeared in the 1962 sci-fi feature The Phantom Planet before landing the chilling Twilight Zone role. In “To Serve Man,” he played a representative of an advanced, giant alien race called the Kanamits, who alight on Earth amid what seems to be peace and good will. Kiel delivers a mysterious encrypted book to a meeting of the United Nations, and the episode soars from there.
See full article at Deadline »

Famed James Bond villain Richard Kiel dies at 74: Report

Famed James Bond villain Richard Kiel dies at 74: Report
Richard Kiel, whose towering height and distinctive baritone voice defined his nearly 50-year career in television and films, most notably as the steely toothed James Bond villain Jaws, died Wednesday afternoon in Fresno, Calif. at the age of 74, TMZ reports. The actor had been hospitalized after breaking his leg earlier in the week, but it is still unclear if that was related to his death.

Kiel’s rep did not immediately respond to EW’s request for comment.

The Detroit-born Kiel, who grew to be 7 feet 1.5 inches, worked various odd jobs, including cemetery plot salesman and nightclub bouncer, before making
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Richard Kiel, James Bond villain Jaws, dies aged 74

Richard Kiel, James Bond villain Jaws, dies aged 74
Actor Richard Kiel has died at the age of 74.

The 7ft 2in star, who played James Bond villain Jaws in 1977's The Spy Who Loved Me alongside Roger Moore and in 1979's Moonraker, passed away on Wednesday (September 10).

TMZ reports that he recently broke his leg and received treatment at a hospital in Fresno, California.

No cause of death has been reported at this stage.

Kiel also appeared alongside Adam Sandler in the 1996 comedy Happy Gilmore.

The actor was born in Detroit, Michigan and made his acting debut in the TV series Laramie.

Sir Roger Moore, who played James Bond opposite Kiel in The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker, said that he was "distraught" over his co-star's passing on social media.

I am totally distraught to learn of my dear friend Richard Kiel's passing. We were on a radio programme together just a week ago. Distraught

Sir Roger Moore
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Richard Kiel, James Bond villain Jaws, dies aged 74

Richard Kiel, James Bond villain Jaws, dies aged 74
Actor Richard Kiel has died at the age of 74.

The 7ft 2in star, who played James Bond villain Jaws in 1977's The Spy Who Loved Me alongside Roger Moore and in 1979's Moonraker, passed away on Wednesday (September 10).

TMZ reports that he recently broke his leg and received treatment at a hospital in Fresno, California.

No cause of death has been reported at this stage.

Kiel also appeared alongside Adam Sandler in the 1996 comedy Happy Gilmore.

The actor was born in Detroit, Michigan and made his acting debut in the TV series Laramie.

Before finding fame as a Bond villain, Kiel got his career breakthrough in The Wild, Wild West in 1965, starring as an assistant to supervilllain Miguelito Loveless.

Kiel also lent his voice to a Bond video game in 2003. His most recent role was voicing Vlad for the animated movie Tangled in 2010.

Watch Richard Kiel, among other Bond stars,
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

R.I.P. Richard Coogan, Early TV’s Original Captain Video

The first man to play Captain Video — the Guardian of the Safety of the World! — in the early days of television died today in Los Angeles. Richard Coogan was 99. He starred on the first two seasons of Captain Video And His Video Rangers, the popular low-budget space opera that premiered in 1949 on the DuMont Network. The future-set series aired for a half-hour Monday through Friday, also on Saturdays in 1950, with a reported prop budget of 25 bucks a week. The jut-jawed Coogan played a scientific genius who invented radical weapons and led a vast network of defenders of good. The program was a favorite of The Honeymooners‘ Ralph Cramden and Ed Norton, who were card-carrying members of the Captain Video Space Rangers fan club. After leaving Captain Video, the New Jersey native starred on the CBS soap Love Of Life and toplined late-’50s Gold Rush drama The Californians. He also
See full article at Deadline TV »

Harry Carey Jr obituary

American character actor who appeared in seven westerns directed by John Ford, including The Searchers and She Wore a Yellow Ribbon

The actor Harry Carey Jr, who has died aged 91, was the last surviving member of the director John Ford's stock company, which included John Wayne, Victor McLaglen, Ben Johnson, Anna Lee, Ward Bond, Andy Devine and Harry's own parents, Olive and Harry Carey Sr. They formed a cohesive group and contributed to the distinctive world of the Fordian western.

Carey Jr, nicknamed "Dobe" by his father because his red hair was the same colour as the adobe bricks of his ranch house, made seven westerns with Ford, typically in the role of a greenhorn soldier. The most characteristic of these was Lieutenant Ross Pennell in She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949), the callow rival of John Agar for the hand of Joanne Dru. After she opts for the more handsome Agar,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Harry Carey Jr obituary

American character actor who appeared in seven westerns directed by John Ford, including The Searchers and She Wore a Yellow Ribbon

The actor Harry Carey Jr, who has died aged 91, was the last surviving member of the director John Ford's stock company, which included John Wayne, Victor McLaglen, Ben Johnson, Anna Lee, Ward Bond, Andy Devine and Harry's own parents, Olive and Harry Carey Sr. They formed a cohesive group and contributed to the distinctive world of the Fordian western.

Carey Jr, nicknamed "Dobe" by his father because his red hair was the same colour as the adobe bricks of his ranch house, made seven westerns with Ford, typically in the role of a greenhorn soldier. The most characteristic of these was Lieutenant Ross Pennell in She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949), the callow rival of John Agar for the hand of Joanne Dru. After she opts for the more handsome Agar,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Mary Murphy obituary

Hollywood actor who shot to fame as Marlon Brando's girlfriend in The Wild One

Co-starring with Marlon Brando in his prime is a bonus for any actor's filmography. The fame of Mary Murphy, who has died aged 80, was boosted considerably when she played his love interest in The Wild One (1953). Tame by today's standards, it was the film in which the brooding, rebellious, black-leather-clad Brando, as the leader of a motorcycle gang, emerged fully as a sex symbol.

The pretty, clean-cut Murphy, never considered a sex symbol herself, served as an excellent foil to Brando who, when asked what he is rebelling against, replies: "What've you got?" As the sheriff's daughter, she immediately attracts the attention of Brando when he comes in for a beer at the diner where she works. Gradually, the attraction becomes mutual as he rides his large, phallic motorcycle with her clutching his waist, her
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Boos! & Whoop-doos!: A Decade of Glossy Schlock!

The Drive-In? Whoop-doo!Boos! & Whoop-doos!: A Decade of Glossy Schlock! The Aughts ushered in a new era of glossy schlock that rose quietly from the ashes of the once burgeoning Drive-In scene. The Drive-In Theater has always stood as a temple for exploitive, low-grade cinema. But by 1999, even the most popular of these late night playgrounds had crumbled to dust. They rose to prominence in the late forties and early fifties, and then experienced a quaint resurgence in the late 70s and early 80s. By the time this decade kicked off to shouts of "Y2K", they had all been wiped clean off the face of the Cineplex landscape. But their aura and mystic still lingered around many a DVD shelf like a ploom of stink bomb smoke. If there's one lasting remnant the Drive-In era gave us, it's the Z-grade flick. The second run feature whose only purpose
See full article at MovieWeb »

See also

External Sites